Definitions

Flavivirus

Flavivirus

Flavivirus is a genus of the family Flaviviridae. This genus includes the West Nile virus, dengue virus, Tick-borne Encephalitis Virus, Yellow Fever Virus, and several other viruses which may cause encephalitis.

Flaviviruses are named from Yellow Fever virus, a type virus for the Flaviviridae family; flavus means yellow in Latin. (Yellow fever in turn was named because of its propensity to cause yellow jaundice in victims.) .

Flaviviruses share a common size (40-65 nm), symmetry (enveloped, icosahedral nucleocapsid), nucleic acid (positive-sense, single stranded RNA approximately 10,000-11,000 bases), and appearance in the electron microscope.

These viruses are transmitted by the bite from an infected arthropod (mosquito or tick) Human infections with these viruses are typically incidental, as humans are unable to replicate the virus to high enough titres to reinfect arthropods and thus continue the virus life cycle. The exceptions to this are Yellow fever virus and Dengue viruses which are well adapted to human and are not dependent upon any other hosts.

Other virus transmission routes include, handling infected animal carcases, blood transfusion, child birth and through consumption unpasturised milk products.

Animals are able to be infected with flavivirues, although the ability for these animals to directly transmit the virus is unlikely.

Replication

Flaviviruses have a (+) sense RNA genome and replicate in the cytoplasm of the host cells. The genome mimics the cellular mRNA molecule in all aspects except for the absence of the poly-adenylated (poly-A) tail. This feature allows the virus to exploit cellular apparatus to synthesise both structural and non-structural proteins, during replication. The cellular ribosome is crucial to the replication of the flavivirus, as it translates the RNA, in a similar fashion to cellular mRNA, resulting in the synthesis of a single polyprotein.

Once translated, the polyprotein is cleaved by a combination of viral and host proteases to release mature polypeptide products. Nevertheless, cellular post-translational modification is dependent on the presence of a poly-A tail; therefore this process is not host-dependent. Instead, the polyprotein contains an autocatalytic feature which automatically releases the first peptide, a virus specific enzyme. This enzyme is then able to cleave the remaining polyprotein into the individual products. One of the products cleaved is a polymerase, responsible for the synthesis of a (-) sense RNA molecule. Consequently this molecule acts as the template for the synthesis of the genomic progeny RNA.

New viral particles are subsequently assembled. This occurs during the budding process which is also responsible for the accumulation of the envelope and cell lysis.

Species

References

External links

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