Definitions

golden-fizz

Fizz (cocktail)

A Fizz is a traditional family of mixed drinks. It is variation on the older Sours family. The defining features of the fizz are an acidic juice (such as lemon or lime juice) and carbonated water.

The first printed reference to a fizz (spelled "fiz") is in the 1887 edition of Jerry Thomas' Bartender's Guide, in which Thomas lists six fizz recipes.

Gin Fizz

A Gin Fizz is the best-known cocktail in the Fizz family. A Gin Fizz contains gin, lemon juice, sugar, and carbonated water, served in a highball glass with two ice cubes. The drink is similar to a Tom Collins, the difference being that a Tom Collins historically used "Old Tom Gin" (a sweetened version of, and precursor to, London Dry Gin).

Simple variations on the gin fizz are

  • Silver Fizz — addition of egg white
  • Golden Fizz — addition of egg yolk
  • Royal Fizz — addition of whole egg
  • Diamond Fizzsparkling wine instead of carbonated water
  • Green Fizz — addition of a dash of green crème de menthe

Ramos Gin Fizz

A Ramos Gin Fizz (also known as a Ramos Fizz or New Orleans Fizz) contains gin, lemon juice, lime juice, egg white, sugar, cream, orange flower water, and soda water. It is served in a large glass, such as a Zombie glass.

The addition of orange flower water and egg whites has a significant effect on the flavor and texture of the drink as compared with a regular Gin Fizz. The possible danger in using raw egg in the drink means that most bartenders use powdered egg white.

The Ramos gin fizz was invented in 1888 by Henry C. Ramos, at his bar in Meyer's Restaurant. It was originally known as the New Orleans Fizz, and is one of the city's most famous cocktails. Before Prohibition, the bar employed dozens of "shaker boys" to create the drinks during periods of heavy business.

The drink was popularized by the Roosevelt Hotel in New Orleans and governor Huey Long's fondness for the drink. In July 1935, Long brought a bartender named Sam Guarino from the Roosevelt Hotel in New Orleans to the New Yorker Hotel in New York to show the staff there how to make the drink, so that he could have it whenever he was in New York. The Museum of the American Cocktail has newsreel footage of this event. The Roosevelt Hotel group trademarked the drink name in 1935 and continues to make it today (now known as the Fairmont Hotel).

Sloe Gin Fizz

A Sloe Gin Fizz contains sloe gin (a blackthorn plum flavored spirit), lemon juice, sugar, and carbonated water.

The drink is mentioned in the Jack White and Loretta Lynn song "Portland Oregon," with the lines "Well, Portland Oregon and sloe gin fizz, if that ain't love then tell me what is" and "Well, sloe gin fizz works mighty fast, when you drink it by the pitcher and not by the glass." It is not common for the drink to be served by the pitcher, and is illegal in some areas.

Another song which includes a reference is Aerosmith's "Rag Doll", which includes the lyrics "Sloe gin fizzy / do it 'til you're dizzy / give it all you got until you're put out of your misery."

This beverage is also mentioned in Book Two of Richard Wright's novel Native Son as the character Bigger Thomas orders two sloe gin fizzes; one for him and the other for Bessie.

The "sloe gin fizz" shows up, too, in the new Local H album, "12 angry months" in the song, "BMW Man".

The drink is sung of by Sammy Kershaw in his song "Queen of my Double Wide Trailer." "We sat there talkin' by the lobster tank/I ordered her a sloe gin fizz/And when them chicken-fried steaks arrived/She said, 'I like living like this.'"

Uncommon Variations

  • Whiskey Fizz — American blended whiskey, lemon juice, sugar, and lemon-lime soda
  • Manhattan Cooler — Scotch, lemon juice, sugar, and lemon-lime soda
  • Chicago Fizzrum, port wine, lemon juice, sugar, and egg white
  • Buck's Fizz (and variant Mimosa) — champagne, orange juice, sometimes grenadine

See also

References

External links

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