Copperas Cove

Copperas Cove

[kop-er-uhs]
Copperas Cove, town (1990 pop. 24,079), Coryell co., central Tex. In a farm and ranch area, the town owes much of its existence to U.S. Fort Hood, which it adjoins.
Copperas Cove is a city in Bell, Coryell, and Lampasas Counties in the U.S. state of Texas. The population was 29,592 at the 2000 census. It is located on the western edge of Fort Hood.

Copperas Cove is part of the KilleenTemple–Fort Hood Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography

Copperas Cove is located at (31.119700, -97.901749).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 13.9 square miles (36.1 km²), all of it land.

History

It all began in the 1870s as a rural community centered around a small store about two miles southwest of the present townsite. Late that decade residents of the area applied for a post office under the name Cove, but postal authorities rejected the name because a Texas post office by that name already existed. The name Coperas Cove was then submitted, inspired by the mineral taste of the water in a nearby spring. The Coperas Cove post office was established in March 1879 with Marsden Ogletree as postmaster. A feeder route of the Chisholm Trail passed through Coperas Cove, making the cattle industry of primary importance to the local economy. When the Gulf, Colorado, and Santa Fe Railway built its track across the southern corner of Coryell County in 1882, residents of Coperas Cove moved their community two miles to the northeast in order to take better advantage of the rail service. By 1884 the town had a steam gristmill-cotton gin, five general stores, a hotel, and 150 residents. By the mid-1890s the population had risen to 300, and residents had voted to form their own school district. Although cattle production continued to be important to the local economy, area farmers began to devote more of their resources to the production of cotton, small grains, and feed crops, and by 1900 farming was the dominant occupation. The spelling of the community's name was officially changed in 1901; at that time Copperas Cove had an opera house, three hotels, and a variety of businesses. A local private bank opened in 1906. By the time residents elected their first mayor in 1913, the population had grown to 600. The number of residents continued to increased through the 1920s, to a high of 650 in 1929. Copperas Cove began to decline with the onset of the Great Depression in the early 1930s. The local bank failed, several businesses closed, and many people left to look for work in other areas. By the 1940s only 356 residents remained. Copperas Cove received a much-needed boost in the early 1940s, when the United States government chose southeastern Coryell and northwestern Bell counties as the site for Camp Hood, a new military training center. By 1950 when Fort Hood opened, the community had grown to 1,052 residents, and the city limit was extended southwest into Lampasas County. The population was estimated at 4,567 in 1960, at 10,818 in 1970, and at 19,469 in 1980. Most of the new residents were either attracted by the job opportunities associated with Fort Hood or chose to remain in the area after retirement from the military. By 1990 Copperas Cove had several manufacturing establishments, a wide variety of businesses,and a population of 24,079.

Annual Events and Festivals

  • Rabbit Fest- Third Weekend in May - Typically involves, live music and performances by local groups. Normally including bands from Copperas Cove, performers from dance/gymnastics center GymKix and from performances from choirs of the school district. Festival includes a carnival, car shows, booths, and the Brazos Bottom Cowographers. Located in Copperas Cove City Park.
  • Ogletree Gap Heritage Festival - Third Weekend in October - Just what it says an old time, 1800s festival, located in Ogletree Gap near the edge of Copperas Cove, Brazos Bottom Cowographers usually attend this event.
  • Krist Kindl Markt - First Weekend in December- located in Downtown Copperas Cove. German Style open air Christmas market sponsored by the Downtown Association. Typically involves, live music and performances by local groups performers from dance/gymnastics center GymKix and from performances from choirs of the school district. This usually involves a Christmas Parade, in recent years it has become a night parade with Christmas lights on the floats.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 29,592 people, 10,273 households, and 8,023 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,124.9 people per square mile (820.2/km²). There were 11,120 housing units at an average density of 798.5/sq mi (308.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 65.36% White, 20.43% African American, 0.87% Native American, 2.70% Asian, 0.58% Pacific Islander, 4.98% from other races, and 5.09% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.69% of the population.It is located in Coryell County.

There were 10,273 households out of which 47.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.2% were married couples living together, 12.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.9% were non-families. 16.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.19.

In the city the population was spread out with 32.0% under the age of 18, 14.2% from 18 to 24, 33.3% from 25 to 44, 15.4% from 45 to 64, and 5.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 27 years. For every 100 females there were 98.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,869, and the median income for a family was $40,517. Males had a median income of $26,406 versus $22,270 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,995. About 8.1% of families and 9.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.8% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.

Education

The City of Copperas Cove is served by the Copperas Cove Independent School District. Every school in the district is TEA (Texas Education Agency) acceptable, many are recognized, some have been noted as exemplary.

The School District includes 9 Elementary schools, 2 Junior High Schools, and Alternative Learning Center, and 1 High School.

Elementary grades Pre-K - 5th

  • Martin Walker Elementary
  • Mae Stevens Elementary
  • J.L. Williams/ Lovett Ledger Elementary Schools
  • Hettie Halstead Elementary
  • Fairview/Miss Jewell Elementary Schools
  • C.R. Clements/Hollie Parsons Elementary Schools

Junior High Schools grade level 6-8

  • Copperas Cove Junior High
  • S.C. Lee Junior High

High School grade level 9 -12

  • Copperas Cove High

Alternative School

  • Avenue E. Alternative Learning Center

Cove mostly recognized for football team Copperas Cove Bulldawgs, also holds a champion Lady Dawg Basketball team.

Famous athletes from Copperas Cove include:

T.J. Hollowell

  • played in college for the University of Nebraska
  • played in the NFL for the New York Jets and Denver Broncos

Vontez Duff

Charles "Peanut" Tillman

  • four year starter for The University of Louisiana at Lafayette
  • plays for Chicago Bears 2004-present

Sherika Wright

  • played in college for Purdue
  • played in the WNBA for Phoenix Mercury
  • asst. coach for Texas Tech Lady Raiders

Heart of Texas Bowl

Copperas Cove plays host to an annual junior college football bowl game, the C.H.A.M.P.S. Heart of Texas Bowl. The first HOT bowl was held in 2001.

References

External links

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