Charlotte Saunders Cushman

Charlotte Saunders Cushman

[koosh-muhn]
Cushman, Charlotte Saunders, 1816-76, one of the first outstanding American actresses, b. Boston. Cushman turned from opera to drama and in 1835 first played Lady Macbeth, the role in which she was said to be unequaled. Her portrayals of Romeo and Hamlet won her popular favor, but her most celebrated role was Meg Merrilies in Scott's Guy Mannering. An actress of dramatic power and regal bearing, she was the first of her profession to be elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans (1915).

See biography by J. Leach (1970); J. Markus, Across an Untried Sea (2000).

Charlotte Cushman as Meg Merrilies in Guy Mannering.

(born July 23, 1816, Boston, Mass., U.S.—died Feb. 18, 1876, Boston) U.S. actress. She made her opera debut in Boston at age 19, but her singing voice soon failed and she turned to acting. In 1837 she first played her most popular role, Meg Merrilies in Guy Mannering, and she became the first native-born U.S. theatre star. From 1842 she managed a theatre in Philadelphia, where she starred with William Macready in Macbeth. In 1854–55 she toured England to great acclaim. Noted for her powerful emotional reach, she portrayed Lady Macbeth and male roles such as Romeo and Hamlet.

Learn more about Cushman, Charlotte (Saunders) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Charlotte Saunders Cushman (July 23, 1816February 18, 1876) was an American stage actress.

Early life

Born in Boston, Massachusetts, she was encouraged by her mother to take up singing and after attempting opera unsuccessfully, she tried acting, making her stage debut in 1836 in New Orleans.

She went on to become one of the greatest actresses of her day, successful at home as well as on the London stage. She made England her home for several years, becoming friends with the author Geraldine Jewsbury, who is said to have based a character on Cushman in her 1848 novel The Half Sisters.

Stage/theater career

She made her stage debut in Boston in 1835, in the opera The Marriage of Figaro. The following year she debuted as Lady Macbeth, and her interpretation was more energetic than previous players. After a successful season in New Orleans, she returned to New York City under contract with the Bowery Theatre. She scored a success to rave reviews in Albany, New York, again playing Lady Macbeth.

By 1839, her younger sister Susan Webb Cushman became an actress, and at the age of 14 had married Nelson Merriman. Her husband left her shortly thereafter, pregnant, leaving Charlotte to care for her sister. The two sisters became famous for playing Romeo and Juliet together, with Charlotte playing the part of Romeo Montague.

In 1843, Cushman became involved romantically with Rosalie Sully, a daughter of artist Thomas Sully. By 1844, the romance had ended. She began travelling abroad acting in theater, and Sully died shortly thereafter.

In 1848, Cushman met journalist, writer and part time actress Matilda Hays. The two women became close friends, and after a short amount of time and some correspondence, they became involved in a lesbian affair. For the next ten years the two would be together almost entirely. They became known for dressing alike, and in Europe were publicly known as a couple.

In 1849, Cushman returned to America, but by 1852 she had decided to retire from the stage and took up residence with Hays in Rome, Italy. They began living in an American expatriate community there, made up mostly of many lesbian artists and sculptors of the time. Cushman used her notoriety to promote the works of African American/Native American sculptor Edmonia Lewis, who had become a close friend, and whom Cushman greatly admired.

In 1854, Hays left Cushman for lesbian sculptor Harriet Hosmer, which launched a series of jealous interactions between the three women. Hays eventually returned to live with Cushman, but the tensions between her and Cushman would never be repaired. By late 1857, Cushman was secretly involved with lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins. One night while Cushman was writing a note, Hays walked in on her. Suspecting that the note was to Stebbins, Hays demanded to see it. Although Cushman maintained that the note was not to Stebbins, she refused to show it to Hays. The altercation that followed was explosive. Hays became enraged, and began chasing Cushman around the house pounding her at every opportunity with her fists. The relationship ended immediately, and Hays moved out. She then sued Cushman stating in her claim that she had sacrificed her own career to support Cushman's career, and therefore was due a certain payment. Cushman paid her an unknown sum, and the two women parted company forever.

Emma Stebbins moved in with Cushman shortly after the break-up. Cushman traveled to America for a short tour a couple of months later. Although Cushman maintained that she was devoted to Stebbins, she became involved with another woman not long after her relationship with Stebbins began. Cushman had met 18 year old actress Emma Crow, and Cushman immediately fell for her. The two women began an affair, and Cushman often called her "my little lover".

Before her departure to Italy, Cushman offered a farewell performance at the Washington Theater in the title role of Hamlet. The poster advertising her appearance describes her as "a lady universally acknowledged as the greatest living tragic actress".

When Cushman returned to Italy, Crow followed. Not long after arriving in Italy, Crow attracted the attention of Cushman's nephew, Ned Cushman. In April 1861, Ned and Emma Crow married.

In 1869, Cushman underwent treatment for breast cancer. Stebbins ignored her own sculpting career and devoted all of her time to caring for Cushman.

Charlotte Cushman died of pneumonia in Boston in 1876, aged 59, and was interred in Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

In 1915 she was elected to the New York University Hall of Fame.

Notes and references

External links

Search another word or see charlotte saunders cushmanon Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;