Definitions

minnow

minnow

[min-oh]
minnow, common name for the Cyprinidae, a large family of freshwater fish which includes the carp (Cyprinus carpio), and of which there are some 300 American species. The European minnow is Phoxinus phoxinus. Minnows have soft-rayed fins and teeth in the throat only. Together with the closely allied sucker and catfish families they form the "hearing-aid" group of freshwater fishes, so-called for the complex set of bones extending from the airfloat to the inner ear, which gives them a superior sense of hearing and accounts for their characteristic wariness. The carp is generally considered the largest of the minnow family, although the squawfishes of the Columbia and Colorado rivers average 30 lb (13.5 kg) and the mahseer, a game fish of India, is also large. However, most minnows are small. They have great importance in the cycle of freshwater aquatic life, since they consume aquatic insects, larvae, and crustaceans and in turn serve as food for many larger fish. Most species are dully colored, though a few are brilliantly hued in greens, reds, and yellows. Various members of the family are called shiners, chubs, daces, roaches, breams, and bleaks. The Sacramento chub of California rivers, the creek chub, and the golden shiner, a greenish fish that turns golden during the breeding season, attain a length of 12 in. (2.5 cm). The red-sided and red-bellied daces are also named for the seasonal color changes in the male. The goldfish, genus Carassius, is also a member of the minnow family. Certain varieties of killifish of the family Cyprinodontidae are called topminnows and toothed minnows. The carnivorous mudminnows of the family Umbridae, found in the sluggish waters in the Great Lakes region and the Atlantic coastal lowlands, superficially resemble toothed minnows but are more closely related to the pike; they are also called dogfishes. Minnows are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Osteichthyes, order Cypriniformes, family Cyprinidae.

Small fishes, especially of the carp family (Cyprinidae), as well as some rockfish (family Umbridae) and killifishes (family Cyprinodontidae). The numerous species of North American cyprinid minnows are freshwater fishes, 2.4–12 in. (6–30 cm) long. Many are valuable as food for fishes, birds, and other animals and as live bait. The bluntnose (Pimephales notatus) and fathead (P. promelas) minnows, the common shiner, and the American roach are good bait species. The term also refers to the young of many large fish species. The minnow of Europe and northern Asia (Phoxinus phoxinus) is about 3 in. (7.5 cm) long and varies from golden to green.

Learn more about minnow with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Minnow may refer to the begining stage in a frogs life

  • the S.S. Minnow, the wrecked boat featured in the television series Gilligan's Island.
  • metaphorically, particularly in sports, an underdog, especially an extreme underdog.
  • in activities such as business, sports or politics, small or new players to contrast them with the established players. For example, countries like Bermuda and Scotland are referred to as "minnows" in the cricket World Cup (compare the term "small fry").

Fishes

"True" minnows in the subfamily Leuciscinae:

Other fishes called "minnows":

  • In parts of Britain, the sticklebacks
  • In Southeast Asia, the danionins
  • In the Southern Hemisphere, some members of the family Galaxiidae, in particular those of genus Galaxias
  • Generally any small freshwater fish, especially those used as bait by anglers. Most freshwater "minnows" are edible, while most saltwater minnows are not due to the salt content concentrated in their blood.

See also

Search another word or see minnowon Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;