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Magic: The Gathering World Championship

Magic: The Gathering World Championships
Year Winner Held in
1994 Zak Dolan (USA) Milwaukee, WI, USA
1995 Alexander Blumke (Switzerland) Seattle, WA, USA
1996 Tom Chanpheng (Australia) Seattle, WA, USA
1997 Jakub Slemr (Czech Republic) Seattle, WA, USA
1998 Brian Selden (USA) Seattle, WA, USA
1999 Kai Budde (Germany) Yokohama, Japan
2000 Jon Finkel (USA) Brussels, Belgium
2001 Tom van de Logt (Netherlands) Toronto, Canada
2002 Carlos Eduardo Romão (Brazil) Sydney, Australia
2003 Daniel Zink (Germany) Berlin, Germany
2004 Julien Nuijten (Netherlands) San Francisco, CA, USA
2005 Katsuhiro Mori (Japan) Yokohama, Japan
2006 Makihito Mihara (Japan) Paris, France
2007 Uri Peleg (Israel) New York City, NY, USA

The Magic: The Gathering World Championships ("Worlds") have been held annually since 1994. Originally open to all competitors, with the introduction of the Magic: The Gathering Pro Tour, the World Championships tournament is now an invitation-only event and the last Pro Tour "stop" of each season. The invitees are:

  • Current World Champion
  • 2nd to 8th place finishers from the previous World Championship.
  • Current Pro Player of the Year.
  • For countries that hold an invitation-only National Championship, the three members of each national team and that team’s designated alternate (see "National Team Composition" ).
  • For countries that hold an open National Championship, the winner of that National Championship (see "Open Nationals Invitations to Worlds").
  • Players with Pro Tour Players Club level 3 or higher. (This includes all members of the Hall of Fame.)
  • Top 50 DCI Composite–ranked players from the APAC (Asian-Pacific) region.
  • Top 50 DCI Composite–ranked players from the Europe region.
  • Top 50 DCI Composite–ranked players from the Latin America region.
  • Top 50 DCI Composite–ranked players from the North America region.

(Compare Magic Premier Event Invitation Policy). In recent years, the tournament location has alternated between North America, Asia-Pacific, and Europe.

The 2007 World Championship

(Complete Coverage)

Uri Peleg - 2007 World Championship
Doran Rock
Main Deck: Sideboard:
4 Birds of Paradise
4 Doran, the Siege Tower
1 Hypnotic Specter
3 Llanowar Elves
4 Ohran Viper
3 Shriekmaw
4 Tarmogoyf

2 Eyeblight's Ending
3 Garruk Wildspeaker
1 Liliana Vess
2 Nameless Inversion
2 Profane Command
4 Thoughtseize

1 Brushland
3 Caves of Koilos
1 Forest
2 Gemstone Mine
4 Gilt-Leaf Palace
1 Horizon Canopy
4 Llanowar Wastes
1 Pendelhaven
4 Treetop Village
2 Urborg, Tomb of Yawgmoth

2 Cloudthresher
2 Loxodon Warhammer
2 Nath of the Gilt-Leaf
1 Oblivion Ring
3 Riftsweeper
2 Serrated Arrows
1 Shriekmaw
2 Stupor

The 2007 Magic: the Gathering World Championship took place from December 6-9, 2007 at the Jacob K. Javits Center of New York in New York City, USA. The top 64 individual finishers received $215,600 in prize money.

The winner of the tournament was Uri Peleg (Israel), defeating Patrick Chapin (USA) 3-1 in the finals. Katsuhiro Mori made the top 8 for the third consecutive year, while Gabriel Nassif made his second consecutive trip to the top 8. Coincidentally, each player mirrored their performance from the previous year (Mori was eliminated in the quarter-finals, Nassif in the semi-finals).Finishing Order

  1. Uri Peleg (Israel)
  2. Patrick Chapin (USA)
  3. Gabriel Nassif (France)
  4. Koutarou Ootsuka (Japan)
  5. Cristoph Huber (Switzerland)
  6. Yoshitaka Nakano (Japan)
  7. Katsuhiro Mori (Japan)
  8. Roel van Heeswijk (The Netherlands)Team Competition
  9. Team Switzerland - Nico Bohny, Manuel Bucher, Christoph Huber, Gennari Raphael
  10. Team Austria - Thomas Preyer, David Reitbauer, Stefan Stradner, Helmut Summersberger

The 2006 World Championship

(Complete Coverage)

Makihito Mihara - 2006 World Championship
Dragonstorm
Main Deck: Sideboard:
4 Bogardan Hellkite
2 Hunted Dragon

4 Dragonstorm
4 Lotus Bloom
4 Telling Time
4 Seething Song
4 Sleight of Hand
4 Rite of Flame
4 Gigadrowse
4 Remand

1 Dreadship Reef
1 Calciform Pools
8 Island
4 Steam Vents
4 Mountain
4 Shivan Reef

1 Trickbind
3 Pyroclasm
1 Calciform Pools
2 Dreadship Reef
3 Ignorant Bliss
4 Repeal
1 Teferi, Mage of Zhalfir

The 2006 Magic World Championship took place from November 29-December 3, 2006 at the Carrousel du Louvre in Paris, France. The total prize money awarded to the top 75 finishers was $255,245 USD.

The winner of this tournament was Makihito Mihara (Japan), who defeated Ryou Ogura (Japan) 3-0 in the finals. He piloted a combination deck based on the card Dragonstorm. It is the first time players from the same country have been World Champion in back-to-back seasons, and only the Dutch kept the Japanese from sweeping the world awards again.Finishing Order

  1. Makihito Mihara (Japan)
  2. Ryou Ogura (Japan)
  3. Nicholas Lovett (Wales)
  4. Gabriel Nassif (France)
  5. Paulo Carvalho (Portugal)
  6. Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa (Brazil)
  7. Tiago Chan (Portugal)
  8. Katsuhiro Mori (Japan)Team Competition
  9. Team Netherlands - Kamiel Cornelissen, Julien Nuijten, Robert Van Medevoort
  10. Team Japan - Katsuhiro Mori, Shuuhei Yamamoto, Hidenori KatayamaPlayer of the Year
  11. Shouta Yasooka (Japan)
  12. Shuuhei Nakamura (Japan)
  13. Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa (Brazil)

Rookie of the Year: Sebastian Thaler (Germany)

The 2005 World Championship

( Complete coverage)

Katsuhiro Mori - 2005 World Championship
Ghazi Glare
Main Deck: Sideboard:
2 Yosei, The Morning Star
3 Arashi the Sky Asunder
1 Birds of Paradise
4 Selesnya Guildmage
4 Wood Elves
4 Loxodon Hierarch
3 Kodama of the North Tree
3 Llanowar Elves

3 Pithing Needle
3 Umezawa's Jitte
2 Congregation at Dawn
3 Glare of Subdual
2 Seed Spark

4 Vitu-Ghazi, The City Tree
4 Selesnya Sanctuary
1 Okina, Temple to the Grandfathers
4 Brushland
5 Forest
4 Temple Garden
1 Plains

2 Greater Good
1 Kodama of the North Tree
2 Naturalize
2 Carven Caryatid
1 Seedborn Muse
1 Wrath of God
1 Kodama's Reach
2 Yosei, the Morning Star
3 Hokori, Dust Drinker

The 2005 World Championship was held from November 30 to December 4 at the Pacifico Yokohama in Yokohama, Japan. The total prize money awarded to the top 64 finishers was $208,130 USD.

The winner of this tournament was Katsuhiro Mori (Japan), who defeated Frank Karsten (Netherlands) 3-1 in the finals. He used a Japanese made deck called "Ghazi-Glare"

This was truly Japan's year, as they won World Championships, Team Championships, and the Player of the Year race. The only other country to accomplish this is the U.S.Finishing Order

  1. Katsuhiro Mori (Japan)
  2. Frank Karsten (Netherlands)
  3. Tomohiro Kaji (Japan)
  4. Akira Asahara (Japan)
  5. Marcio Carvalho (Portugal)
  6. Ding Leong (Singapore)
  7. Shuuhei Nakamura (Japan)
  8. Andre Coimbra (Portugal)Team Competition
  9. Team Japan - Takuma Morofuji, Ichirou Shimura, Masashi Oiso
  10. Team U.S.A. - Antonio De Rosa, Neil Reeves, Jon SonnePlayer of the Year Race
  11. Kenji Tsumura (Japan)
  12. Olivier Ruel (France)
  13. Masashi Oiso (Japan)

Rookie of the Year: Pierre Canali (France)

The 2004 World Championship

Julien Nuijten - 2004 World Championship
W/G Slide
Main Deck: Sideboard:
4 Viridian Shaman
4 Eternal Witness
4 Eternal Dragon

4 Wrath of God
4 Renewed Faith
4 Astral Slide
2 Akroma's Vengeance
2 Decree of Justice
1 Plow Under
2 Wing Shards
4 Rampant Growth

4 Secluded Steppe
4 Tranquil Thicket
4 Windswept Heath
6 Plains
7 Forest
4 Oxidize
2 Rude Awakening
3 Scrabbling Claws
3 Circle of Protection: Red
3 Plow Under
( Complete coverage)

The 2004 World Championship was held from September 1 to September 5 at the Fort Mason Center in San Francisco, California, USA. The total prize money awarded to the top 64 finishers was $208,130 USD.

This was the first ever World Championships without a player from the United States in the Top 8. Julien Nuijten, at 15 years old, became the youngest ever Pro Tour winner and took home a total of $52,366 - a new record for winnings in a single collectible card game tournament.Finishing order

  1. Julien Nuijten (Netherlands)
  2. Aeo Paquette (Canada)
  3. Ryou Ogura (Japan)
  4. Manuel Bevand (France)
  5. Kamiel Cornelissen (Netherlands)
  6. Terry Han Chuen Soh (Malaysia)
  7. Gabriel Nassif (France)
  8. Murray "the Mauler" Evans (Canada)


Team Finals

  1. Team Germany - Torben Twiefel, Roland Bode, Sebastian Zink
  2. Team Belgium - Vincent Lemoine, Dilson Ramos Da Fonseca, Geoffery SironPlayer of the Year Race
  3. Gabriel Nassif (France)
  4. Nicolai Herzog (Norway)
  5. Rickard Osterberg (Norway)

Rookie of the Year: Julien Nuijten (Netherlands)

The 2003 World Championship

Daniel Zink - 2003 World Championship
Wake
Main Deck: Sideboard:
4 Mana Leak
1 Circular Logic
4 Wrath of God
2 Vengeful Dreams
3 Moment's Peace
3 Renewed Faith
3 Mirari's Wake
1 Mirari
4 Deep Analysis
3 Compulsion
3 Cunning Wish
2 Decree of Justice
4 Krosan Verge
4 Skycloud Expanse
4 Forest
4 Plains
7 Island
2 Flooded Strand
2 Elfhame Palace
1 Vengeful Dreams
1 Hunting Pack
1 Wing Shards
1 Circular Logic
1 Ray of Distorion
1 Renewed Faith
1 Krosan Reclamation
2 Exalted Angel
3 Ray of Revelation
3 Anurid Brushhopper
( Complete coverage)

The 2003 World Championship was held from August 6 to August 10 at the Estrel Hotel in Berlin, Germany. German player Daniel Zink managed to emerge as the new world champion, beating Japan's Jin Okamoto 3-0 in the finals and taking home 35,000 USD in the process. The total prize money awarded to the top 64 finishers was $208,130 USD.Finishing order

  1. Daniel Zink (Germany)
  2. Jin Okamoto (Japan)
  3. Tuomo Nieminen (Finland)
  4. Dave Humpherys (United States)
  5. Jeroen Remie (Netherlands)
  6. Peer Kröger (Germany)
  7. Wolfgang Eder (Germany)
  8. Gabe Walls (United States)


Team Finals

  1. Team U.S.A - Gabe Walls, Justin Gary, Joshua Wagner
  2. Team Finland - Tuomo Nieminen, Arho Toikka, Tomi WalamiesPlayer of the Year Race
  3. Kai Budde (Germany)
  4. Justin Gary (USA)
  5. Mattias Jorstedt (Sweden)

Rookie of the Year: Masashi Oiso (Japan)

The 2002 World Championship

Carlos Romão - 2002 World Championship
Psychatog
Main Deck: Sideboard:
4 Nightscape Familiar
4 Psychatog
3 Chainers Edict
3 Circular Logic
4 Counterspell
3 Cunning Wish
3 Deep Analysis
3 Fact or Fiction
3 Memory Lapse
4 Repulse
2 Upheaval
10 Island
2 Cephalid Coliseum
1 Darkwater Catacombs
4 Salt Marsh
3 Swamp
4 Underground River
1 Coffin Purge
4 Duress
1 Fact or Fiction
1 Gainsay
3 Ghastly Demise
1 Hibernation
1 Mana Short
1 Recoil
1 Slay
1 Teferis Response
( Complete coverage)

The 2002 World Championship was held from August 13 to August 18 2002 at Fox Studios in Sydney, Australia; 24-year old Carlos "Jaba" Romão from São Paulo, Brazil came out as world champion, garnering a prize of 35,000 USD with the help of his blue/black "Psychatog" deck.

Finishing order :

  1. Carlos Eduardo Romão (Brazil)
  2. Mark Ziegner (Germany)
  3. Diego Ostrovich (Argentina)
  4. Dave Humpherys (USA)
  5. Sim Han How (Malaysia)
  6. John Larkin (Ireland)
  7. Tuomas Kotiranta (Finland)
  8. Ken Krouner (USA)


The 2001 World Championship

Tom van de Logt - 2001 World Championship
Machine Head
Main Deck: Sideboard:
4 Plague Spitter
3 Phyrexian Scuta
3 Skizzik
2 Flametongue Kavu
2 Crypt Angel
4 Blazing Specter
4 Duress
4 Dark Ritual
4 Terminate
3 Vendetta
3 Urza's Rage
6 Swamp
6 Mountain
4 Rishadan Port
4 Urborg Volcano
4 Sulfurous Springs
4 Scoria Cat
3 Addle
2 Persecute
1 Pyroclasm
3 Phyrexian Arena
1 Flametongue Kavu
1 Crypt Angel
( Complete coverage)

The 2001 World Championship was held from August 8 to August 12 2001 at the Metro Toronto Convention Center in Toronto, Canada; Tom van de Logt from the Netherlands came out as the new world champion, garnering a prize of 35,000 USD for his victory (as well as another 1,000 USD for the success of the Dutch team he was part of). Other finalists included future World Series of Poker bracelet winner Alex Borteh from the USA (2nd place), Antoine Ruel from France (3rd place) and Andrea Santin from Italy (4th place), as well as Michael Turian from the USA (5th place), Jan Tomcani from Slovakia (6th place), Tommi Hovi from Finland (7th place) and John Ormerod from England (8th place).
Finishing Order

  1. Tom van de Logt (Netherlands)
  2. Alex Borteh (U.S.)
  3. Antoine Ruel (France)
  4. Andrea Santin (Italy)
  5. Michael Turian (U.S.)
  6. Jan Tomcani (Slovakia)
  7. Tommi Hovi (Finland)
  8. John Ormerod (England)

Note: John Ormerod did not make the top 8 finishers, but was awarded 8th after David Williams was disqualified for a marked deck.

The 2000 World Championship

Jon Finkel - 2000 World Championship
Tinker
Main Deck: Sideboard:
1 Crumbling Sanctuary
4 Grim Monolith
4 Masticore
4 Metalworker
1 Mishra's Helix
1 Phyrexian Colossus
4 Phyrexian Processor
4 Tangle Wire
4 Thran Dynamo
4 Voltaic Key
4 Brainstorm
4 Tinker
4 Crystal Vein
9 Island
4 Rishadan Port
4 Saprazzan Skerry
4 Annul
4 Chill
4 Miscalculation
2 Rising Waters
1 Mishra's Helix
1st place - Jon Finkel (U.S.)
2nd place - Bob Maher, jr. (U.S.)
3rd place - Dominik Hothow (Germany)
4th place - Benedikt Klauser (Austria)

The 1999 World Championship

Kai Budde - 1999 World Championship
Wildfire
Main Deck: Sideboard:
4 Cursed Scroll
4 Fire Diamond
4 Grim Monolith
3 Masticore
1 Karn, Silver Golem
2 Mishra's Helix
4 Temporal Aperture
4 Thran Dynamo
4 Voltaic Key
2 Worn Powerstone
4 Covetous Dragon
4 Wildfire
3 Ancient Tomb
4 City of Traitors
13 Mountains
2 Boil
3 Earthquake
2 Rack and Ruin
2 Shattering Pulse
4 Spellshock
1 Mishra's Helix
1 Phyrexian Processor
1st place - Kai Budde (Germany)
2nd place - Mark Le Pine (U.S.)
3rd place - Raffaele Lo Moro (Italy)
4th place - Matt Linde (U.S.)

The 1998 World Championship

Brian Selden - 1998 World Championship
RecSur
Main Deck: Sideboard:
2 Scroll Rack
2 Lobotomy
2 Nekrataal
4 Recurring Nightmare
1 Spirit of the Night
1 Thrull Surgeon
1 Man-o-War
1 Tradewind Rider
4 Birds of Paradise
2 Spike Feeder
1 Spike Weaver
4 Survival of the Fittest
2 Uktabi Orangutan
1 Verdant Force
4 Wall of Blossoms
2 Wall of Roots
2 Firestorm
1 Orcish Settlers
1 Cloudchaser Eagle
3 City of Brass
8 Forest
1 Gemstone Mine
2 Karplusan Forest
2 Reflecting Pool
1 Swamp
2 Underground River
2 Undiscovered Paradise
1 Volrath's Stronghold
1 Staunch Defenders
3 Emerald Charm
1 Hall of Gemstone
2 Pyroblast
4 Boil
2 Dread of Night
2 Phyrexian Furnace
1st place - Brian Selden (U.S.)
2nd place - Ben Rubin (U.S.)
3rd place - Jon Finkel (U.S.)
4th place - Raphaël Lévy (France)

The 1997 World Championship

Jakub Slemr - 1997 World Championship
Main Deck: Sideboard:
4 Black Knight
4 Choking Sands
4 Contagion
4 Fallen Askari
4 Knight of Stromgald
1 Necratog
4 Nekrataal
3 Shadow Guildmage
4 Man-o-War
2 Uktabi Orangutan
2 Earthquake
4 Incinerate
3 City of Brass
3 Gemstone Mine
2 Sulfurous Springs
10 Swamp
1 Underground River
3 Undiscovered Paradise
2 Disenchant
1 Exile
1 Honorable Passage
3 Pyroblast
2 Dystopia
2 Ebony Charm
2 Forsaken Wastes
2 Hydroblast
1st place - Jakub Slemr (Czech Republic)
2nd place - Janosch Kühn (Germany)
3rd place - Svend Sparre Geertsen (Denmark)
3rd place - Paul McCabe (Canada)

The 1996 World Championship

Tom Chanpheng - 1996 World Championship
Main Deck: Sideboard:
1 Lodestone Bauble
2 Phyrexian War Beast
1 Zuran Orb
1 Sleight of Mind
1 Armageddon
1 Balance
4 Disenchant
1 Land Tax
4 Order of Leitbur
4 Order of the White Shield
1 Reinforcements
1 Reprisal
4 Savannah Lions
2 Serra Angel
4 Swords to Plowshares
4 White Knight
1 Kjeldoran Outpost
4 Mishra's Factory
15 Plains
4 Strip Mine
2 Arenson's Aura
1 Black Vise
4 Divine Offering
1 Energy Storm
1 Exile
1 Reprisal
1 Spirit Link
1 Sleight of Mind
2 Serrated Arrows
1 Kjeldoran Outpost
1st place - Tom Chanpheng (Australia)
2nd place - Mark Justice (U.S.)
3rd place - Henry Stern (U.S.)
3rd place - Olle Råde (Sweden)

Note that Chanpeng's winning deck included no sources of blue mana, though includes "Sleight of Mind". This stems from an error in his submitted decklist. He was forced to use plains in lieu of the 4 Adarkar Wastes he had planned to include.

Tom's victory was commemorated with a unique card

The 1995 World Championship

Alexander Blumke - 1995 World Championship
Main Deck: Sideboard:
1 Disrupting Scepter
2 Icy Manipulator
3 The Rack
2 Zuran Orb
3 Dance of the Dead
1 Dark Banishing
4 Dark Ritual
4 Hymn to Tourach
3 Hypnotic Specter
1 Mind Twist
1 Pestilence
1 Royal Assassin
2 Sengir Vampire
2 Terror
1 Power Sink
1 Balance
3 Disenchant
1 Land Tax
1 Spirit Link
1 Swords to Plowshares
3 Adarkar Wastes
1 Bottomless Vault
4 Mishra's Factory
3 Plains
1 Strip Mine
12 Swamp
1 Underground River
1 CoP Artifact
1 CoP Black
2 CoP Red
1 Land Tax
1 Prismatic Ward
4 Gloom
2 Stromgald Khabal
1 Blue Elemental Blast
1 Magical Hack
1 Sleight of Mind
1st place - Alexander Blumke (Switzerland)
2nd place - Marc Hernandez (France)
3rd place - Mark Justice (US)
4th place - Henry Stern (US)

The 1994 World Championship

Zak Dolan - 1994 World Championship
Main Deck: Sideboard:
1 Black Vise
1 Howling Mine
1 Icy Manipulator
1 Ivory Tower
2 Meekstone
1 Winter Orb
1 Ancestral Recall
1 Clone
1 Control Magic
1 Mana Drain
2 Old Man of the Sea
1 Recall
1 Siren's Call
2 Stasis
1 Time Elemental
1 Timetwister
1 Time Walk
1 Vesuvan Doppelganger
1 Birds of Paradise
1 Ley Druid
1 Regrowth
1 Armageddon
2 Disenchant
1 Kismet
4 Serra Angel
4 Swords to Plowshares
1 Wrath of God
1 Library of Alexandria
4 Savannah
2 Strip Mine
4 Tropical Island
4 Tundra

1 Black Lotus
1 Mox Emerald
1 Mox Ruby
1 Mox Pearl
1 Mox Sapphire
1 Mox Jet
1 Sol Ring
1 Mana Vault

1 Chaos Orb
1 CoP Red
1 Copy Artifact
1 Diamond Valley
1 In the Eye of Chaos
1 Floral Spuzzem
2 Karma
1 Magical Hack
1 Powersink
1 Presence of the Master
1 Reverse Damage
1 Sleight of Mind
1 Kismet
1 Winter Blast
1st place - Zak Dolan (US)
2nd place - Bestrand Lestrée (France)
3rd place - Dominic Symens (Belgium)
4th place - Cyrille de Foucaud (France)

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