Logical reasoning

Logical reasoning

In logic, three kinds of logical reasoning can be distinguished: deduction, induction and abduction. Given a precondition, a conclusion, and a rule that the precondition implies the conclusion, they can be explained in the following way:

*Deduction means determining the conclusion. It is using the rule and its precondition to make a conclusion. Example: "When it rains, the grass gets wet. It rains. Thus, the grass is wet." Mathematicians are commonly associated with this style of reasoning.

*Induction means determining the rule. It is learning the rule after numerous examples of the conclusion following the precondition. Example: "The grass has been wet every time it has rained. Thus, when it rains, the grass gets wet." Scientists are commonly associated with this style of reasoning.

*Abduction means determining the precondition. It is using the conclusion and the rule to support that the precondition could explain the conclusion. Example: "When it rains, the grass gets wet. The grass is wet, it must have rained." Diagnosticians and detectives are commonly associated with this style of reasoning.

See also

References

T. Menzies. Applications of Abduction: Knowledge-Level Modeling. November 1996.

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