Definitions

Cullen

Cullen

[kuhl-uhn]
Cullen, Countee, 1903-46, American poet, b. New York City, grad. New York Univ. 1925, M.A. Harvard, 1926. A major writer of the Harlem Renaissance—a flowering of black artistic and literary talent in the 1920s—Cullen wrote poetry inspired by American black life. His technique was conventional, modeled on that of John Keats, and his mood passed from racial pride and optimism in the 1920s to sadness and disappointment in the 1930s. Among his volumes of verse are Color (1925), Copper Sun (1927), The Ballad of the Brown Girl (1927), and On These I Stand (1947).

See biography by A. R. Chucard (1984); bibliography by M. Penny (1971).

William Cullen Bryant, detail of an oil painting by Daniel Huntington, 1866; in the Brooklyn Museum elipsis

(born Nov. 3, 1794, Cummington, Mass., U.S.—died June 12, 1878, New York, N.Y.) U.S. poet. At age 17 Bryant wrote “Thanatopsis,” a meditation on nature and death that remains his best-known poem; influenced by deism, it in turn influenced Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Admitted to the bar at age 21, he spent nearly 10 years as an attorney, a profession he hated. His Poems (1821), including “To a Waterfowl,” secured his reputation. In 1825 he moved to New York City, where for almost 50 years (1829–78) he was editor in chief of the Evening Post, which he transformed into an organ of progressive thought.

Learn more about Bryant, William Cullen with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Countee Porter

(born May 30, 1903, Louisville, Ky.?, U.S.—died Jan. 9, 1946, New York, N.Y.) U.S. poet of the Harlem Renaissance. Reared in New York City, he was unofficially adopted at age 15 by a minister. He won a citywide poetry contest and later attended New York and Harvard universities, winning academic honours. His first collection of poems, Color (1925), received critical acclaim while he was still in college. Copper Sun (1927) was criticized in the black community for not giving enough attention to the issue of race. He taught in the city's public schools from 1934 until his death.

Learn more about Cullen, Countee with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Countee Porter

(born May 30, 1903, Louisville, Ky.?, U.S.—died Jan. 9, 1946, New York, N.Y.) U.S. poet of the Harlem Renaissance. Reared in New York City, he was unofficially adopted at age 15 by a minister. He won a citywide poetry contest and later attended New York and Harvard universities, winning academic honours. His first collection of poems, Color (1925), received critical acclaim while he was still in college. Copper Sun (1927) was criticized in the black community for not giving enough attention to the issue of race. He taught in the city's public schools from 1934 until his death.

Learn more about Cullen, Countee with a free trial on Britannica.com.

William Cullen Bryant, detail of an oil painting by Daniel Huntington, 1866; in the Brooklyn Museum elipsis

(born Nov. 3, 1794, Cummington, Mass., U.S.—died June 12, 1878, New York, N.Y.) U.S. poet. At age 17 Bryant wrote “Thanatopsis,” a meditation on nature and death that remains his best-known poem; influenced by deism, it in turn influenced Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Admitted to the bar at age 21, he spent nearly 10 years as an attorney, a profession he hated. His Poems (1821), including “To a Waterfowl,” secured his reputation. In 1825 he moved to New York City, where for almost 50 years (1829–78) he was editor in chief of the Evening Post, which he transformed into an organ of progressive thought.

Learn more about Bryant, William Cullen with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Cullen is a town in Webster Parish, Louisiana, United States. The population was 1,296 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Minden Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography

Cullen is located at (32.969335, -93.448092).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.2 square miles (3.0 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,296 people, 505 households, and 319 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,109.6 people per square mile (427.7/km²). There were 600 housing units at an average density of 513.7/sq mi (198.0/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 13.35% White, 84.88% African American, 0.46% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 0.23% from other races, and 0.93% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.69% of the population.

There were 505 households out of which 29.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 28.1% were married couples living together, 27.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.8% were non-families. 32.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.28.

In the town the population was spread out with 30.2% under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 24.5% from 25 to 44, 20.6% from 45 to 64, and 16.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 77.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 66.4 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $15,319, and the median income for a family was $18,854. Males had a median income of $20,368 versus $18,393 for females. The per capita income for the town was $8,307. About 31.3% of families and 39.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 52.3% of those under age 18 and 30.3% of those age 65 or over.

References

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