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Harriet Monroe

Harriet Monroe

[muhn-roh]
Monroe, Harriet, 1860-1936, American editor, critic, and poet, b. Chicago. In 1912 she founded Poetry: a Magazine of Verse, which paid and encouraged both established and new poets. Monroe's literary reputation is based on her editorship of this important magazine. She introduced to readers such writers as Carl Sandburg, Rabindranath Tagore, Vachel Lindsay, Rupert Brooke, and Robert Frost. Her own works include several volumes of poetry; her essays Poets and Their Art (1933); the anthology she compiled with Alice Corbin Henderson, The New Poetry (1917); and her autobiography, A Poet's Life (1938).

See study by D. J. Cahill (1974).

Harriet Monroe (12 December 186026 September 1936) was an American editor, scholar, literary critic, and patron of the arts. She is best known as the founder and long time editor of Poetry Magazine. Monroe was born in Chicago, Illinois and died in Arequipa, Peru.

She was the first editor at Poetry Magazine, when it was founded in 1912. From her position as editor, she played a role in the development of modern poetry, both as an early publisher and as a supporter of poets such as Ezra Pound, H. D., T. S. Eliot, William Carlos Williams, Carl Sandburg and others.

Additionally, Monroe was a long time correspondent of the poets she supported, and her letters provide a wealth of information on the thoughts and motives of modernist poets.

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