Definitions

Kohler

Kohler

[kœ-luhr]
Kohler, Kaufmann, 1843-1926, American rabbi, scholar, and leader in Reform Judaism, b. Bavaria. He emigrated to the United States in 1869 and served with congregations in Detroit and Chicago before becoming (1879) rabbi of Temple Beth-El in New York City. From 1903 to 1921 he was president of the Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati. He called the conference (1885) at which the Pittsburgh Platform of Reformed Judaism was adopted. One of the editors of The Jewish Encyclopedia, he also wrote Backwards or Forwards: Lectures on Reform Judaism (1885), Jewish Theology Systematically and Historically Considered (1918), Heaven and Hell in Comparative Religion (1923), and the Origins of the Synagogue and the Church (1929). His Studies, Addresses, and Personal Papers (1931) contains a short autobiography.

See R. J. Marx, Kaufmann Kohler as Reformer (1951).

Kohler, village (1990 pop. 1,817), Sheboygan co., E Wis., on the Sheboygan River; inc. 1912. The Kohler plumbing-fixtures plant there, which still produces its famous stainless-steel products, has been the scene of some of the longest and most bitter labor disputes in U.S. history. The last strike began in 1954 and ended in 1962.

(born May 10, 1843, Fürth, Bavaria—died Jan. 28, 1926, New York, N.Y., U.S.) German-born U.S. rabbi. He was brought up in Orthodox Judaism but soon came under the influence of Reform leader Abraham Geiger. His early writings approached biblical texts critically and led to his exclusion from the German rabbinate. He emigrated to the U.S. in 1869 and served Reform congregations in Detroit, Chicago, and New York City. In 1885 he was the driving force in formulating the Pittsburgh Platform. He served as president of Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati 1903–21. His chief work was Jewish Theology (1918).

Learn more about Kohler, Kaufmann with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born May 10, 1843, Fürth, Bavaria—died Jan. 28, 1926, New York, N.Y., U.S.) German-born U.S. rabbi. He was brought up in Orthodox Judaism but soon came under the influence of Reform leader Abraham Geiger. His early writings approached biblical texts critically and led to his exclusion from the German rabbinate. He emigrated to the U.S. in 1869 and served Reform congregations in Detroit, Chicago, and New York City. In 1885 he was the driving force in formulating the Pittsburgh Platform. He served as president of Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati 1903–21. His chief work was Jewish Theology (1918).

Learn more about Kohler, Kaufmann with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Kohler is a village in Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, along the Sheboygan River. The population was 1,926 at the 2000 census. It is included in the Sheboygan, Wisconsin Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography

Kohler is located at (43.738244, -87.781109).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 5.6 square miles (14.4 km²), of which, 5.4 square miles (14.1 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.3 km²) of it (1.98%) is water.

Demographics

Census 2000 data:

Population 1926 100.00%
White 1872 97.20%
Asian 37 1.92%
Hispanic or Latino 16 0.83%
• Two or more races 10 0.52%
African American 1 0.05%
Pacific Islander 1 0.05%
Other races 5 0.26%

The population density was 354.0 people per square mile (136.7/km²). There were 792 housing units at an average density of 145.6/sq mi (56.2/km²).

There were 568 families and 737 households out of which 38.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.4% were married couples living together, 3.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.9% were non-families. 21.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the village the population was spread out with 28.8% under the age of 18, 3.3% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 27.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.0 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $75,000, and the median income for a family was $86,123. Males had a median income of $53,839 versus $32,188 for females. The per capita income for the village was $39,355. About 2.6% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.4% of those under age 18 and 3.9% of those age 65 or over.

Business

The largest employer in Kohler is the Kohler Company, a worldwide leader in plumbing products; the village itself was created by the company as a planned community in 1912. Many people in Wisconsin refer to drinking fountains as "bubblers," because the first Kohler drinking fountain was known as "The Bubbler. In addition to the factory, the Kohler Company also owns The American Club golf resort, which includes the Blackwolf Run course complex in Kohler and the Whistling Straits complex in nearby Haven.

The Kohler Villageris a monthly community newspaper serving the Village of Kohler. The printed version is mailed free-of-charge to all Kohler households and businesses in the Village of Kohler.

References

External links

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