confection

candy

[kan-dee]

Sweet sugar- or chocolate-based confection. The Egyptians made candy from honey (combined with figs, dates, nuts, and spices), sugar being unknown. With the spread of sugarcane cultivation in the 15th century, the industry began to grow. In the late 18th century the first candy-manufacturing machinery was produced. The main ingredients are cane and beet sugars combined with other carbohydrate foods such as corn syrup, cornstarch, honey, molasses, and maple sugar. To the sweet base are added chocolate, fruits, nuts, peanuts, eggs, milk, flavours, and colours. Common varieties include hard candies (crystallized sugar), caramels and toffees, nougats, jellies, fondants, marshmallows, marzipans, truffles, cotton candies, licorices, and chewing gums.

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Pacers is a discontinued brand of popular mint flavoured confection.

Opal Mints were plain white coloured chewy spearmint flavoured candy (UK sweets) launched as a sister product to Opal Fruits (now known as Starburst). The product was then relaunched as Pacers. Later, three diagonal green stripes were added to the sweet. The brand was discontinued in the 1980s.

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