Goldman

Goldman

[gohld-muhn]
Goldman, Edwin Franko, 1878-1956, American bandmaster and composer, b. Louisville, Ky.; pupil of Dvořák at the National Conservatory of Music, New York City. He played solo cornet in the Metropolitan Opera orchestra (1899-1909) and in 1911 organized his first band. In 1918 he inaugurated a series of public outdoor concerts. He composed over 100 marches and commissioned many works from leading composers. His son, Richard Franko Goldman, 1911-80, who succeeded him as leader of the Goldman band, was also a composer and writer on music. Since his death, the group, renamed the Goldman Memorial Band and led by Gene Young until 1997 and by David Eaton thereafter, has contined to perform.
Goldman, Emma, 1869-1940, American anarchist, b. Lithuania. She emigrated to Rochester, N.Y., in 1886 and worked there in clothing factories. After 1889 she was active in the anarchist movement, and her speeches attracted attention throughout the United States. In 1893, Goldman was imprisoned for inciting to riot. From 1906 she was associated with Alexander Berkman in publishing the anarchist paper Mother Earth. In 1916 she was imprisoned for publicly advocating birth control, and in 1917 for obstructing the draft. With Berkman, Goldman was deported in 1919 to Russia but left that country in 1921 because of her disagreement with the Bolshevik government. In 1926 she married James Colton, a Welshman. She was permitted to reenter the United States for a lecture tour in 1934 on condition that she refrain from public discussion of politics. She took an active part in the Spanish civil war in 1936. She died in Toronto.

See her Living My Life (1931). Other writings include Anarchism and Other Essays (1911), Social Significance of Modern Drama (1914), and My Disillusionment in Russia (1923). See biographies by R. Drinnon (1961) and A. Shulman (1971).

(born June 27, 1869, Kovno, Lith., Russian Empire—died May 14, 1940, Toronto, Ont., Can.) International anarchist. She immigrated to the U.S. in 1885, settling in Rochester, N.Y. Moving to New York City in 1889, she formed a close association with the Russian anarchist Alexander Berkman (1870–1936); the two corresponded regularly during Berkman's imprisonment (1892–1906) for an assassination attempt on Henry Clay Frick. In 1893 Goldman herself was jailed for inciting a riot when a group of unemployed workers reacted to a fiery speech she had delivered. She founded and edited (1906–17) the anarchist magazine Mother Earth and wrote on anarchism, feminism, birth control, and other social problems. After Berkman's release she continued anarchist activities with him until 1917, when they were arrested for agitating against the military draft. Upon her release in 1919, she and other anarchists were deported to the Soviet Union. She moved to England in 1921 and later to Canada and Spain, continuing to lecture throughout Europe.

Learn more about Goldman, Emma with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born June 27, 1869, Kovno, Lith., Russian Empire—died May 14, 1940, Toronto, Ont., Can.) International anarchist. She immigrated to the U.S. in 1885, settling in Rochester, N.Y. Moving to New York City in 1889, she formed a close association with the Russian anarchist Alexander Berkman (1870–1936); the two corresponded regularly during Berkman's imprisonment (1892–1906) for an assassination attempt on Henry Clay Frick. In 1893 Goldman herself was jailed for inciting a riot when a group of unemployed workers reacted to a fiery speech she had delivered. She founded and edited (1906–17) the anarchist magazine Mother Earth and wrote on anarchism, feminism, birth control, and other social problems. After Berkman's release she continued anarchist activities with him until 1917, when they were arrested for agitating against the military draft. Upon her release in 1919, she and other anarchists were deported to the Soviet Union. She moved to England in 1921 and later to Canada and Spain, continuing to lecture throughout Europe.

Learn more about Goldman, Emma with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Goldman is a tiny ghost town in Jefferson County, Missouri, about 25 miles south of St. Louis, Missouri and five miles north of the county courthouse at Hillsboro, Missouri. Goldman is located on Old Lemay Ferry Road, an old trade route connecting Hillsboro and St. Louis.

Goldman is adjacent to the historic Sandy Creek Covered Bridge, the only remaining covered bridge in eastern Missouri and a state historic site.

The town is the site where Missouri Governor Mel Carnahan and two other people perished on October 17 2000, in an airplane crash.

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