Laodice

Laodice

[ley-od-uh-see]
In Greek mythology, the name Laodice referred to different people but most importantly the wife of Telephus and the Queen of Mysia.

Laodice

Myth

The Murder of Helicaon

  • Laodice was the fairest daughter of Priam of Troy and Hecuba, wife of Telephus, who was the son of Heracles. According to Apollodorus, after the destruction of Troy, she was "swallowed up by the earth," (Bibliotheca, 11.5.23); when Telephus came to fight the Greeks off and defend Troy. As they set foot on Asia Minor, Helicaon forced her to marry him and was going to drown their six year old son Eurypylus in Xanthos' Lake, but Telephus, king of Mysia, returned just in time. Telephus decapitated Helicaon and had the latter's face engraved in all Mysian shields- with the same expression of terror and fear in his eyes.

She abandons Helicaon for Telephus

Yet others say that that she had married Helicaon but when Telephus came she tricked him into believing that the cattle that was handed down to him by his father had been stolen and that she would exact his revenge if he would marry her. And so at night she stabbed him and married Telephus which explains why she was punished by being sucked up into a hell pit chasm in the earth.

Historical people named Laodice

In Hellenistic history, too, many women bear this name, almost all of them related:

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