Definitions

labour force

migrant labour

Semiskilled or unskilled workers who move from one region to another, offering their services on a temporary, usually seasonal, basis. In North America, migrant labour is generally employed in agriculture and moves seasonally from south to north following the harvest. In Europe and the Middle East, migrant labour usually involves urban rather than agricultural employment and calls for longer periods of residence. The migrant labour market is often disorganized and exploitative. Many workers are supervised by middlemen such as labour contractors and crew leaders, who recruit and transport them and dispense their pay. Labourers commonly endure long hours, low wages, poor working conditions, and substandard housing. In some countries, child labour is widespread among migrant labourers, and even in the U.S. those children who do not work often do not go to school, since schools are usually open only to local residents. Workers willing to accept employment on these terms are usually driven by even worse conditions in their home countries. Labour organizing is made difficult by mobility and by low rates of literacy and political participation, though some migrant labourers in the U.S. have been unionized. Seealso Cesar Chavez.

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Association of workers in a particular trade, industry, or plant, formed to obtain improvements in pay, benefits, and working conditions through collective action. The first fraternal and self-help associations of labourers appeared in Britain in the 18th century, and the era of modern labour unions began in Britain, Europe, and the U.S. in the 19th century. The movement met with hostility from employers and governments, and union organizers were regularly prosecuted. British unionism received its legal foundation in the Trade-Union Act of 1871. In the U.S. the same effect was achieved more slowly through a series of court decisions that whittled away at the use of injunctions and conspiracy laws against unions. The founding of the American Federation of Labor (AFL) in 1886 marked the beginning of a successful, large-scale labour movement in the U.S. The unions brought together in the AFL were craft unions, which represented workers skilled in a particular craft or trade. Only a few early labour organizers argued in favour of industrial unions, which would represent all workers, skilled or unskilled, in a single industry. The Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) was founded by unions expelled from the AFL for attempting to organize unskilled workers, and by 1941 it had assured the success of industrial unionism by organizing the steel and automotive industries (see AFL-CIO). The use of collective bargaining to settle wages, working conditions, and disputes is standard in all noncommunist industrial countries, though union organization varies from country to country. In Britain, labour unions displayed a strong inclination to political activity that culminated in the formation of the Labour Party in 1906. In France, too, the major unions became highly politicized; the Confédération Générale du Travail (formed in 1895) was allied with the Communist Party for many years, while the Confédération Française Démocratique du Travail is more moderate politically. Japan developed a form of union organization known as enterprise unionism, which represents workers in a single plant or multiplant enterprise rather than within a craft or industry.

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Body of law that applies to matters such as employment, wages, conditions of work, labour unions, and labour-management relations. Laws intended to protect workers, including children, from abusive employment practices were not enacted in significant numbers until the late 19th century in Europe and slightly later in the U.S. In Asia and Africa, labour legislation did not emerge until the 1940s and '50s. Employment laws cover matters such as hiring, training, advancement, and unemployment compensation. Wage laws cover the forms and methods of payment, pay rates, social security, pensions, and other matters. Legislation on working conditions regulates hours, rest periods, vacations, child labour, equality in the workplace, and health and safety. Laws on trade unions and labour-management relations address the status of unions, the rights and obligations of workers' and employers' organizations, collective bargaining agreements, and rules for settling strikes and other disputes. Seealso arbitration; mediation.

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Study of how workers are allocated among jobs, how their rates of pay are determined, and how their efficiency is affected by various factors. The labour force of a country includes all those who work for gain in any capacity as well as those who are unemployed but seeking work. Many factors influence how workers are utilized and how much they are paid, including qualities of the labour force itself (such as health, level of education, distribution of special training and skills, and degree of mobility), structural characteristics of the economy (e.g., proportions of heavy manufacturing, technology, and service industries), and institutional factors (including the extent and power of labour unions and employers' associations and the presence of minimum-wage laws). Miscellaneous factors such as custom and variations in the business cycle are also considered. Certain general trends are widely accepted by labour economists; for instance, wage levels tend to be higher in jobs that involve high risk, in industries that require higher levels of education or training, in economies that have high proportions of such industries, and in industries that are heavily unionized.

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In economics, the general body of wage earners. In classical economics, labour is one of the three factors of production, along with capital and land. Labour can also be used to describe work performed, including any valuable service rendered by a human agent in the production of wealth, other than accumulating and providing capital. Labour is performed for the sake of its product or, in modern economic life, for the sake of a share of the aggregate product of the community's industry. The price per unit of time, or wage rate, commanded by a particular kind of labour in the market depends on a number of variables, such as the technical efficiency of the worker, the demand for that person's particular skills, and the supply of similarly skilled workers. Other variables include training, experience, intelligence, social status, prospects for advancement, and relative difficulty of the work. All these factors make it impossible for economists to assign a standard value to labour. Instead, economists often quantify labour hours according to the quantity and value of the goods or services produced.

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Specialization in the production process. Complex jobs can usually be less expensively completed by a large number of people each performing a small number of specialized tasks than by one person attempting to complete the entire job. The idea that specialization reduces costs, and thereby the price the consumer pays, is embedded in the principle of comparative advantage. Division of labour is the basic principle underlying the assembly line in mass production systems. See Émile Durkheim.

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Employment of boys and girls in occupations deemed unfit for children. Such labour is strictly controlled in many countries as a result of the effective enforcement of laws passed in the 20th century (e.g., the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of the Child in 1959). In developing nations the use of child labour is still common. Restrictive legislation has proved ineffective in impoverished societies with few schools, although some improvements have resulted from global activism, such as boycotts of multinational firms alleged to be exploiting child labour abroad.

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This is a list of countries by size of the labour force mostly based on The World Factbook

Rank Country/Region Labor force Date of
Information
- 3,001,000,000 2007 est.
1 803,300,000 2007 est.

|-

2 516,400,000 2007 est.

|-

- 222,400,000 2006 est.

|-

3 153,100,000 2007 est.

|-

4 108,000,000 2007 est.

|-

5 99,470,000 2007 est.

|-

6 75,100,000 November 2007 est.

|-

7 69,400,000 2007 est.

|-

8 66,070,000 2007 est.

|-

9 50,130,000 2007 est.

|-

10 49,180,000 2007 est.

|-

11 45,730,000 2007 est.

|-

12 45,380,000 2007 est.

|-

13 43,630,000 2007 est.

|-

14 37,120,000 2007 est.

|-

15 36,220,000 2007 est.

|-

16 30,710,000 2007 est.

|-

17 29,260,000 2007 est.

|-

18 28,700,000 2006 est.

|-

19 27,760,000 2007 est.

|-

20 27,270,000 1999

|-

21 25,270,000 2007 est.

|-

22 24,860,000 2007 est.

|-

23 23,990,000 2007 est.

|-

24 22,490,000 2007 est.

|-

25 22,010,000 2007 est.

|-

26 21,630,000 2007 est.

|-

27 20,650,000 2007 est.

|-

28 20,490,000 2007 est.

|-

29 20,000,000 2004 est.

|-

30 19,690,000 2007 est.

|-

31 17,900,000 2007 est.

|-

32 17,010,000 2007 est.

|-

33 16,100,000 2007 est.

|-

34 15,000,000 2004 est.

|-

35 15,000,000 2006 est.

|-

36 14,600,000 2007 est.

|-

37 14,050,000 2007 est.

|-

38 12,500,000 2007 est.

|-

39 11,850,000 2005 est.

|-

40 11,350,000 2007 est.

|-

41 11,290,000 2007 est.

|-

42 11,110,000 2006 est.

|-

43 10,910,000 2007 est.

|-

44 10,900,000 2007 est.

|-

45 10,780,000 2007 est.

|-

46 9,600,000 2007 est.

|-

47 9,419,000 2007 est.

|-

48 9,380,000 2007 est.

|-

49 9,350,000 2007 est.

|-

50 8,156,000 2007 est.

|-

51 7,670,000 2007 est.

|-

52 7,500,000 2007 est.

|-

53 7,415,000 1996 est.

|-

54 7,400,000 2004 est.

|-

55 7,300,000 2000

|-

56 7,000,000 2003 est.

|-

57 6,970,000 2007 est.

|-

58 6,907,000 2007 est.

|-

59 6,680,000 2007 est.

|-

60 6,573,000 2007 est.

|-

61 6,488,000 2007 est.

|-

62 6,316,000 2007 est.

|-

63 5,500,000 2007 est.

|-

64 5,457,000 2007 est.

|-

65 5,400,000 2007 est.

|-

66 5,380,000 2007 est.

|-

67 5,350,000 2007 est.

|-

68 5,243,000 2007 est.

|-

69 5,030,000 2007 est.

|-

70 5,000,000 2003

|-

71 4,989,000 2007 est.

|-

72 4,940,000 2007 est.

|-

73 4,853,000 2007 est.

|-

74 4,850,000 2007 est.

|-

75 4,793,000 2006 est.

|-

76 4,660,000 2007 est.

|-

77 4,600,000 2000

|-

78 4,550,000 2007 est.

|-

79 4,500,000 2001 est.

|-

80 4,300,000 31 December 2005

|-

81 4,190,000 2007 est.

|-

82 3,998,000 2007 est.

|-

83 3,986,000 2007 est.

|-

84 3,958,000 2007 est.

|-

85 3,850,000 2007 est.

|-

86 3,747,000 2006

|-

87 3,700,000 2006 est.

|-

88 3,700,000 1975

|-

89 3,640,000 2007 est.

|-

90 3,600,000 1995

|-

91 3,591,000 2007 est.

|-

92 3,560,000 2007 est.

|-

93 3,557,000 2007 est.

|-

94 3,440,000 2007 est.

|-

95 3,119,000 2007 est.

|-

96 2,990,000 2002

|-

97 2,961,000 2002 est.

|-

98 2,900,000 2007 est.

|-

99 2,880,000 2007 est.

|-

100 2,870,000 2007 est.

|-

101 2,812,000 2007 est.

|-

102 2,735,000 2007

|-

103 2,700,000 2000

|-

104 {{flag align="right"| 2,680,000 2007 est.

|-

105 2,670,000 2007 est.

|-

106 2,661,000 2007 est.

|-

107 2,500,000 2007 est.

|-

108 2,262,000 2007 est.

|-

109 2,230,000 2007 est.

|-

110 2,210,000 2007 est.

|-

111 2,100,000 2006 est.

|-

112 2,100,000 2007 est.

|-

113 2,089,000 2004 est.

|-

114 2,020,000 2007 est.

|-

115 1,946,000 2007 est.

|-

116 1,857,000 2006

|-

117 1,820,000 2007 est.

|-

118 1,714,000 2007 est.

|-

119 1,587,000 2007 est.

|-

120 1,563,000 2007 est.

|-

121 1,500,000 2005 est.

|-

122 1,500,000 2007 est.

|-

123 1,471,000 2007 est.

|-

124 1,369,000 1981 est.

|-

125 1,333,000 2007 est.

|-

126 1,302,000 1998

|-

127 1,300,000 2000

|-

128 1,255,000 2007 est.

|-

129 1,200,000 2007 est.

|-

130 1,167,000 2007 est.

|-

131 1,136,000 2006 est.

|-

132 {{flag align="right"| 1,090,000 September 2006 est.

|-

133 1,042,000 2006

|-

134 1,026,000 2001

|-

135 920,000 2002 est.

|-

136 920,000 2007 est.

|-

137 906,900 2007 est.

|-

138 838,000 2000 est.

|-

139 832,000 June 2007 est.

|-

140 786,000 2001

|-

141 688,000 2007 est.

|-

142 660,000 2007 est.

|-

143 638,000 2007 est.

|-

144 615,400 2007 est.

|-

145 605,000 2006

|-

146 582,000 2007 est.

|-

147 552,700 2007 est.

|-

148 480,000 1999

|-

149 418,000 2001 est.

|-

150 400,000 1996

|-

151 377,400 2007 est.

|-

152 363,000 2007 est.

|-

153 300,000 2006

|-

154 288,400 2004

|-

155 282,000 2000

|-

156 275,000 2006

|-

157 267,000 2006

|-

158 259,100 2004

|-

159 249,200 1999

|-

160 205,000 2007 est.

|-

161 181,900 2006

|-

162 180,400 2006 est.

|-

163 180,000 2007 est.

|-

164 164,000 2006 est.

|-

165 156,700 2004

|-

166 144,500 1996 est.

|-

167 128,500 2001 est.

|-

168 120,600 1990

|-

169 117,500 2006 est.

|-

170 113,000 2006 est.

|-

171 101,300 2004

|-

172 90,000 2000 est.

|-

173 83,600 2005

|-

174 78,990 2004

|-

175 76,410 1999

|-

176 70,000 1995

|-

177 65,930 December 2005

|-

178 62,050 2002 est.

|-

179 53,560 June 2006

|-

180 44,560 2002

|-

181 44,470 2000

|-

182 44,000 2005 est.

|-

183 43,980 2004 est.

|-

184 43,800 2001 est.

|-

185 42,420 2005

|-

186 42,300 1996

|-

187 41,680 1991 est.

|-

188 41,500 2004 est.

|-

189 39,690 2001

|-

190 39,560 2006

|-

191 38,360 2004

|-

192 37,410 2000

|-

193 35,050 1991

|-

194 33,910 2003

|-

195 32,120 2004

|-

196 31,470 March 2006

|-

197 30,000 1991

|-

198 29,500 31 December 2001

|-

199 25,000 2000 est.

|-

200 24,250 October 2000

|-

201 23,450 2004

|-

202 20,470 2004

|-

203 18,170 June 1995

|-

204 17,630 2005

|-

205 14,680 2000

|-

206 12,770 2004

|-

207 12,690 2001

|-

208 12,000 2005 est.

|-

209 9,777 2005

|-

210 7,870 2001 est.

|-

211 6,820 2001

|-

212 6,049 2001

|-

213 4,848 1990 est.

|-

214 4,521 2000 est.

|-

215 3,615 2004 est.

|-

216 3,450 2005

|-

217 3,104 2003

|-

218 2,486 1998 est.

|-

219 1,724 1996

|-

220 663 2001

|-

221 440 2001

|-

222 15 2004

Notes

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