Definitions

fall flat on face

Professional wrestling throws

Professional wrestling throws are the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him or her down, which makes up most of the action of professional wrestling. Some of these moves are illegal in some forms of traditional amateur wrestling because they can cause serious injury, especially in a competitive environment. They are sometimes also called "power moves", as they are meant to emphasize a wrestler's strength.

There is a wide variety of slams and throws in pro wrestling. Many moves are known by several different names. Professional wrestlers frequently give their "finisher" (signature moves that usually result in a win) new names that reflect their gimmick.

Moves are listed under general categories whenever possible.

Airplane spin

A wrestler lifts the opponent onto their shoulders and spins him around and around until they get dizzy and crash to the ground.

Armbreaker

An armbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams the opponent's arm against a part of the wrestler's body, usually a knee or shoulder. where a wrestler concentrates on the arm and drops a part of their body on to the arm.

Armbar takedown

This variation of the armbreaker involves the attacking wrestler grabbing the opponent's left or right arm, holding it across their chest and then falling backwards, dropping the opponent face first as well as damaging the opponent's arm and shoulder. This move is also known as a single arm DDT.

Arm drag

A move in which the wrestler uses his or her opponent's momentum to the opponent's disadvantage. The wrestler hooks the opponent's arm and flips him or her over onto the mat. The wrestler may roll on to his or her side to give the move extra momentum. Often called a hiptoss

Japanese arm drag

This move is performed when an opponent runs towards the wrestler facing him or her. When the opponent is in range, the wrestler hooks the opponent's near arm with both hands and falls backwards forcing the wrestler's own momentum to cause him or her to flip forwards over the head of the wrestler and onto his or her back.

Over the shoulder arm drag

The wrestler grabs his or her opponent's arm, then turns to face the other direction and pulls the opponent over his or her shoulder. It is essentially the same as the ippon seoinage found in Judo.

Springboard arm drag

An arm drag performed where the attacking wrestler grabs an opponent's arm, runs up the corner ring ropes and springboards, usually off the top rope, over the opponent. This drags the opponent by his or her arm to flip over onto the mat or on to the ropes.

Arm wringer

An Arm Wringer or Spinning Wristlock is a move in which the wrestler grabs the opponent's arm by the wrist/arm and twists it over the wrestler's head to spin it around with enough force to take the opponent to the mat. The maneuver is a popular rest hold in American wrestling. Quite frequently the move is broken with an Irish Whip, reversed into a hammerlock, or countered with a reverse elbow or eye rake/gouge.

Atomic drop

A move in which the wrestler goes behind an opponent puts his head under the opponent's shoulder and lifts his opponent up and then drops him or her tailbone-first on the wrestler's knee or groin

Inverted atomic drop

A move in which the wrestler puts his or her head under the opponent's shoulder and lifts the opponent up and then drops him or her "lower abdomen region" or groin first on the wrestler's knee. It is called a Manhattan Drop in Japan, as named by Masahiro Chono. Even though this move is an indirect low blow, it is considered a legal move. Theoretically, it is the opponent's groin that has impacted with the wrestler's knee, not the other way around. Shawn Michaels is a well-known user of the move, as it usually proceeds his signature elbow drop.

Backbreaker

A backbreaker is any move in which the wrestler lifts his/her opponent up and jumps or drops his/her opponent so that the opponent's back impacts or is bent backwards against a part of the wrestler's body.

Back body drop

A back body drop or backdrop, is a move in which a wrestler bends forward or crouches in front of his/her opponent, grabs hold of his/her opponent, and stands up, lifting the opponent up and over and dropping him/her behind the back. It is applied frequently against a charging opponent.

In Japan, a backdrop is the term for what is called a belly-to-back suplex in America.

Mountain Bomb

The opponent runs towards the wrestler. The wrestler ducks, hooks one of the opponent's legs with one of his arms, stands up and falls backwards, flipping the opponent and driving him back first down to the mat, with the wrestler landing on top of the opponent. Innovated and named by Hiroyoshi Tenzan.

Body slam

A body slam is any move in which a wrestler picks up his or her opponent and throws him or her down to the ground. When used by itself, the term body slam generally refers to a basic scoop slam.

Alabama slam

Also known as a double leg slam, a flapjack spinebuster or a water-wheel slam, this high-angle spinebuster variation involves a wrestler placing their head between an opponent's knees or under the opponent's arm, then standing up, holding onto their opponent's legs, so that the opponent is facing the wrestler's back. The wrestler then simply brings both hands down, throwing the opponent back-first to the mat. They may also hold the opponent in place while spinning in several circles before throwing the opponent down. The move's name was innovated by Bob "Hardcore" Holly after his home state of Alabama.

Biel throw

The wrestler stands to the side of their opponent, grabs them, and throws them forward, causing them to flip over onto their back. It is considered a very basic technique, so basic that a forward rolling fall is commonly called a biel bump, and is mainly used by very large wrestlers to emphasize power and strength over finesse.

Chokeslam

A chokeslam is any body slam in which the wrestler grasps their opponent's neck, lifts them up, and slams them to the mat, causing them to land on their back. Kane, Big Show and The Undertaker are most notable in using this move as finishers or as signature moves, among others.

Cobra clutch slam

In this slam a wrestler places the opponent in a cobra clutch and then lift the opponent into the air by their neck before jumping backwards, falling face down or into a sitting position, driving the opponent back first down to the mat.

Fireman's carry

Fireman's carry slam

The wrestler first drapes an opponent over their shoulders in a fireman's carry position. The wrestler then takes hold of the thigh and arm of the opponent, which are hung over the front side of the wrestler, and leans forward, pulling the opponent over their head and shoulders, slamming them down on their back in front of the wrestler.

A Rolling fireman's carry slam is a variation that sees the wrestler keep hold of the opponent and run forward before slamming the opponent to the ground, using the momentum to roll over the opponent. Mr. Kennedy has been known to perform a jumping variation from the second rope (and on occasion, the top rope or a ladder), and calls it the Green Bay Plunge.

Fireman's carry takeover

The wrestler kneels down on one knee and simultaneously grabs hold of one the opponent's thighs with one arm and one of the opponent's arms with his other arm. He then pulls the opponent on his shoulders and then rises up slightly, using the motion to push the opponent off his shoulders, flipping him to the mat onto his back. This is usually used as a transition move. It is also known as "kata-guruma", or "standing shoulder wheel" in Judo.

Death Valley driver

Often abbreviated to D.V.B. and known as a Death Valley Bomb in Japan. This is a move in which a brainbuster-type slam is performed from a fireman's carry. The wrestler falls in the direction that the opponent's head is facing, driving the opponent's head into the mat. This move was innovated by Etsuko Mita.

Louie Spicolli used the move as a finisher during his tenure in Extreme Championship Wrestling. Upon his death the move was unofficially renamed the Spicolli Driver by announcer Joey Styles, who would call the move by this name when any wrestler performed it in ECW, usually by Tommy Dreamer.

Sean O'Haire uses a variation in which he throws out his opponent on the opposite side. He calls this the Widow Maker or the Prophecy. Toby Klein does a version he calls the Insanity Driver, where he gets his opponent in position then he spins before slamming them (quite often onto a weapon of some sort).

Beth Phoenix uses a variation in which she and the opponent were on the second rope. Then she lifts the opponent in the Fireman's carry position. She and the opponent would then descend to the mat, impacting the opponent's head.

Fireman's carry gutbuster

This is the most common version of the elevated gutbuster and sees the attacking wrestler first lift the opponent up across their shoulders; a position known as a "fireman's carry", before then dropping down to one knee while simultaneously elevating the opponent over their head forcing them to drop down and impact their exposed knee.

A slight variation of this, innovated by Roderick Strong, uses a modified double knee gutbuster and sees the attacking wrestler drop down to their back while bringing both knees up for the opponent to land on. This variation is also used as a finisher by Jamie Noble.

Fireman's carry powerbomb

The wrestler lifts the opponent on to his shoulders, into the Fireman's carry position. The wrestler grabs hold of the opponent's near leg with one hand, and his head with the other. He then pushes the opponent's upper body up and simultaneously spins them, causing them to end up in front of the wrestler face up. The wrestler then either sits down or stays standing. He may also wrap his hands around the opponent's upper legs.

Mammoth Sasaki uses a Airplane spin sitout variation of this move.

Fallaway slam

Also known as a Table Top Suplex or the Last Call. The wrestler, while standing in front of an opponent would reach between their opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around their back from the same side with their other arm. The wrestler lifts their opponent up so they are horizontal across the wrestler's body then falls backward throwing the opponent over their head down to the mat back-first. This slam can be either bridged into a pin, or the wrestler can float over into another fallaway slam. It can also be performed from the second turnbuckle, usually called a Super Fallaway Slam or Super Last Call. This move was popularized by the professional wrestlers Scott Hall and John "Bradshaw" Layfield

Full nelson slam

In this move the aggressor places their opponent in a full nelson hold and uses it to lift them off the ground. Once in the air, the aggressor removes one of their arms (so their opponent is now in a half nelson) and slams them down to the mat. Another similar variation known as Double chickenwing slam sees the wrestler apply double chickenwing instead of a full nelson before slamming the opponent.

Gorilla press drop

The wrestler lifts their opponent up over their head with arms fully extended then drops the opponent down face-first in front or back. It is a popular technique for very large wrestlers because it emphasizes their height and power. Made famous by the Ultimate Warrior, this move is also called the Military Press Slam.

Gorilla press slam

This slam sees a wrestler first lift their opponent up over their head with arms fully extended (as in the military press used in weight lifting), before lowering the arm under the head of the opponent so that the opponent falls to that side, while flipping over and landing on his/her back. The attacking wrestler may repeatedly press the opponent overhead to show his strength, prior to dropping them.

In a variation of the move, the wrestler falls to a seated position, slamming the opponent down between their legs, in a fashion similar to that of the Michinoku Driver II. This is referred to as a Gorilla Press Driver. This also works for bigger wrestlers

Half nelson slam

The wrestler stands behind, slightly to one side of and facing the opponent. The wrestler reaches under one of the opponent's arms with their corresponding arm and places the palm of their hand on the neck of the opponent, thereby forcing the arm of the opponent up into the air to complete the half nelson. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up, turns, and falls forward, slamming the opponent into the mat

Hammerlock slam

A variation of the standard scoop slam, used prominently by the Anderson family. While facing the opponent, the wrestler bends, for example, the opponent's left arm behind the opponent's back into a hammerlock position. The wrestler now, with the left arm, reaches over the opponent's right shoulder and down the back, grabbing the wrist of the opponent's hammerlocked left arm. While firmly holding the opponent's hammerlocked wrist in place, the wrestler uses the right arm to reach down between the opponent's legs and scoops up the opponent. The wrestler then turns the opponent upside down, and slams the opponent's back down to the mat, so that the opponent lands on the hammerlocked arm behind the back.

Olympic slam

The wrestler stands behind the opponent and grabs hold of one of the opponent's wrists, tucks his head under that arm's armpit, and wraps his free arm around the near leg of the opponent. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up on his shoulders sideways, and at the same time spins 90° and falls down on to his back, slamming the opponent down to the mat back first. The move can also be initiated from the front of an opponent. Following a knee to the stomach, the performer places his head under the opponent's armpit, and performs the same motions for that of initiating it from the rear of an opponent, once more spinning backwards 90° while falling to the mat. The move was originally named and innovated by Kurt Angle.

Hirooki Goto uses a wrist-clutch variation called Goto Heaven. In this variation, instead of just wrapping his arm around the opponent’s leg, he grabs hold of the opponent's free arm, pulls it down from the front side between the opponent's legs, grabs hold of the wrist of that arm between the opponent's legs, and then performs the slam. Justice Pain uses an inverted arm-hook variation called the Pain Thriller.

Pumphandle drop

Also known as a Tilt slam, the wrestler stands behind their opponent and bends them forward. One of the opponent's arms is pulled back between their legs and held, while the other arm is hooked. The wrestler then lifts their opponent up until they are parallel with the wrestler's chest, then throws themselves forward, driving the back of the opponent into the ground with the weight of the wrestler atop them. Road Dogg Jesse James uses this as his finisher.

Pumphandle slam

The wrestler stands behind their opponent and bends them forward. One of the opponent's arms is pulled back between their legs and held, while the other arm is hooked (pumphandle). The attacking wrestler uses the hold to lift the opponent up over their shoulder, while over the shoulder the attacking wrestler would fall forward to slam the opponent against the mat back-first, normally the type of powerslam delivered is a front powerslam. The move can also see other variations of a powerslam used, particularly into a sidewalk slam position.

Pumphandle Michinoku driver II

The wrestler lifts the opponent as with a pumphandle slam, but falls to a sitting position and drops the opponent between their legs as with a Michinoku Driver II.

Pumphandle fallaway slam

Also known as the Tilt Suplex. The wrestler hooks up the opponent as a pumphandle slam, then the wrestler goes through the body movements for the fallaway slam, executing the release of the opponent as they enter the apex of the throw, instead of at or just past the apex of the throw like when one executes the fallaway slam. Usually the opponent then adds effort to gain extra rotations in the air for effect or to ensure that they do not take the bump on their side.

Samoan drop

Technically known as a Fireman's carry drop; the wrestler drapes an opponent over their shoulders in a fireman's carry position then falls backwards, driving the opponent down to the mat on their back. The move has been a signature move for Samoan wrestlers throughout the years. A Samoan drop is usually a counter to drop the opponents momentum.

Scoop slam

Facing their opponent, the wrestler reaches between their opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around their back from the same side with their other arm. The wrestler lifts their opponent up and turns them upside down so that they are held up by the wrestler's arm cradling their back. The wrestler then throws the opponent to the ground so that they land on their back. The opponent will often assist the slammer by placing their arm on the slammers thigh.

Side slam

The wrestler stands face to face with the opponent, slightly to their side. The wrestler tucks his head under the opponent's near arm, reaches across the opponent's chest and around their neck with his near arm, and places his other arm against their back. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up and throws them forward while still standing to slam them down to the mat back first. This more common Powerslam Version sees the wrestler falls down to the mat with the opponent.

Spinebuster

The wrestler starts by facing their opponent. They then grab the opponent around the waist and lift them up, turning 180°, and toss them forward onto their back or slam them down while landing on top of them. It is usually performed against a charging opponent, using the opponent's own momentum to make the throw more powerful. It is called a rolling spinebuster or spinning spinebuster in Japan. This version is generally associated with Tiddler and his name is often evoked whenever a wrestler performs it (Double-A Spinebuster, Anderson Spinebuster, etc.) Another version, more commonly used by larger wrestlers sees the wrestler elevate the opponent up and drop down with them to the mat without spinning, slamming their opponent's back into the mat.

Brainbuster

A brainbuster, also known as an Avalanche Suplex, is a move in which a wrestler puts his/her opponent in a front facelock, hooks his/her tights, and lifts him/her up as if he/she was performing a vertical suplex. The wrestler then jumps up and falls onto his/her back so that the opponent lands on his/her head while remaining vertical.

Bulldog

A bulldog, originally known as bulldogging or a bulldogging headlock, is any move in which the wrestler grabs an opponent's head and jumps forward, so that the wrestler lands, often in a sitting position, and drives the opponent's face into the mat. This move plus some other variations are sometimes referred to as a facebuster. It can also be used as a reversal to a powerbomb.

Cutter

This variant is done from the front, using a three-quarters facelock, and has many derivative variants.

Cobra clutch bulldog

The wrestler applies a Cobra Clutch and then leaps forward, falling into a sitting position and driving the face of the opponent into the ground.

Half nelson bulldog

The wrestler hooks a half nelson hold on his opponent with one arm and his opponents waist with the other. He then leaps forward into a sitting position, driving the face of the opponent into the ground. This move is also incorrectly referred to as a faceplant, which is a different move altogether.

One-handed bulldog

Also known as the "Face Crusher", the one-handed bulldog is in fact more of a facebuster than an actual bulldog and generally sees a wrestler run up from behind their opponent, grab the opponent's head with one hand and leap forward to drive this opponent's face into the mat.

A two-handed variation of this sees the attacking wrestler charge at the opponent and push, with both hands, down on the back of the opponent's head to force them face-first into the mat below.

Reverse bulldog

The attacking wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the opponent, facing in the opposite direction, from there he/she leaps in the air and drops to a seated position driving the opponent neck and back first to the mat. In another variation, the attacker runs to the opponent and executes the move. This is usually referred to a lariat takedown.

Spinning bulldog

The wrestler places the opponent in a modified fireman's carry in which the opponent is held diagonally across the wrestlers back with their legs across one shoulder and head under the opposite shoulder (usually held in place with a facelock). The wrestler then spins simultaneously throwing the opponent's legs off the wrestler's shoulders and dropping to the ground, driving the opponent's head into the mat in a bulldog position.

Catapult

A Catapult or Slingshot Catapult is a throw that typically starts with the opponent on his/her back, and the wrestler standing and facing him. The wrestler hooks each of the opponent's legs in one of his/her arms then falls backwards to slingshot the opponent into a turnbuckle, ladder, rope, etc. This can also be held for a backbreaker.

DDT

Similar to a bulldog, a DDT is any move in which the wrestler falls down or backwards to drive the opponent's head into the mat. The classic DDT is performed by putting the opponent in a front facelock and falling backwards so that the opponent is forced to dive forward onto his/her head.

Death Valley driver

Often abbreviated to D.V.D. and known as a Death Valley Bomb in Japan. This is a move in which a brainbuster-type slam is performed from a fireman's carry. The wrestler falls in the direction that the opponent's head is facing, driving the opponent's head into the mat. This move was innovated by Etsuko Mita.

Louie Spicolli used the move as a finisher during his tenure in Extreme Championship Wrestling. Upon his death the move was unofficially renamed the Spicolli Driver by announcer Joey Styles, who would call the move by this name when any wrestler performed it in ECW, usually by Tommy Dreamer.

Sean O'Haire uses a variation in which he throws out his opponent on the opposite side. He calls this the Widow Maker or the Prophecy. Toby Klein does a version he calls the Insanity Driver, where he gets his opponent in position then he spins before slamming them (quite often onto a weapon of some sort).

Beth Phoenix uses a variation in which she and the opponent were on the second rope. Then she lifts the opponent in the Fireman's carry position. She and the opponent would then descend to the mat, impacting the opponent's head.

Inverted Death Valley driver

Invented by Kyoko Inoue and called the Victoria Driver. Also known as a Burning Hammer or inverted D.V.D. The move is executed from a Argentine backbreaker rack (face up, with the neck and one leg cradled) position. The wrestler falls sideways, driving the opponent's head to the mat. This is considered an extremely dangerous move as the opponent's body cannot roll with the natural momentum of the move to absorb the impact. It was popularized by Kenta Kobashi as the Burning Hammer.

A cut-throat variation of this driver was innovated by Mark Briscoe, which he named the Cut-Throat Driver, where instead of holding the body of the opponent he would hold the far arm of the opponent across the opponents own throat, and maintain it by holding the opponents wrist, before performing the inverted Death Valley driver.

Side Death Valley driver

A variation between the regular Death Valley driver and the inverted one. The opponent lays on the shoulders of the wrestler on his side, facing either the opposite or the same direction as the wrestler, with the wrestler holding the opponent by the lower leg, and either the head or lower arm. The wrestler then falls sideways, driving the opponent down to the mat shoulder and neck first.

Driver

A Driver is a variation of many moves; it involves an opponent being driven down between the legs of a wrestler (who is dropping to a seated position) on the back of his/her neck/shoulder area.

Blue Thunder driver

Electric chair driver

In this variation of a driver the wrestler lifts the opponent on his/her shoulders in an electric chair sitting position and then takes hold of the opponent and pulls him/her over his/her shoulder and down to the mat while falling to a sit out position so that the opponent lands on his/her upper back and neck between the legs of the wrestler, facing towards him/her, usually resulting in a pin. Nick Mondo used an iconoclasm instead of the usual driver. He calls this variation the Assault Driver.

Fisherman driver

The wrestler places the opponent in a front facelock and hooks one of the opponent's legs with his free arm. The wrestler then lifts the opponent upside down or onto his shoulders, and then sits down, driving the opponent between his legs, head and shoulder first.

A wrist-clutch variation of this driver exists which sees the wrestler lift the opponent onto his/her shoulders, and while the opponent is on his/her shoulders, he/she uses the hand hooking the opponent's leg to reach upwards and clutch the wrist of the arm opposite the hooked leg. While maintaining the wrist-clutch they then perform the driver. There is a further variation that does not include the shoulder lift that sees the wrestler hook the leg and wrist while the opponent is standing in front of them, lift the opponent upside down and then fall to the sitout position.

Half nelson driver

The wrestler stands behind the opponent and applies a half nelson hold on his opponent, placing one of his hands against the opponent's neck after hooking the opponent's arm with it. He the scoops the opponent's near leg with his other arm and lifts the opponent up, flips the opponent upside down, and then either kneels or sits down, driving the opponent down to the mat on their neck.

Michinoku driver II

Also known as a 'sitout scoop slam piledriver', but is named after its inventor TAKA Michinoku. While facing his/her opponent, the wrestler reaches between his/her opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around his/her back from the other side with his/her other arm. The wrestler lifts his/her opponent up and turns him/her upside down so that he/she is held up by the wrestler's arm cradling his/her back. The wrestler then throws the opponent to the ground as he/she falls to a sitting position so that the opponent lands on his/her upper back. This is often simply called a Michinoku Driver because TAKA Michinoku rarely uses the original Michinoku Driver, a double underhook brainbuster.

Michinoku driver II-B

TAKA Michinoku also invented a variation of the Michinoku Driver II in which the wrestler stands behind the opponent, applies an inverted facelock, lifts them upside down, and then drops down to a sitting position, driving the opponent down to the mat between the wrestler's legs upper back first.

Samoan driver

Also known as Fireman's carry michinoku Driver II or sitout death valley driver. The attacking wrestler drapes an opponent over their shoulders in a fireman's carry position and then takes hold of the opponent and pulls them over their shoulder and down to the mat while falling to a sitting position so that the opponent lands on their upper back and neck between the legs of the wrestler, facing towards them.

Tiger driver

Invented by Mitsuharu Misawa. The wrestler faces a bent over opponent and double underhooks the opponent's arms. The wrestler then lifts them up, flips the opponent and drops the opponent on their back while falling to sitting position, often pinning the opponent in the process. This is also known as a 'sitout double underhook powerbomb'.

There is some dispute over the correct name because the move resembles a Powerbomb more than a driver. Thus, the move is also sometimes referred to as a Tiger Bomb. However, Tiger Driver is the original and more commonly accepted name. Some consider a double underhook powerbomb where the wrestler does not drop into a sitout position to be a Tiger Bomb, while the sitout variant is considered the Tiger Driver.

Jaguar Yokota innovated a variation in which the opponent is dropped on their neck and shoulders, rather than their back, and the wrestler drops to their knees. This variation is usually called the Tiger Driver '91, after the year in which Mitsuharu Misawa (who popularized the move) first performed it.

Wheelbarrow driver

Similar to a wheelbarrow facebuster but instead of dropping their opponent face first, they drop their opponent so that the opponent lands on their upper back and neck between the legs of the wrestler, facing towards them usually resulting in a pin.

A half nelson variation is used by Dragon Gate wrestler Naruki Doi, who calls it Muscular Bomb.

Electric chair drop

The wrestler lifts the opponent on his/her shoulders in an electric chair sitting position and then falls backwards driving the opponent back-first into the mat.

Manami Toyota innovated a cross-armed version which is bridged into a pin, calling it the "Japanese Ocean Cyclone Suplex". Kaz uses a wrist-lock variation of this move, also bridged into a pin, called Back to the Future.

Hajah Fatimah uses a version where she drops her opponent's head onto a turnbuckle as a finisher.

Electric chair bomb

Facebreaker

A facebreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's face against a part of the wrestler's body, usually the knee.

Facebreaker DDT

The wrestler applies a front facelock and then falls backwards, much like a normal DDT, but instead of the opponent's head impacting the mat, the wrestler falls to a kneeling or sitting position driving the face of the opponent onto his/her knee.

Facebreaker knee smash

The knee smash, also called a Coconuts crush, is a standard facebreaker which involves the wrestler facing an opponent and grabbing him or her by the head or hair and pulling the opponent's face down, dropping it on to the wrestler's knee. Often used by a wrestler to stun an opponent and set him or her up for another move.

Many other facebreakers use the knee to inflict the damage; one variation sees the wrestler apply a standing side headlock, and simultaneously pull the opponent forward and smash the wrestler's knee to the opponent's head. There is also a double knee variation.

Double knee facebreaker

This facebreaker involves an attacking wrestler, who is standing face-to-face with an opponent, hooking both hands around the opponent's head and then leaping to bring both knees up to the face of the opponent. The wrestler then falls backwards to the mat, thus forcing the opponent to fall forwards and impact the exposed knees. CIMA and his Typhoon stablemates, most notably Susumu Yokosuka, use a double-team variation from a wheelbarrow position called the Superdrol. A single knee variation is also possible. Petey Williams uses a version where he slingshots off the ring apron into the ring and drives both knees into his opponents chest. Naomichi Marufuji has recently started using the maneuver, and after seeing him perform it at an ROH show, Chris Jericho adopted a running variation called the Codebreaker as his new finisher, usually preceded by his signature stance.

Hangman's facebreaker

Also described as an over the shoulder facebreaker, this facebreaker is performed when an attacking wrestler, who is standing in a back-to-back position with an opponent, reaches back to pull the opponent's head over his/her shoulder before (while keeping a hold of the opponent's head) spinning round to twist the opponent's head over as they drop down to one knee forcing the opponent face-first into the wrestlers exposed knee in one quick fluid motion.

Facebuster

A facebuster, also known as a faceplant, is any move in which the wrestler forces his/her opponent's face down to the mat which does not involve a headlock or facelock. If these are used then the move is either a DDT or bulldog variation. Also, inverted Mat Slams are commonly referred to as facebusters. A standard Facebuster also known as a Jumping facebuster involves the wrestler grabbing hold of the opponent by his/her head or hair and jumping down, forcing the opponent's face into the mat.

Flapjack

A flapjack, also known as a Pancake slam, is any move that throws the opponent so that he/she is pushed upward and therefore having him/her fall on his/her front. In a basic flapjack, a wrestler pushes his opponent upward by reaching under his legs and lifting him into the air. While retaining the hold on the opponent's leg, the wrestler would fall backwards, dropping the opponent front-first into the canvas. It is commonly used by a wrestler when an opponent is charging towards him.

The move is similar to a back drop, but the wrestler pushes upwards so that the opponent falls onto his/her face instead of falling back-first.

A Hotshot is referred to when a flapjack is performed so that the opponent falls across the ring ropes. The fireman's carry flapjack sees the wrestler lift the opponent on to a fireman's carry, and then throw the upper body of the opponent away from the wrestler while the wrestler falls backwards, driving the opponent down to the mat chest first.

Alley Oop

Also known as a reverse powerbomb. The wrestler lifts the opponent so that they are seated on the wrestler’s shoulders, facing away from him, as in a powerbomb. The wrestler then falls backwards while throwing the opponent the same way, dropping them down to the mat on their chest. Tori innovated a variation of this maneuver where she wouldn't keep the opponent on her shoulders, but instead, she would do the maneuver very fast so it whipped the opponent. This was referred to as the Tori-Plex, a name popularized by the SmackDown video game series.This variation innovated by Tori is currently performed by Jeff Hardy, since 2008.

Another variation of this is best called a Package powerbomb throw, or Steenalizer (The latter name coming from the most known user of this variation Kevin Steen). This version sees the wrestler pick the opponent up onto their shoulders in powerbomb position and dropping backwards while throwing the opponents so that the opponent flips forward and lands on their neck and upper back.

Giant swing

A Giant swing starts with an opponent lying on the mat, face up, and the wrestler at the opponent's feet. The wrestler takes the opponent's legs up under his/her arms, similar to the setup for a catapult, but instead pivots, spinning around to lift the opponent off the mat. The attacking may release the opponent to send him/her flying, or simply slow until the back of the opponent returns to the ground.

Guillotine drop

Innovated by Nikki Roxx. This move sees the attacking wrestler lift the opponent in a standing guillotine choke and to drop the opponent lower spine first to the mat. This eventually causes an effect to the whole spine and neck. Nikki Roxx first applies a hammerlock and then executes the move. She dubbed this the Barbie Crusher or Voodoo Drop for her Roxxi Laveaux gimmick. Chris Hero uses a variation of the move where he applies a cravate instead of a guillotine choke. He calls the move Cravate Countdown.

Gutbuster

A Gutbuster is any move in which the wrestler lifts his/her opponent up and jumps or drops him/her so that the opponent's stomach impacts against part of the wrestler's body, usually the knee. A basic gutbuster is often called a stomach breaker and is essentially the same as a backbreaker but with the opponent facing the opposite direction. This similarity with backbreakers is reflected in almost every gutbuster variation, which if inverted would become backbreakers and visa versa.

Double knee gutbuster

This gutbuster involves an attacking wrestler, who is standing face-to-face with an opponent, hooking both hands around the opponent's head and leaping to bring both knees up to the stomach of the opponent; the wrestler will then fall backwards, forcing the opponent to fall forwards and impact the exposed knees.

Jamie Noble began using this as a finisher in 2008.

Elevated gutbuster

This variation of a gutbuster sees an opponent first elevated into a high lifting transition hold before being dropped down for a gutbuster.

Gorilla press gutbuster

This version of the elevated gutbuster first sees the attacking wrestler lift an opponent over his/her head with his/her arms fully extended; a position known as a "Gorilla press", before then dropping down to one knee while simultaneously elevating the opponent over his/her head forcing him/her to drop down and impact the attacking wrestler's exposed knee.

Gutbuster drop

An elevated gutbuster in which an attacking wrestler would lift an opponent up, stomach-first, across one of their shoulders before dropping down to their knees forcing the opponent's stomach to impact on the wrestler's shoulder.

Rib breaker

A rib breaker is a version of a gutbuster that involves the wrestler scooping the opponent up by reaching between the legs of the opponent with one arm and reaching around their back from the same side with his/her other arm. The wrestler then lifts his/her opponent up so they are horizontal across the wrestler’s body. From here the wrestler drops down to one knee, forcing the opponent to drop stomach/rib-first against the wrestler's raised knee.

Headscissors takedown

The move can be performed two ways, with the wrestler facing up or down. With the wrestler's legs scissored around the opponent's head, and if the wrestler is facing up, he performs a backflip, dragging the opponent into a forced somersault that throws the opponent away and on to their back. If the wrestler is facing down, he bends forward instead of performing a backflip. Of the two variations the facing down version is more often referred to as a Headscissors takedown with the facing up version being referred to as a Frankensteiner or Hurricanrana.

A variation where the wrestler forces the opponent to spin before releasing him is referred to as a Satellite (spinning) headscissors. Another variation when the attacking wrestler rotates numerous times around the opponent before performing the head scissors is known as Déjà Vu as named by Dragon Kid.

Frankensteiner

This move is commonly referred to as a huracanrana or hurricanrana, although it is technically slightly different. The move is described as a headscissors takedown that is performed against a running opponent. The wrestler jumps on the shoulders of the charging opponent and performs a backflip, using his momentum to throw the opponent over him and on to their back.

It was named "Frankensteiner" by Scott Steiner, who used it as a finishing move. The move also has a variation where the opponent is sitting on the top rope, that variation is also referred to as frankensteiner. Another variation of the Frankensteiner sees a grounded wrestler first "kip-up" on to a standing opponent's shoulders, this is where a wrestler roll onto the back of his/her shoulders bringing his/her legs up and kicking forward to build momentum to lift themselves off the floor and on to the standing opponent. This is often referred to as a kip-up hurricanrana, though technically it's a frankensteiner.

Reverse frankensteiner

Also known as an Inverted Frankensteiner or Poison Rana, this move is similar to a standard frankensteiner. The wrestler jumps on the shoulders of an opponent and performs a backflip, using the momentum to throw the opponent over. However, in this version a wrestler jumps on the shoulders of an opponent from behind, so that they are facing the same way as the opponent. By leaning backwards the wrestler attempts to perform a backflip and throw the opponent over on their belly. Due to the difficulty in performing a backflip with the extra weight often the ending of this move sees the opponent's head stuck between the legs of the wrestler hitting the mat first; giving it a resemblance to a back-to-back flip piledriver.

This move is dangerous in that the attacking wrestler cannot let go of the head scissors because the opponent has no natural momentum with the move so most of the time the opponent lands on their head between the legs of the wrestler, and if the opponent doesn't aid the backflip enough the wrestler can end up being crushed by the opponent landing on their back.

Hurricanrana

The correct name for this maneuver is the Huracanrana, but it is commonly misspelled in English as Hurricanrana and was invented by Luchador Huracan Ramirez. This is a Frankensteiner headscissors takedown that ends in a rana pinning hold. The rana is any double-leg cradle. Rey Mysterio and Evan Bourne use the same move except Rey Mysterio calls his the West Coast Pop which is a springboard version. The huracanrana is typically done with more velocity than the headscissors takedown, as the opponent needs to land directly underneath the wrestler, instead of being tossed away.

It is often confused with the more impactful non-pinning headscissor variation known as a Frankensteiner, although the difference is similar to seeing a bridged suplex compared to a released one.

Hip toss

The wrestler stands next to the opponent with both facing the same direction, and the wrestler hooks their closest arm underneath and behind the opponent's closest armpit. The wrestler then quickly lifts the opponent up with that arm and throws them forward, which would lead the wrestler to flip the opponent onto their back to end the move.

Mideon used a variation of this move in which the wrestler first puts the opponent into a pumphandle setup and then flips the opponent over on their back.

Iconoclasm

This top rope flipping slam sees a wrestler stand under an opponent, who is situated on the top turnbuckle, turn his/her back to this opponent while taking hold of the opponent's arms from below, often holding underneath the opponent's arm pits. The wrestler would then throw the opponent forward while falling to a seated position, flipping the opponent over in midair, and slamming them down to the mat back first. The Iconoclasm was popularized and named by Dragon Gate wrestler, CIMA. There is also a cross armed variation, dubbed the goriconoclasm by CIMA.

Christopher Daniels uses a variation, which he calls the Fall From Grace, in which Daniels wraps one of the opponent's arms around their own neck and throws them down by the wrapped arm.

Irish whip

Also called a hammer throw. A move in which the wrestler grabs one of his/her opponent's arms and spins, swinging the opponent into an obstacle such as the ring ropes, a turnbuckle, or the stairs leading into the ring.

An Irish whip into the ring ropes is usually used to set the opponent up for another technique as he/she bounces off, such as a back body drop, clothesline or sleeper hold. An Irish whip into the turnbuckles usually sees the opponent remain in the corner, allowing a follow-up attack from the wrestler, such as a corner clothesline, avalanche, Stinger splash, or a running knee; the opponent may remain standing or slump to the ground, usually in a seated position, which will vary the attack. One occasional use of the Irish whip is to try to "hit for the cycle" by whipping one's opponent into each corner in turn. Some professional wrestlers can use this move as an advantage by running up the turnbuckle and using a high flying move such as Jeff Hardy using his Whisper in the Wind.

Jawbreaker

A jawbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's jaw against a part of the wrestler's body, usually his/her knee, head or shoulder.

Sitout jawbreaker

Jeff Hardy does this as he pulls his opponents jaw on top of his head and lands in a sitting position. He does this when his opponent is about to pick him up. A standard jawbreaker is seen when a wrestler (either stands facing or not facing opponent) places his/her head under the jaw of the opponent and holds the opponent in place before falling into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the jaw of the opponent into the top of his/her head. Sometimes it is also used to counter a headlock by the opponent.

Shoulder jawbreaker

Also known as a hangman's jawbreaker, the wrestler stands facing the opponent, places his/her shoulder under the jaw of the opponent and holds the opponent in place before falling into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the jaw of the opponent into his/her shoulder.

Stunner

A Stunner is a sitout three-quarter facelock jawbreaker. It involves an attacking wrestler applying a three-quarter facelock (reaching behind the head of an opponent, thus pulling the opponent's jaw above the wrestler's shoulder) before falling to a seated position and forcing the defender's jaw to drop down on the shoulder of the attacking wrestler. It is a finishing move used by Stone Cold Steve Austin. The original user of the move was Mikey Whipwreck.

Mat slam

A mat slam is any move in which the wrestler forces the back of the opponent's head into the mat which does not involve a headlock or facelock. If these are used then the move is considered a type of DDT (if the wrestler falls backwards) or bulldog. A standard Mat Slam involves the wrestler grabbing hold of the opponent by his/her head or hair and pulling back, forcing the back of the opponent's head into the mat.

Double underhook mat slam

The wrestler faces an opponent, overhooks both arms, and then pivots 180º so that the opponent is facing upwards with his or her head pressed against the upper back--or under an arm--of the wrestler. The wrestler then drops down to his/her back, driving the back of the opponent's head and neck into the mat.

Sitout rear mat slam

The wrestler takes hold of their opponent from behind, holding them by either their hair or the top of their head. The wrestler then jumps backwards and falls to a sitting position, driving the back of the opponent's head into the ground between their legs. Edge calls his version the Edge-O-Matic and X-Pac calls his version the X-O-Matic.

A variation sees the wrestler run up the corner turnbuckles, perform a backflip over a chasing opponent, and at the same time grab hold of the opponents head and perform the slam. In another variation the wrestler could put the opponent in a straight jacket hold before dropping him/her in a sitout position. Talia Madison calls this move the 'Re-TALIA-Tion.

Sleeper slam

This slamming version of a headlock takedown sees a wrestler apply a sleeper hold to the opponent, then falls face first to the ground, pulling the opponent down with them and driving the back and head of the opponent into the ground. Chris Jericho popularized this move and calls it the Flashback. Another version Jericho popularized involves catching the head of a charging opponent, swinging around them to pull them down to the mat. A similar variation is used by Masato Yoshino and Hiroshi Tanahashi, named the Sling Blade, in which he runs towards an opponent, catches their head, swings around them and pulls their head down to the mat with him.

Tilt-a-whirl mat slam

As the name suggests the wrestler would first use a tilt-a-whirl to raise the opponent into a belly-to-belly (piledriver) position, from here the wrestler would fall forward planting the opponent into the mat back-first. This is also called Tilt-a-whirl slam.

The move is sometimes named by fans and independent commentators as an "Inverted Styles Clash" in reference to a belly-to-back version. Though not often used by many wrestlers, this mat slam does happen as a result of other botched (poorly executed) moves. When a wrestler is lifted for a standard tilt-a-whirl slam they can often be positioned wrong a land in this fashion, also when wrestlers are performing tombstone piledriver if the weight isn't properly distributed the attacking wrestler can fall forward instead of straight down; hitting a mat slam rather than the piledriver they are attempting.

Monkey flip

This move, often referred to as a Monkey climb in British wrestling, involves an attacking wrestler, who is standing face-to-face with an opponent, hooking both hands around the opponent's head before then bringing up both legs so that they place their feet on the hips/waist of the opponent; making the head hold and the wrestlers' sense of balance are the only things allowing both wrestler to be in an upright position. At this point, the attacking wrestler would shift their weight so that they fall backwards to the mat while forcing the opponent to fall forwards with them only to have the attacking wrestler push up with their legs forcing the opponent to flip forwards, over the wrestler's head, onto their back. This move is most commonly performed out of a ring corner. This is due to it being easier to climb onto an opponent while in the corner as balance is easily retained, and it allows the maximum length of ring to propel the opponent across.

Muscle Buster

Also known as double leg hook brainbuster,the move is performed when an attacking wrestler hooks both an opponent's legs with his/her arms and tucks their head in next to the opponent's before standing and lifting the opponent up, so that they are upside down with their head resting on the attacking wrestler's shoulder. From this position, the attacking wrestler jumps up and drops down to the mat, driving the opponent shoulder first down to the mat with the opponent's neck impacting both the wrestler's shoulder and the mat.

This can see the wrestler pick up an opponent who is standing but bent forward but it often begins with an opponent who is sitting on an elevated position, usually a top turnbuckle, because it's easier to hook and lift an opponent when they are positioned higher than the wrestler. Samoa Joe is noted for often using an Avalanche Muscle Buster, where he falls to the mat from a raised platform, usually the second rope. The move also has a neckbreaker variation which focuses more of the attack on the opponent's neck.

Neckbreaker

There are two general categories of neckbreaker, which are related only in that they attack the opponent's neck. One category of neckbreaker is the type of move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's neck against a part of the wrestler's body, usually his/her knee, head or shoulder. A neckbreaker slam is another technique in which the wrestler throws his/her opponent to the ground by twisting the opponent's neck. also a back head slam or, when a wrestler drops to the mat while holding an opponent by their neck, without having to twist it.

Piledriver

A Piledriver is any move in which the wrestler grabs their opponent, turns them upside-down, and drops into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the opponent's head into the mat. Other variations focus the attack on the neck, rather than the head.

Powerbomb

A powerbomb is a move in which an opponent is lifted up into the air and then slammed down back-first to the mat. The standard Powerbomb sees the opponent placed in a standing headscissors position (bent forward with their head placed between the wrestler's thighs), lifted up on the wrestler's shoulders, and slammed back-first down to the mat.

Powerslam

A powerslam is any slam in which the wrestler performing the technique falls face-down on top of his/her opponent. The use of the term "powerslam" usually refers to the front powerslam and the scoop powerslam.

Shin breaker

The wrestler faces the opponent from the side, slightly behind. He tucks his head under the opponent's near armpit, and grabs hold of the opponent's near leg, bending it fully. He then lifts the opponent up and slams him downwards, impacting the opponent's bent leg on one of the wrestler's knee. This move is used to weaken the leg for a submission maneuver. Such users include Ric Flair using a shin breaker to set up for his Figure four leglock.

Shoulderbreaker

A shoulderbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's shoulder against any part of the wrestler's body, usually the shin or knee. This move is normally used to weaken the arm for a submission maneuver or to make it more difficult for the opponent to kick out of a possible pinfall attempt. The most common version sees the wrestler turn the opponent upside-down and drop the opponent shoulder-first on the wrestler's knee. Usually the opponent is held over the wrestler's shoulder in either a powerslam position, or less commonly an inverted powerslam position for what is sometimes called the Reverse Shoulderbreaker.

Snake Eyes

This move sees the wrestler place the opponent stomach down on his or her shoulder such that they both are facing the same direction. The wrestler then throws the opponent face-first onto any top turnbuckle or throat-first on any top rope of the ring. The move was made popular by Kevin Nash during his early 90's WCW gimmick of Vinnie Vegas and by the Undertaker in the WWE, usually followed by a Big Boot.

Snapmare

With the wrestler's back to the opponent, he/she applies a three-quarter facelock (also known as a cravate), kneels down, and then pulls the opponent forward, flipping them over his/her shoulder down to the mat, back first. Another variation sees the wrestler hold the opponent by the hair instead of putting them in a three quarters facelock before slamming them to the mat. This is often used as a transition to a submission hold, usually a grounded sleeper.

Snapmare driver

A high impact variation of the snapmare where instead of flipping the opponent over, the wrestler drops down either on their chest or down on their knees and drives the opponent's head down to the mat forehead first, with the three quarters facelock.

Suplex

A suplex is the same as the amateur suplex, a throw which involves arching/bridging either overhead or twisting to the side, so the opponent is slammed to the mat back-first. The term suplex (without qualifiers) can also refer specifically to the vertical suplex.

Spinning crucifix toss

Sergei lifts the opponent above his back with the opponent's arm spread out in a crucifix hold, spins around, pushes the opponent up, and moves out of the way, dropping the opponent down to the mat. TNA wrestler James Storm performs this move, calling it the Eye of the Storm.

Trips and sweeps

Cobra clutch legsweep

The wrestler places his opponent in the Cobra clutch, then stands to one side of the opponent, hooks their nearest foot behind their opponent's nearest leg and throws themselves backwards, forcing their opponent backwards to the ground. The move is most prominently used by Johnny Swinger, who calls it the 'Swing Thing'.

Double leg takedown

A tackle where the intention is to force the opponent down on their back by tackling them at their waist or upper thighs. This usually involves grabbing the opponent with both arms around the opponent's legs while keeping the chest close to the opponent, and using this position to force the opponent to the ground.

Dragon screw legwhip

This is a legwhip where a wrestler grabs an opponent's leg and holds it parallel to the mat while they are facing each other. The attacking wrestler then spins the leg inwards causing the opponent to fall off balance and twist in the air bringing them to the ground in a turning motion. Popularized by Tatsumi Fujinami who gave the move its name.

Mandala hineri

Also referred to as Mandara Twist, this is a variant of the dragon screw where the wrestler spins to the outside, causing leg damage and causing their opponent to go airborne.

Drop toe-hold

The wrestler falls to the ground, placing one foot at the front of the opponent's ankle and the other in the back of the shin. This causes the opponent to fall face first into the ground. It is sometimes used illegally to force an opponent into a chair or other elevated weapon; it is also used occasionally to force an opponent face-first into the turnbuckles, stunning him/her or her momentarily. Technical wrestlers may use it as a quick transitional move into a grounded submission hold. Rey Mysterio usually does that to set up the 619. Also referred to as a Scissor Sweep. Raven uses this move to trip opponents head-first to an upright chair.

Half nelson legsweep

The wrestler stands behind, slightly to one side of and facing the opponent. The wrestler reaches under one of the opponent's arms with his/her corresponding arm and places the palm of his/her hand on the neck of the opponent, thereby forcing the arm of the opponent up into the air (the Half Nelson). The wrestler then uses his/her other arm to pull the opponent's other arm behind the opponent's head, so both opponent's arms are pinned. The wrestler then hooks the opponent's near leg and throws themselves backwards, driving the opponent back-first to the ground.

Russian legsweep

Also known as a Side Russian legsweep. A move in which a wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the opponent, facing in the same direction, and reaches behind the opponent's back to hook the opponent's head with the other hand extending the opponent's nearest arm, then while hooking the opponent's leg the wrestler falls backward, pulling the opponent to the mat back-first.

The Sandman uses a variation in which he holds a kendo stick across his opponent's throat, he calls it the White Russian Legsweep. There is also a facebuster variation of this move, noted to have been used by Jeff Jarrett, who called it the Stroke.

Three-quarter facelock Russian legsweep

The wrestler stands in front of, facing away from and slightly to one side of the opponent. The wrestler then reaches behind themselves and applies a three-quarter facelock to the opponent. The wrestler then hooks the opponent's near leg with their own near leg and sweeps the leg away, simultaneously throwing themselves backwards, thus driving the opponent to the ground (with the weight of the wrestler on top of them) and wrenching the opponent's neck.

Schoolboy

This technique gives its name to the schoolboy bump and is performed when the wrestler drops down to his (schoolboy)/her (schoolgirl) knees behind the opponent and forces his/her bodyweight forward to trip the opponent over the attacking wrestler so that they fall flat on their back. The name schoolboy also refers to a roll-up pin.

STO

STO (Space Tornado Ogawa) is a sweep in which a wrestler wraps one arm across the chest of his/her opponent and sweeps the opponent's leg with his/her own leg to slam the other wrestler back-first. This can also be a lariat-legsweep combination to slam down opponent. Same as the judo sweep O-soto-gari. Naoya Ogawa, a former Olympic judoka, adapted the move into pro wrestling.

Chokehold STO

This variation of the STO involves the attacking wrestler applying a one handed choke before sweeping the opponent's leg. Shelly Martinez is notable for using this move during her tenure in both World Wrestling Entertainment and Total Nonstop Action Wrestling.

Clawhold STO

Also known as an STK (Space Tornado Kensuke) as named by Kensuke Sasaki. This move is an STO where the wrestler would first apply a clawhold with one hand before sweeping his/her opponent's leg.

Reverse STO

This is a move in which a wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the opponent, facing in the opposite direction, and reaches around the opponent's torso with one arm across the opponent's chest with his/her hand holding onto his/her other hand which is behind the opponent's head. The wrestler then falls backward, driving the opponent into the mat face-first. In Japan, the wrestler known as Gedo began using the move while a member of a stable of wrestlers known as the "Complete Players", calling it the Complete Shot. Also used by Carilto which he calls the Cool Shot which is a jumping version of the Reverse STO. Furthermore it is used by Ken Kennedy which he calls the Mic Check.

Set up move

These are transition moves that set up for various throws and slams.

See also

References

External links

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