Martineau

Martineau

[mahr-tn-oh]
Martineau, Harriet, 1802-76, English author. A journalist rather than a writer of literature, she was an enormously popular author. Her success is the more remarkable since she was deaf from childhood and the victim of various other illnesses throughout her life. The sister of the Unitarian minister James Martineau, she began her career writing articles on religious subjects. Her fame spread with Illustrations of Political Economy (9 vol., 1832-34) and Illustrations of Taxation (1834), two series of stories interpreting classical economics to the layman. After a visit to the United States in 1834, she became an advocate for the abolition of slavery and wrote several unflattering works on the American way of life, including Society in America (1837) and Retrospect of Western Travel (1838). Her later writings include Deerbrook (1839), a novel; The Playfellow (4 vol., 1841), tales for children; Letters on Mesmerism (1845); The Positive Philosophy of Auguste Comte (1853); and a very candid autobiography (1877), containing commentaries on the literary figures of her day.

See biography by V. Wheatley (1957); study by R. K. Webb (1960).

Martineau, James, 1805-1900, English philosopher and Unitarian clergyman; brother of Harriet Martineau. He strongly upheld the theist position against the negations of physical science. A renowned teacher and minister, he achieved international distinction in academic and religious circles. Besides numerous essays contributed to periodicals, he was the author of A Study of Spinoza (1882), Types of Ethical Theory (1885), and A Study of Religion (1888).

See study by H. Sidgwick (1902, repr. 1968).

(born June 12, 1802, Norwich, Norfolk, Eng.—died June 27, 1876, near Ambleside, Westmorland) English essayist, novelist, and economic and historical writer. She first gained a large reading public with a series popularizing classical economics, published in several collections (1832–34). Her chief historical work was The History of the Thirty Years' Peace, A.D. 1816–1846 (1849), a widely read popular treatment. Her most scholarly work is a condensed translation of The Positive Philosophy of Auguste Comte (1853). Her best-regarded novel is Deerbrook (1839).

Learn more about Martineau, Harriet with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born June 12, 1802, Norwich, Norfolk, Eng.—died June 27, 1876, near Ambleside, Westmorland) English essayist, novelist, and economic and historical writer. She first gained a large reading public with a series popularizing classical economics, published in several collections (1832–34). Her chief historical work was The History of the Thirty Years' Peace, A.D. 1816–1846 (1849), a widely read popular treatment. Her most scholarly work is a condensed translation of The Positive Philosophy of Auguste Comte (1853). Her best-regarded novel is Deerbrook (1839).

Learn more about Martineau, Harriet with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Martineau is a surname, it is of French origin and may refer to:

See also

  • R. v. Martineau (1990), leading Supreme Court of Canada case on the mens rea requirement for murder

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