Lester

Lester

[les-ter]
Horton, Lester, 1906-53, American modern dancer, choreographer, and teacher, b. Indianapolis. Moving to California in 1928, Horton formed his own company in Los Angeles and also performed in theater, films, and nightclubs. He became one of the country's most influential choreographers, incorporating such diverse elements as Native American dances and modern jazz into works of striking originality and drama. His influence is reflected in the work of his pupil Alvin Ailey. Other well-known dancers who worked in his company include Carmen deLavallade, Arthur Mitchell, and James Truitte. Horton's company continued to perform after his death until 1960.

Lester Young, circa 1955.

(born Aug. 27, 1909, Woodville, Miss., U.S.—died March 15, 1959, New York, N.Y.) U.S. tenor saxophonist. Young joined Count Basie's band in 1936 and was recognized as a major new stylist on the instrument. His small-group recordings from the late 1930s with Basie and vocalist Billie Holiday are classics. He was nicknamed Prez by Holiday (short for “President of the saxophone”). Young's subtle harmonies and unconventional rhythmic independence influenced both bebop and cool-jazz musicians; his gentle tone and ethereal lyricism inspired an entire school of jazz saxophone playing.

Learn more about Young, Lester (Willis) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born April 23, 1897, Toronto, Ont., Can.—died Dec. 27, 1972, Ottawa, Ont.) Prime minister of Canada (1963–68). He taught at the University of Toronto from 1924 until 1928, when he joined the Canadian foreign service. He was posted to Britain from 1935 to 1941 and to the U.S. from 1942 to 1945; he was ambassador to the U.S. from 1945 to 1946. He served in the Canadian House of Commons from 1948 to 1968 and as minister of external affairs from 1948 to 1956. During the latter period he also led the Canadian delegation to the UN; he was president of the UN General Assembly from 1952 to 1953. In 1957 he received the Nobel Prize for Peace for his role in resolving the Suez Crisis. He became head of the Liberal Party in 1958 and led it to victory in elections in 1963. His government introduced a national pension plan and a family assistance program, broadened old-age security benefits, and laid the groundwork for the National Free Medical Service. In 1967 he rebuked visiting French Pres. Charles de Gaulle for his support of separatism in Quebec. He retired in 1968.

Learn more about Pearson, Lester B(owles) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Lester Young, circa 1955.

(born Aug. 27, 1909, Woodville, Miss., U.S.—died March 15, 1959, New York, N.Y.) U.S. tenor saxophonist. Young joined Count Basie's band in 1936 and was recognized as a major new stylist on the instrument. His small-group recordings from the late 1930s with Basie and vocalist Billie Holiday are classics. He was nicknamed Prez by Holiday (short for “President of the saxophone”). Young's subtle harmonies and unconventional rhythmic independence influenced both bebop and cool-jazz musicians; his gentle tone and ethereal lyricism inspired an entire school of jazz saxophone playing.

Learn more about Young, Lester (Willis) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born April 23, 1897, Toronto, Ont., Can.—died Dec. 27, 1972, Ottawa, Ont.) Prime minister of Canada (1963–68). He taught at the University of Toronto from 1924 until 1928, when he joined the Canadian foreign service. He was posted to Britain from 1935 to 1941 and to the U.S. from 1942 to 1945; he was ambassador to the U.S. from 1945 to 1946. He served in the Canadian House of Commons from 1948 to 1968 and as minister of external affairs from 1948 to 1956. During the latter period he also led the Canadian delegation to the UN; he was president of the UN General Assembly from 1952 to 1953. In 1957 he received the Nobel Prize for Peace for his role in resolving the Suez Crisis. He became head of the Liberal Party in 1958 and led it to victory in elections in 1963. His government introduced a national pension plan and a family assistance program, broadened old-age security benefits, and laid the groundwork for the National Free Medical Service. In 1967 he rebuked visiting French Pres. Charles de Gaulle for his support of separatism in Quebec. He retired in 1968.

Learn more about Pearson, Lester B(owles) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Lester is a town in Limestone County, Alabama, United States, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. As of the 2000 census, the population of the town is 107.

Geography

Lester is located at (34.984304, -87.147909).

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.7 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 107 people, 42 households, and 33 families residing in the town. The population density was 58.4 people per square mile (22.6/km²). There were 46 housing units at an average density of 25.1/sq mi (9.7/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 100.00% White.

There were 42 households out of which 33.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.0% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.4% were non-families. 16.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 2.85.

In the town the population was spread out with 24.3% under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 31.8% from 25 to 44, 28.0% from 45 to 64, and 10.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 101.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $37,083, and the median income for a family was $44,688. Males had a median income of $31,250 versus $14,643 for females. The per capita income for the town was $16,073. There were no families and 7.0% of the population living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 22.2% of those over 64.

References

External links

Search another word or see lesteron Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature