Chesterton

Chesterton

[ches-ter-tuhn]
Chesterton, G. K. (Gilbert Keith Chesterton), 1874-1936, English author. Conservative, even reactionary, in his thinking, Chesterton was a convert (1922) to Roman Catholicism and its champion. He has been called the "prince of paradox" because his dogma is often hidden beneath a light, energetic, and whimsical style. A prolific writer, Chesterton wrote studies of Browning (1903) and Dickens (1906); several novels including The Napoleon of Notting Hill (1904) and The Man Who Was Thursday (1908); a noted series of crime stories featuring Father Brown as detective; many poems, collected in 1927; and his famous essays, collected in Tremendous Trifles (1909), Come to Think of It (1930), and other volumes. He was the editor of G. K.'s Weekly, an organ of the Distributist League, which advocated the small-holding system. An amusing artist, he illustrated books by Hilaire Belloc, his friend and collaborator.

See his autobiography (1936); the Ignatius Press edition of his complete works (1990-); biographies by D. Barker (1973) and M. Ffinch (1986); studies by C. Hollis (1970), J. West (1915, repr. 1973), A. S. Dale (1985), and Q. Lauer (1988).

G.K. Chesterton, chalk drawing by James Gunn, 1932; in the National Portrait Gallery, London.

(born May 29, 1874, London, Eng.—died June 14, 1936, Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire) British man of letters. Chesterton was a journalist, a scholar, a novelist and short-story writer, and a poet. His works of social and literary criticism include Robert Browning (1903), Charles Dickens (1906), and The Victorian Age in Literature (1913). Even before his conversion to Roman Catholicism in 1922, he was interested in theology and religious argument. His fiction includes The Napoleon of Notting Hill (1904), the popular allegorical novel The Man Who Was Thursday (1908), and his most successful creation, the series of detective novels featuring the priest-sleuth Father Brown.

Learn more about Chesterton, G(ilbert) K(eith) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

G.K. Chesterton, chalk drawing by James Gunn, 1932; in the National Portrait Gallery, London.

(born May 29, 1874, London, Eng.—died June 14, 1936, Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire) British man of letters. Chesterton was a journalist, a scholar, a novelist and short-story writer, and a poet. His works of social and literary criticism include Robert Browning (1903), Charles Dickens (1906), and The Victorian Age in Literature (1913). Even before his conversion to Roman Catholicism in 1922, he was interested in theology and religious argument. His fiction includes The Napoleon of Notting Hill (1904), the popular allegorical novel The Man Who Was Thursday (1908), and his most successful creation, the series of detective novels featuring the priest-sleuth Father Brown.

Learn more about Chesterton, G(ilbert) K(eith) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Chesterton is a town in Westchester, Jackson and Liberty townships, Porter County, Indiana, United States. The population was 10,488 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Chesterton is located at (41.604251, -87.058442).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 8.6 square miles (22.4 km²), of which, 8.5 square miles (22.0 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.3 km²) of it (1.27%) is water. Just north of the town is Indiana Dunes State Park. Most of the town is flat. However, going south into the city on Route 49 on the overpass, one can see the Valparaiso Moraine in the distance.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 10,488 people, 4,039 households, and 2,879 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,232.0 people per square mile (475.8/km²). There were 4,212 housing units at an average density of 494.8/sq mi (191.1/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 96.29% White, 0.44% African American, 0.21% Native American, 1.37% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.51% from other races, and 1.16% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.31% of the population.

There were 4,039 households out of which 36.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.3% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.7% were non-families. 23.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the town the population was spread out with 26.8% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 29.6% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.3 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $55,530, and the median income for a family was $66,239. Males had a median income of $50,599 versus $28,300 for females. The per capita income for the town was $26,539. About 3.1% of families and 4.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under age 18 and 4.2% of those age 65 or over.

Miscellaneous

  • United Airlines NC13304, the first known case of an attack against an aircraft, was downed by nitroglycerine bomb above Chesterton on October 10, 1933. All 7 persons aboard the aircraft -- four passengers and a crew of three -- were killed in the crash.
  • The South Shore Line (NICTD) has their headquarters here.
  • MTV came to Chesterton in Spring 2008 and filmed their hit reality-TV show MADE. Courtney Jurick was made in to a BMX racer and Marie Kosakowski was made into a hip-hop dancer. Both shows aired on 9/13/08.

Famous people from Chesterton

References

External links

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