Gentileschi

Gentileschi

[jen-tl-es-kee; It. jen-tee-les-kee]
Gentileschi, Artemisia, c.1597-c.1652, Tuscan painter, daughter and pupil of Orazio Gentileschi, b. Rome. She studied under Agostino Tassi, her father's collaborator, who was convicted of raping the teen-age Artemisia in 1612. Over the years, she has been portrayed as a strumpet, a feminist victim or heroine, and an independent woman of her era and her life has been fictionalized in several novels and plays. In purely artistic terms, she achieved renown for her spirited execution and admirable use of chiaroscuro in the style of Caravaggio, and during her life she achieved both success and fame. In 1616 she became the first woman admitted to the Academy of Design in Florence. About 1638 she visited England, where she was in great demand as a portraitist. Among her works are Judith and Holofernes (Uffizi); Mary Magdalen (Pitti Gall., Florence); Christ among the Doctors (N.Y. Historical Society); and a self-portrait (Hampton Court, England).
Gentileschi, Orazio, c.1562-c.1639, Tuscan painter, b. Pisa. His real surname was Lomi, but he adopted his uncle's name. He studied in Rome, where he was associated with Agostino Tassi in the decoration of palace interiors. Influenced by Caravaggio, Gentileschi developed a more softly luminous light and a cooler, more lyrical style. He also painted frescoes in Santa Maria Maggiore and in the Lateran. After spending several years in Genoa and in France, he settled in England (1626) at the invitation of Charles I. Gentileschi's principal works include The Annunciation (San Siro, Genoa); Flight into Egypt (Louvre); Sibyl (Hampton Court, England); and Moses Saved from the Waters (Prado). He also painted numerous portraits. Artemesia Gentileschi was his daughter.
orig. Orazio Lomi

The Annunciation, painting by Orazio Gentileschi, 1623; in the elipsis

(born 1562, Pisa—died Feb. 7, 1639, London) Italian painter. He went to Rome circa 1576–78 and painted frescoes in various churches (circa 1590–1600). His paintings of the early 17th century reveal the influence of Caravaggio's strong chiaroscuro and contemporary figure types; though more refined than Caravaggio's works, they lack the master's power and uncompromising realism. Invited to England by Charles I in 1626, he remained there as court painter the rest of his life. Artemisia Gentileschi was his daughter.

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orig. Orazio Lomi

The Annunciation, painting by Orazio Gentileschi, 1623; in the elipsis

(born 1562, Pisa—died Feb. 7, 1639, London) Italian painter. He went to Rome circa 1576–78 and painted frescoes in various churches (circa 1590–1600). His paintings of the early 17th century reveal the influence of Caravaggio's strong chiaroscuro and contemporary figure types; though more refined than Caravaggio's works, they lack the master's power and uncompromising realism. Invited to England by Charles I in 1626, he remained there as court painter the rest of his life. Artemisia Gentileschi was his daughter.

Learn more about Gentileschi, Orazio with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born July 8, 1593, Rome, Papal States—died 1652/53, Naples, Kingdom of Naples) Italian painter. The daughter of Orazio Gentileschi, she studied with him and with landscape painter Agostino Tassi. Her earliest known work is Susanna and the Elders (1610), formerly attributed to Orazio. She was raped by Tassi, and, when he did not fulfill his promise to marry her, Orazio Gentileschi brought him to trial in 1612. During that event she herself was forced to give evidence under torture. In 1616 she joined the Academy of Design in Florence and began to develop a powerful style of her own. She was one of the greatest of Caravaggio's followers in the Baroque style. Although her compositions were graceful, her subject matter was often violent; she illustrated such subjects as the story from the Apocrypha of the Jewish heroine Judith beheading Holofernes, an invading general. She worked in Rome and Naples and spent three years with her father in London (1638–41). The first woman artist to attain an international reputation, she is admired today as the earliest to show a feminist consciousness in her work.

Learn more about Gentileschi, Artemisia with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born July 8, 1593, Rome, Papal States—died 1652/53, Naples, Kingdom of Naples) Italian painter. The daughter of Orazio Gentileschi, she studied with him and with landscape painter Agostino Tassi. Her earliest known work is Susanna and the Elders (1610), formerly attributed to Orazio. She was raped by Tassi, and, when he did not fulfill his promise to marry her, Orazio Gentileschi brought him to trial in 1612. During that event she herself was forced to give evidence under torture. In 1616 she joined the Academy of Design in Florence and began to develop a powerful style of her own. She was one of the greatest of Caravaggio's followers in the Baroque style. Although her compositions were graceful, her subject matter was often violent; she illustrated such subjects as the story from the Apocrypha of the Jewish heroine Judith beheading Holofernes, an invading general. She worked in Rome and Naples and spent three years with her father in London (1638–41). The first woman artist to attain an international reputation, she is admired today as the earliest to show a feminist consciousness in her work.

Learn more about Gentileschi, Artemisia with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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