Cummings

Cummings

[kuhm-ingz]
Cummings, E. E. (Edward Estlin Cummings), 1894-1962, American poet, b. Cambridge, Mass., grad. Harvard, 1915. His poetry, noted for its eccentricities of typography, language, and punctuation, usually seeks to convey a joyful, living awareness of sex and love. Among his 15 volumes of poetry are Tulips and Chimneys (1923), Is 5 (1926), and 95 Poems (1958). A prose account of his war internment in France, The Enormous Room (1922), is considered one of the finest books ever written about World War I. Cummings was also an accomplished artist whose paintings and drawings were exhibited in several one-man shows.

See his Complete Poems, 1913-1962 (2 vol., 1972); biographies by R. S. Kennedy (1980) and C. Sawyer-Lauçcanno (2004); N. Friedman, Cummings: The Growth of a Writer (1980).

Cummings, Homer Stillé, 1870-1956, American lawyer, U.S. Attorney General (1933-39), b. Chicago. He practiced law in Stamford, Conn., where he was mayor three times. He served as chairman of the Democratic National Committee (1919-20). In 1937 after the Supreme Court had overturned New Deal enabling legislation, Cummings drafted a proposal to give President Roosevelt the power to appoint a new justice to the Supreme Court to supplement any incumbent older than 70; this "court packing" plan was defeated by Congress.
Cummings is a common English language last name of Scottish origin. It may refer to the following people:

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