Definitions

Dowland

Dowland

[dou-luhnd]
Dowland, John, 1563-1626, English composer, unsurpassed in his day as a lutenist. His books of Songs or Ayres (1597-1603) established him as the foremost song composer of his time.

See studies by D. Poulton (1972) and I. Spink (1974).

(born 1562/63, Westminster, London, Eng.—died Jan. 21, 1626, London) English composer and lutenist. Educated at Oxford, he was refused a court position in 1594 and, believing his adoptive Catholicism had been the cause, he left for the continent. There he traveled extensively and took a position at the Danish court. In 1612, when his compositions had made him famous, he was finally appointed lutenist to the English court. He published three collections of songs, including about 90 works for solo lute and some 80 lute songs, including “Come again, sweet love does now endite,” “ Flow my tears,” and “Weep you no more, sad fountains.” His Lachrimae is a collection for viol-and-lute ensemble.

Learn more about Dowland, John with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born 1562/63, Westminster, London, Eng.—died Jan. 21, 1626, London) English composer and lutenist. Educated at Oxford, he was refused a court position in 1594 and, believing his adoptive Catholicism had been the cause, he left for the continent. There he traveled extensively and took a position at the Danish court. In 1612, when his compositions had made him famous, he was finally appointed lutenist to the English court. He published three collections of songs, including about 90 works for solo lute and some 80 lute songs, including “Come again, sweet love does now endite,” “ Flow my tears,” and “Weep you no more, sad fountains.” His Lachrimae is a collection for viol-and-lute ensemble.

Learn more about Dowland, John with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Come Again, sweet love doth now invite. is a song for soloist and lute or for small choir (typically SATB) by John Dowland.

The song is in typical bitter-sweet Dowland style and the first verse reads

Come again, sweet love doth now invite.
Thy graces that refrain, to do me due delight.
To see, to hear, to touch, to kiss, to die,
with thee again in sweetest sympathy.

It was published in his "First Booke of Songes or Ayres" (1597).

Recent performers include Sting with lutenist Edin Karamazov.

See http://www.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Come_again_sweet_love_doth_now_invite_(John_Dowland)

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