Hutchinson

Hutchinson

[huhch-in-suhn]
Hutchinson, Anne, c.1591-1643, religious leader in New England, b. Anne Marbury in Lincolnshire, England. She emigrated (1634) with her husband and family to Massachusetts Bay, where her brilliant mind and her kindness won admiration and a following. The informal discussions at her home gave scope to Puritan intellects, but her espousal of the covenant of grace as opposed to the covenant of works (i.e., she tended to believe that faith alone was necessary to salvation) and her claim that she could identify the elect among the colonists caused John Cotton, John Winthrop, and other former friends to view her as an antinomian heretic. She defied them, was tried by the General Court, and was sentenced (1637) to banishment for "traducing the ministers." Several of her followers—including William Coddington, John Wheelwright, John Underhill, and John Clarke—also left Massachusetts Bay. After helping Coddington to found the present Portsmouth, R.I., she quarreled with him and, with Samuel Gorton, ousted him in 1639. After Coddington's return to power, she moved (1642) to Long Island and then to what is now Pelham Bay Park in New York City. There she and all the other members of her family but one were killed by Native Americans.

See W. K. Rugg, Unafraid (1930, repr. 1970); E. J. Battis, Saints and Sectaries (1962); F. J. Bremer, Anne Hutchinson (1981); A. S. Lang, Prophetic Woman: Anne Hutchinson and the Problem of Dissent in the Literature of New England (1987); E. LaPlante, American Jezebel: The Uncommon Life of Anne Hutchinson, the Woman Who Defied the Puritans (2004).

Hutchinson, Thomas, 1711-80, colonial governor of Massachusetts (1771-74) and historian, b. Boston. A descendant of Anne Hutchinson, he was a man of wealth and prominence, of learning, and of notable integrity. He entered public life when he became (1737) a member of the General Court, the Massachusetts legislature. When the cost of the Louisburg campaign was repaid to Massachusetts, he proposed (1748) that the money be used to redeem the colony's depreciated currency. The plan, which was ultimately successful in stimulating trade, caused Hutchinson to lose the election in 1749 and aligned him with the conservatives. He was a member of the governor's council (1749-66), a delegate to the Albany Congress (1754), chief justice (1760-61), and lieutenant governor (1758-71). When he was appointed royal governor in 1771, Hutchinson was perhaps the most powerful man in the colony, but he had bitter political enemies among the radicals, notably Samuel Adams. Though he considered the Stamp Act and other government measures unwise, he had favored strict enforcement, and his unpopularity caused a mob to sack and burn his mansion in 1765. His unpopularity increased after he became governor, and he favored strenuous measures against the growing discontent. These views were exposed when letters he had written to English friends were made public. In 1773 he refused to let the tea-laden ships clear Boston Harbor and thus brought on the Boston Tea Party. As tension grew worse he was replaced as governor by Gen. Thomas Gage and moved to England. He was the author of an accurate, scholarly, and useful book, The History of the Colony and Province of Massachusetts Bay (3 vol., 1764-1828; modern ed. by L. S. Mayo, 1936).

See his diary and letters (ed. by P. O. Hutchinson, 1883-86, repr. 1971); study by B. Bailyn (1974).

Hutchinson, city (1990 pop. 39,308), seat of Reno co., S central Kans., on the Arkansas River; inc. 1872. It is a commercial and industrial center in a grain (especially wheat), livestock, and oil region. There is grain milling (Hutchinson has a giant grain elevator, over half a mile long), and the manufacture of vehicle parts, fuel tanks, bakery products, industrial valves, welding supplies, asphalt, and ambulances. Salt is extracted from great beds beneath the city. The Kansas Cosmophere and Space Center and the Kansas state fairgrounds are there.

(born Sept. 9, 1711, Boston, Mass.—died June 3, 1780, London, Eng.) American colonial administrator. The son of a wealthy Boston merchant, he pursued business ventures before serving in local and provincial legislatures (1737–49) and as a delegate to the Albany Congress. He served as lieutenant governor (1758–71) and as chief justice of the state Superior Court (1760–69). As governor (1771–74), he strictly enforced British rule. After he was accused of initiating the hated Stamp Act, a mob attacked his home, and he barely escaped with his life. His insistence that a shipment of tea be landed in Boston led to the Boston Tea Party. He was replaced as governor by Gen. Thomas Gage.

Learn more about Hutchinson, Thomas with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Sept. 9, 1711, Boston, Mass.—died June 3, 1780, London, Eng.) American colonial administrator. The son of a wealthy Boston merchant, he pursued business ventures before serving in local and provincial legislatures (1737–49) and as a delegate to the Albany Congress. He served as lieutenant governor (1758–71) and as chief justice of the state Superior Court (1760–69). As governor (1771–74), he strictly enforced British rule. After he was accused of initiating the hated Stamp Act, a mob attacked his home, and he barely escaped with his life. His insistence that a shipment of tea be landed in Boston led to the Boston Tea Party. He was replaced as governor by Gen. Thomas Gage.

Learn more about Hutchinson, Thomas with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Anne Marbury

(baptized July 20, 1591, Alford, Lincolnshire, Eng.—died August or September 1643, Pelham Bay, N.Y.) Anglo-American religious leader. In 1612 she married William Hutchinson, and they followed John Cotton to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634. She organized weekly meetings of Boston women to discuss recent sermons and to express their own theological views. Before long, ministers and magistrates were attracted to her sessions, at which she criticized the narrow Puritan orthodoxy and espoused a “covenant of grace.” Her opponents accused her of believing that God's grace had freed Christians from the need to observe established moral precepts. Tried for “traducing the ministers,” she was sentenced to banishment; refusing to recant, she was excommunicated. In 1638 she and her husband established a colony at Aquidneck Island, which became part of Rhode Island.

Learn more about Hutchinson, Anne with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Anne Marbury

(baptized July 20, 1591, Alford, Lincolnshire, Eng.—died August or September 1643, Pelham Bay, N.Y.) Anglo-American religious leader. In 1612 she married William Hutchinson, and they followed John Cotton to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634. She organized weekly meetings of Boston women to discuss recent sermons and to express their own theological views. Before long, ministers and magistrates were attracted to her sessions, at which she criticized the narrow Puritan orthodoxy and espoused a “covenant of grace.” Her opponents accused her of believing that God's grace had freed Christians from the need to observe established moral precepts. Tried for “traducing the ministers,” she was sentenced to banishment; refusing to recant, she was excommunicated. In 1638 she and her husband established a colony at Aquidneck Island, which became part of Rhode Island.

Learn more about Hutchinson, Anne with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Hutchinson may refer to:

People

Places

United States

Other uses

See also

Search another word or see hutchinsonon Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature