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Halsted

Halsted

[hawl-stid, -sted]
Halsted, William Stewart, 1852-1922, American surgeon, b. New York City, M.D. College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1877. He practiced in New York and in 1886 became the first professor of surgery at Johns Hopkins, where he was associated with Sir William Osler, W. H. Welch, and H. A. Kelly in developing the great medical school and hospital. His surgical contributions include an operative technique based on minimum injury of tissues, anesthesia by the injection of cocaine into the nerves, a method of operating for cancer of the breast and for hernia, experimental work on the thyroid, and the introduction of the use of rubber gloves.

See his Surgical Papers (2 vol., 1924); biography by A. J. Beckhard and W. D. Crane (1960).

(b. Sept. 23, 1852, New York, N.Y., U.S.—d. Sept. 7, 1922, Baltimore, Md.) U.S. pioneer of scientific surgery. He graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1877. In 1881 he discovered that blood could be aerated and reinfused. He developed conduction anesthesia (1885) by experimenting with injecting his own nerve trunks with cocaine, a substance to which he subsequently became addicted (though later cured). At Johns Hopkins University he established the first surgical school in the U.S. An early champion of aseptic procedures, Halsted introduced the use of thin rubber gloves in surgery (1890). He emphasized homeostasis during surgery, gentleness in handling living tissue, and precise realignment of severed tissues. He originated the practice of hospital surgical residencies.

Learn more about Halsted, William S(tewart) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(b. Sept. 23, 1852, New York, N.Y., U.S.—d. Sept. 7, 1922, Baltimore, Md.) U.S. pioneer of scientific surgery. He graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1877. In 1881 he discovered that blood could be aerated and reinfused. He developed conduction anesthesia (1885) by experimenting with injecting his own nerve trunks with cocaine, a substance to which he subsequently became addicted (though later cured). At Johns Hopkins University he established the first surgical school in the U.S. An early champion of aseptic procedures, Halsted introduced the use of thin rubber gloves in surgery (1890). He emphasized homeostasis during surgery, gentleness in handling living tissue, and precise realignment of severed tissues. He originated the practice of hospital surgical residencies.

Learn more about Halsted, William S(tewart) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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