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Clementi

Clementi

[kluh-men-tee; It. kle-men-tee]
Clementi, Muzio, 1752-1832, Italian composer, pianist, and conductor, b. Rome. He wrote more than 100 keyboard sonatas, which set the definitive form, and he had an enormous influence on almost everything concerning the piano. Educated in Italy, he went (1766) to England to live and study. In 1773 he caused a sensation in London as a pianist and conductor; there he conducted the Italian Opera from 1777 to 1780. In 1780 he went on a concert tour of Europe, which climaxed in a piano contest with Mozart. He returned to London in 1782 and, except for tours on the Continent (1802, 1810, 1820-21), spent the rest of his life there. Clementi amassed a fortune as performer, conductor, and proprietor of a piano factory and publishing house. Teacher of many musicians, including the pianists J. B. Cramer and John Field and the composer Meyerbeer, he is especially remembered for his series of études, Gradus ad Parnassum (1817); he also wrote several symphonies.

See catalog by A. Tyson (1967).

(born Jan. 23, 1752, Rome, Papal States—died March 10, 1832, Evesham, Worcestershire, Eng.) Italian-born British pianist, composer, publisher, and manufacturer. Taken to England at age 13 by a wealthy English traveler who had heard his organ playing, he pursued a rigid course of music studies for seven years while living on his patron's country estate. His keyboard playing and early sonatas gained him renown in London. In 1781 he and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart competed before the emperor, and he later toured extensively as conductor and pianist. In 1798 he restarted a successful music-publishing and piano-manufacturing firm. His piano pieces were highly influential, and he taught many leading pianists. His works include more than 100 piano sonatas and Gradus ad Parnassum, 3 vol. (1817–26), a popular pedagogical set of 100 diverse piano pieces.

Learn more about Clementi, Muzio with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Jan. 23, 1752, Rome, Papal States—died March 10, 1832, Evesham, Worcestershire, Eng.) Italian-born British pianist, composer, publisher, and manufacturer. Taken to England at age 13 by a wealthy English traveler who had heard his organ playing, he pursued a rigid course of music studies for seven years while living on his patron's country estate. His keyboard playing and early sonatas gained him renown in London. In 1781 he and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart competed before the emperor, and he later toured extensively as conductor and pianist. In 1798 he restarted a successful music-publishing and piano-manufacturing firm. His piano pieces were highly influential, and he taught many leading pianists. His works include more than 100 piano sonatas and Gradus ad Parnassum, 3 vol. (1817–26), a popular pedagogical set of 100 diverse piano pieces.

Learn more about Clementi, Muzio with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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