Frost, Robert

Frost, Robert

Frost, Robert, 1874-1963, American poet, b. San Francisco. Perhaps the most popular and beloved of 20th-century American poets, Frost wrote of the character, people, and landscape of New England. He was taken to Lawrence, Mass., his family's home for generations, at the age of 10. After studying briefly at Dartmouth, he worked as a bobbin boy in a cotton mill, as a cobbler, a schoolteacher, and a journalist; he later entered Harvard but left after two years to try farming. In 1912 he went to England, where he received his first acclaim as a poet. After the publication of A Boy's Will (1913) and North of Boston (1914), he returned to the United States, settling on a farm near Franconia, N.H. Frost taught and lectured at several universities, including Amherst, Harvard, and the Univ. of Michigan. In later life he was accorded many honors; he made several goodwill trips for the U.S. State Dept., and in 1961 he recited his poem "The Gift Outright" at the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy.

Among Frost's volumes of poetry are New Hampshire (1923), West-running Brook (1928), Collected Poems (1930), A Further Range (1936), A Witness Tree (1942), Steeple Bush (1947), and In the Clearing (1962). A Masque of Reason (1945) and A Masque of Mercy (1947) were blank verse plays. Although his work is rooted in the New England landscape, Frost was no mere regional poet. The careful local observations and homely details of his poems often have deep symbolic, even metaphysical, significance. His poems are concerned with human tragedies and fears, his reaction to the complexities of life, and his ultimate acceptance of his burdens. Frost was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1924, 1931, 1937, and 1943. Frost's critical reputation has recently rebounded after a period when his poetry was often criticized for being old-fashioned.

See his complete poems (1967); his Collected Poems, Prose and Plays (1995), ed. by R. Poirier and M. Richardson; his letters (1972), ed. by A. Grade; biographies by M. L. Mertens (1965), L. R. Thompson (2 vol., 1966-70, vol. III, with R. H. Winnick, 1976), W. H. Pritchard (1985), S. Burnshaw (1986), J. Meyers (1996), and J. Parini (1999); studies by R. A. Brower (1963), F. Lentricchia (1975), and R. Poirier (1977).

Robert Frost, 1954.

(born March 26, 1874, San Francisco, Calif., U.S.—died Jan. 29, 1963, Boston, Mass.) U.S. poet. Frost's family moved to New England early in his life. After stints at Dartmouth College and Harvard University and a difficult period as a teacher and farmer, he moved to England and published his first collections, A Boy's Will (1913) and North of Boston (1914). At the outbreak of war he returned to New England. He closely observed rural life and in his poetry endowed it with universal, even metaphysical, meaning, using colloquial language, familiar rhythms, and common symbols to express both its pastoral ideals and its dark complexities. His collections include New Hampshire (1923, Pulitzer Prize), Collected Poems (1930, Pulitzer Prize), A Further Range (1936, Pulitzer Prize), and A Witness Tree (1942, Pulitzer Prize). He was unique among American poets of the 20th century in simultaneously achieving wide popularity and deep critical admiration. Many of his poems, including “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” “Birches,” “The Death of the Hired Man,” “Dust of Snow,” “Fire and Ice,” and “Home Burial,” are widely anthologized.

Learn more about Frost, Robert (Lee) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

The name Robert is derived from Germanic roots hrod and beraht or berht meaning "fame" and "bright". After becoming widely used in Continental Europe it entered England, where an Anglo-Saxon cognate of the name also already existed with the Normans.

Variations

There are several variations, some of which are used as nicknames for people named Robert, and others which are derived from the name Robert. Of the following, those which are marked "*" also have other derivations.

Bert
Bret
Berto
Bertus
Dicky
Bertros
Bo
Bob
Dick
Rab (Scots)
Robby
Robere (Old French)
Roberts (Robertson)
Rob
Robb
Robercik* (Polish)
Rodbert
Rothbert
Róbert (Icelandic)
Roberto (Latin)
Roberta (Feminine)
Robertino (Italian, "Little Robert")
Beto (Latin)
Robertus
Robbert (Dutch)
Robbi (Icelandic)
Robbie
Röbi (Swiss German)
Robin
Röpke (Low German)
Rabbie
Robban (Swedish)
Roban
Robert
Robetus
Roibeárd (Irish)
Roeper
Roper (Breton/French)
Roope (Finnish)
Roupen (Armenian)
Ruben*
Rubens*
Raban
Rabanus
Rambert*
Ratbert*
Rupert
Ruprecht (Old High German)
Ruppert
Rvpertvs (Latin: "Rupertus")
Rubert
Rochbert
Robrecht (German)
Rodebert
Rodebrecht (Old German)
Rudbert
Rudebet
Roteberht (Germanic)
Rotebert (Germanic)
Rodebert
Feminine forms:
Roberta
Dickie
Robertine
Robertina
Ruprette/a (archaic French)

In Italy during the Second World War, the form of the name, Roberto, briefly acquired a new meaning derived from, and referring to the Rome-Berlin-Tokyo Axis.

Given names

Historical

Saints

Politics and Legal

Entertainment & the arts

Sports

Other

Surnamed

see also Roberts (surname)

Institutions

See also

References

Search another word or see frost, roberton Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;