hospice

hospice

[hos-pis]
hospice, program of humane and supportive care for the terminally ill and their families; the term also applies to a professional facility that provides care to dying patients who can no longer be cared for at home. Hospice is an alternative to hospitalization that emphasizes home care for as long as possible; relief from pain; an attractive, noninstitutional environment if the patient can no longer be cared for at home; and personal and family counseling. The hospice movement was pioneered by Dr. Cicely Saunders, founder of St. Christopher's Hospice (opened 1967), London, and furthered by Dr. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross's work with the dying.

Home or hospital for relieving physical and emotional suffering of dying persons. In patients expected to live only months or weeks, hospice care offers an alternative to aggressive life-prolonging measures, which often only increase discomfort and isolation. Hospices provide a sympathetic environment in which prevention (not just control) of physical pain has top priority, along with patients' emotional and spiritual needs. Care may be provided in a health facility, on an outpatient basis, or at home.

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Hospice-Anthelme Verreau (6 September 182815 May 1901) was a French-Canadian priest, educator, and historian.

Born in l'Islet, P.Q., Lower Canada, the son of Germain-Alexandre Verreau and Ursule Fournier, Verreau left his classical course at the Quebec Seminary and taught at Ste Thérèse College. In 1857, he was appointed principal of the newly founded Jacques-Cartier Normal School, an office he held until his death. He was made a Lit.D. of Laval (1878) and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. In 1873 he was commissioned by the Quebec Government to investigate certain European archives for materials relating to Canadian history. Besides many contributions to the Historical Society of Montreal, of which he was the first president, and to the Royal Society of Canada, he published (1870-73) two volumes of memoirs concerning the invasion of Canada by the Americans.

He died in Montreal, Quebec in 1901.

Chief publications

  • Notice sur la fondation de Montréal;
  • Des commencements de l'église du Canada;
  • Jacques Cartier; Questions du calendrier civil et ecclésiastique; Questions de droit politique, de législation et d'usages maritimes

Sources

  • Henry James Morgan, Bibliotheca canadensis (Toronto, 1898);
  • Henri-Raymond Casgrain, Annuaire de l'Universite Laval (Quebec, 1902);
  • Adélard Desrosiers, Les Ecoles Normales de la Prov. De Quebec (Montreal, 1909).

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