Definitions

globe

globe

[glohb]
globe, spherical map of the earth (terrestrial globe) or the sky (celestial globe). The terrestrial globe provides the only graphic representation of the areas of the earth without significant distortion or inaccuracy in shape, direction, or relative size. However, the flattening of the earth at the poles and its slight bulge below the equator are normally disregarded in the construction of a globe. Probably the earliest globe was constructed by the Greek geographer Crates of Mallus in the 2d cent. B.C. Few attempts were made to construct globes in the Middle Ages, although Strabo and Ptolemy, at the beginning of the Christian era, had formulated precise and detailed instructions for doing so. The first globes of modern times were made in the late 15th cent. by Martin Behaim of Nuremberg and Leonardo da Vinci. One of the earliest globes constructed (1506) after the discovery of America is in the New York Public Library. A celestial globe is a model of the celestial sphere intended primarily to show the positions of the stars.

Large, coarse, herbaceous, thistlelike perennial plant (Cynara scolymus) of the composite family. The thick edible scales and bottom part (heart) of the immature flower heads are a culinary delicacy. The artichoke is native to the Mediterranean and is cultivated extensively in other regions with rich soil and a mild, humid climate. The Jerusalem artichoke is a tuber and does not resemble the artichoke.

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Sunflower (Helianthus tuberosus) native to North America and grown for its edible tubers. The aboveground part of the plant is a coarse, usually multibranched, frost-tender perennial, 7–10 ft (2–3 m) tall. The numerous showy flower heads have yellow ray flowers and yellow, brownish, or purplish disk flowers. The underground tubers vary in shape, size, and colour. Jerusalem artichoke is popular as a cooked vegetable in Europe and has long been cultivated in France as livestock feed. In the U.S. it is rarely cultivated.

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London theatre in which the plays of William Shakespeare were performed after 1599. It was built by two brothers, Cuthbert and Richard Burbage; half the shares were kept by the Burbages, and the rest were assigned equally to Shakespeare and other members of the Chamberlain's Men. The wooden theatre, built in the shape of an O with no roof over the central area, was destroyed by fire in 1613, rebuilt in 1614, and finally pulled down in 1644. Reconstructed (beginning 1987) near the site of the original theatre, the new Globe Theatre inaugurated its first regular season in 1996.

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Globe (Western Apache: Bésh Baa Gowąh) is a city in Gila County, Arizona, United States. According to 2005 Census Bureau estimates, the population of the city is 7,187. The city is the county seat of Gila County. Globe was founded c. 1875 as a mining camp. Mining, tourism, government and retirees are most important in the present-day Globe economy.

Geography

Globe is located at (33.399858, -110.781570).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 18.0 square miles (46.7 km²), of which, 18.0 square miles (46.7 km²) of it is land and 0.06% is water. Globe is adjacent to Miami, Arizona, and the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation. Globe, Miami, and the unincorporated areas nearby (including Inspiration, Claypool and Central Heights-Midland City) are commonly called Globe-Miami.

Globe is the western terminus of U.S. Route 70, which runs east to Atlantic, North Carolina.

Globe is served by the Arizona Eastern Railway, which connects to the Union Pacific Railroad main line at Bowie, Arizona.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 7,486 people, 2,814 households, and 1,871 families residing in the city. The population density was 415.5 people per square mile (160.4/km²). There were 3,172 housing units at an average density of 176.0/sq mi (68.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 77.60% White, 1.15% Black or African American, 3.10% Native American, 1.12% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 14.59% from other races, and 2.40% from two or more races. 32.71% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,814 households out of which 30.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.3% were married couples living together, 12.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.5% were non-families. 30.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the city the population was spread out with 25.8% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 26.5% from 25 to 44, 24.4% from 45 to 64, and 15.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 101.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $33,071, and the median income for a family was $42,280. Males had a median income of $31,404 versus $21,952 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,128. About 8.8% of families and 11.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.8% of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over.

Notable historic buildings

(Extant buildings in italics)

  • Trust building (European Hotel, Terminal Hotel, Pioneer Hotel)-a four-story brick structure that contained apartments, offices, and hotel rooms for rent, built 1906 burned 2005.
  • Old Dominion Hotel-most prominent hotel of downtown Globe; famous for Cactus Room Cocktails and beautiful, huge balconies that hung over the street, built 1905 burned 1981.
  • Gila County Courthouse and Jail-four-story courthouse and adjacent three-story jail behind which many were hung, built 1905, 1909--today it is the Cobre Valley Center for the Arts.
  • Elks Lodge building-the tallest three-story building in the world (it has really high ceilings on each floor)-fired red brick-built 1910-Now an Antique store.
  • Murphy Hotel (Tonto Hotel)-beautiful 1916 hotel that closed in the 1970s and is in need of restoration.
  • Old Dominion Library-built in 1915 as a memorial to miner's deaths in mine accident-it had an amazing outside porch--burned 1981
  • Woolworth building-opened 1916 as FW Woolworth and Company-this was the last Woolworth store to close west of the Mississippi River--now contains United Jewelry Company.
  • Gila Valley Bank and Trust building--a 1909 building designed by Sullivan architects of Chicago-the entire ceiling has the original skylights-now a day spa.
  • Globe Theater -built 1917-art deco theater with copper columns, a balcony, and retro concession stand--burned 2005, but is set to be reconstructed on the original site using original marquee and other architectural features.
  • Alden Theater-an art deco/Spanish colonial theater built around 1910--torn down 1974
  • Holy Angels Catholic Church-1918 church with seven story bell tower-still in operation.
  • Gila Valley, Globe, and Northern Railway Station (Southern Pacific station, Arizona Eastern station)-built 1910/1916--prominent train depot from construction to close in 1950's, now a museum.
  • Central School, built in 1891 (addition in 1912), is the oldest school building still in use in Arizona.
  • Noftsger Hill School is a handsome classical-revival structure, built in 1917. It is presently used as a bed and breakfast inn..
  • Besh-ba-Gowah Pueblo is a reconstructed 14th century Salado Indian ruin, with an archaeological museum adjacent.
  • Gila Pueblo was built as an archaeology center c. 1930 by Harold S. Gladwin. Now used as the Gila Pueblo campus of Eastern Arizona College, the building is on the National Register of Historic Places.
  • Cubitto Jewelry building is the building which housed Cubitto Jewelry from 1905-1996; the building has large original glass windows, original maple floor, skylights, and now contains Simply Sarah, an upscale boutique which carries not only clothing, but ethnic goods and more as well.

Notable residents

See also

Notes

References

  1. Bigando, Robert. Globe, Arizona: The Life and Times of a Western Mining Town 1864- 1917. Globe: American Globe Publishing Co., 1989.

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