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Dion

Dion

Dion, Stéphane, 1955-, Canadian politician, b. Quebec, grad. Laval Univ., Quebec (B.A. 1977, M.A. 1979), Institut d'études politiques, Paris. A political science professor at the Univ. of Moncton, N.B. (1984), and the Univ. of Montreal (1984-96), he was first elected to the Canadian parliament, as a Liberal, in 1996. He served as minister of intergovernmental affairs (1996-2003) and minister of the environment (2004-6) under Jean Chrétien and Paul Martin, respectively. Following the Liberal party's defeat in the 2006 elections, Martin resigned as party leader, and Dion, who was not favored to succeed him, was nonetheless elected to the post. Under Dion the party lost additional seats in the 2008 elections, and when he later resigned Michael Ignatieff became interim party leader. Dion is noted as the author of the Clarity Act (2000), which set precise and strict terms for any future move to establish independence for Quebec.
Boucicault, Dion, 1822?-1890, Anglo-Irish dramatist and actor. At 19 he had success with his play London Assurance at Covent Garden, London. In 1853 he went to the United States with his wife, Agnes Robertson, an actress who was the adopted daughter of Charles Kean. Boucicault became known for his work there as well as in London. A prolific writer who successfully employed theatrical tricks, he wrote or adapted over 300 farces, comedies, and melodramas, in which he often acted. The most notable of these were Grimaldi (1855), The Sidewalks of New York (1857), The Octoroon (1859), The Colleen Bawn (1860), Arrah-na-Pogue (1864), Rip Van Winkle (1865, with Joseph Jefferson), The O'Dowd (1873), and The Shaughraun (1874). The growth of the road company that performs one play owes much to Boucicault's influence.

See his Art of Acting (1916); study by R. G. Hogan (1969).

orig. Dionysius Lardner Boursiquot

(born Dec. 26, 1820/22, Dublin, Ire.—died Sept. 18, 1890, New York, N.Y., U.S.) Irish-born U.S. playwright. He began acting in 1837 and wrote the successful comedy London Assurance (1841) and The Corsican Brothers (1852). In 1853 he moved to New York City, where he was instrumental in obtaining the first copyright law for drama in the U.S. His successful play The Poor of New York (1857) was presented elsewhere—as, for example, The Poor of London. Concerned with social themes, he wrote a veiled attack on slavery in The Octoroon (1859). He also wrote a series of popular Irish plays, including The Colleen Bawn (1860) and The Shaughraun (1874).

Learn more about Boucicault, Dion with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Dionysius Lardner Boursiquot

(born Dec. 26, 1820/22, Dublin, Ire.—died Sept. 18, 1890, New York, N.Y., U.S.) Irish-born U.S. playwright. He began acting in 1837 and wrote the successful comedy London Assurance (1841) and The Corsican Brothers (1852). In 1853 he moved to New York City, where he was instrumental in obtaining the first copyright law for drama in the U.S. His successful play The Poor of New York (1857) was presented elsewhere—as, for example, The Poor of London. Concerned with social themes, he wrote a veiled attack on slavery in The Octoroon (1859). He also wrote a series of popular Irish plays, including The Colleen Bawn (1860) and The Shaughraun (1874).

Learn more about Boucicault, Dion with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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