Jobs

Jobs

[job]
Jobs, Steven Paul, 1955-, American businessman, b. San Francisco. Working with Stephen Wozniak, Jobs helped launch the personal-computer revolution by introducing the first Apple computer in 1976. Jobs later successfully established Apple's line as a user-friendly, graphically oriented alternative to the IBM-Microsoft personal computer and an important factor in desktop publishing. He resigned in 1985 after losing a corporate power struggle. In 1985 he founded the NeXT Computer Company and in 1986 bought Pixar Animation Studios, a computer animation firm founded by George Lucas. When Pixar went public in 1995, Jobs became an overnight billionaire; in 2006 Pixar was purchased by the Walt Disney Company, making Jobs the largest shareholder in Disney. In 1997, Jobs returned to Apple as chief executive and since has helped revive the financially ailing company while reestablishing his own reputation as an industry visionary.

See L. Butcher, Accidental Millionaire (1988); J. Young, Steve Jobs (1988); A. Deutschman, The Second Coming of Steve Jobs (2000); D. A. Price, The Pixar Touch: The Making of a Company (2008).

(born Feb. 24, 1955, San Francisco, Cal., U.S.) U.S. businessman. Adopted in infancy, he grew up in Los Altos. He dropped out of Reed College and went to work for Atari Corp. designing video games. In 1976 he cofounded (with Stephen Wozniak) Apple Computer (incorporated in 1977; now Apple Inc.). The first Apple computer, created when Jobs was only 21, changed the public's idea of a computer from a huge machine for scientific use to a home appliance that could be used by anyone. Apple's Macintosh computer, which appeared in 1984, introduced a graphical user interface and mouse technology that became the standard for all applications interfaces. In 1980 Apple became a public corporation, and Jobs became the company's chairman. Management conflicts led him to leave Apple in 1985 to form NeXT Computer Inc., but he returned to Apple in 1996 and became CEO in 1997. The striking new iMac computer (1998) revived the company's flagging fortunes.

Learn more about Jobs, Steven Paul with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Feb. 24, 1955, San Francisco, Cal., U.S.) U.S. businessman. Adopted in infancy, he grew up in Los Altos. He dropped out of Reed College and went to work for Atari Corp. designing video games. In 1976 he cofounded (with Stephen Wozniak) Apple Computer (incorporated in 1977; now Apple Inc.). The first Apple computer, created when Jobs was only 21, changed the public's idea of a computer from a huge machine for scientific use to a home appliance that could be used by anyone. Apple's Macintosh computer, which appeared in 1984, introduced a graphical user interface and mouse technology that became the standard for all applications interfaces. In 1980 Apple became a public corporation, and Jobs became the company's chairman. Management conflicts led him to leave Apple in 1985 to form NeXT Computer Inc., but he returned to Apple in 1996 and became CEO in 1997. The striking new iMac computer (1998) revived the company's flagging fortunes.

Learn more about Jobs, Steven Paul with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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.jobs is a top-level internet domain format approved by ICANN on April 8, 2005 as a sponsored TLD as part of the second group of new TLD applications submitted in 2004. It is restricted to employment-related sites. It entered the root in September, 2005, and began accepting registrations later in the year.

The intended use is for companies and organizations to register some version of their corporate names in the .jobs domain and use it for a site specifically aimed at those seeking employment with that company, as distinguished from general corporate and marketing sites in other top level domains such as .com. For instance, asda.jobs is a site giving information about jobs available at British supermarket chain Asda. The licensed operator of the .jobs domain format is Employ Media LLC.

It has been suggested that subdomains of other domains, such as jobs.example.com, can be used without requiring any new registrations on the part of the companies involved. However, companies have not standardized on any such scheme for naming their job sites, so the proponents of .jobs feel it can gain a market presence by allowing recruiters to communicate a simple, direct URL destination of employment opportunities to job seekers.

The rules of registration in .jobs are designed to prevent abuses by non-qualified parties by way of its validating each request for registration. Unlike .com and most other top-level domains, .jobs does not offer real-time registrations.

Example of use

In late 2005, katrina.jobs was set up by CareerBuilder as a source for job information for those affected by Hurricane Katrina.

External links

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