Chamorro

Chamorro

[chuh-mawr-oh; Sp. chah-mawr-raw]
Chamorro, Emiliano, 1871-1966, president of Nicaragua (1917-20, 1926). A conservative army chief, Chamorro supported the revolt (1909) against José Santos Zelaya. Originally at odds with the United States, he was a signer of the Bryan-Chamorro Treaty, which granted the United States an option on the Nicaragua Canal. He seized power by coup in 1925, but fled from office after the United States ordered gunboats to the country the next year.
Chamorro, Violeta Barrios de, 1929-, president of Nicaragua (1990-97). Widow of martyred newspaper editor Joaquim Chamorro, she briefly joined the ruling Sandinista junta following the 1979 revolution. Opposed to the direction of the revolution, she resigned and converted the Chamorro family newspaper, La Prensa, into a major opposition organ. She was elected president in an upset victory (1990), becoming the first woman to govern a Central American nation. In office, she instituted a program of national reconciliation, brought an end to the U.S.-backed Contra war, and ended Sandinista control of the military.

(born Oct. 18, 1929, Rivas province, Nic.) President of Nicaragua (1990–96). Born into a wealthy family, she married the publisher of La Prensa, a newspaper that opposed the Anastasio Somoza dictatorship (see Somoza family). After her husband was assassinated in 1978, she took his place as publisher. When the Sandinistas overthrew Somoza, she served briefly on a ruling civilian junta, but her newspaper soon became critical of Daniel Ortega and supportive of U.S. policies, which included extensive support for the anti-Sandinista contras. Advocating an end to military and economic conflicts with the U.S., she was elected president in 1990. Her presidency was troubled by continuing deep political divisions and the significant power still held by the Sandinistas.

Learn more about Chamorro, Violeta (Barrios de) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Oct. 18, 1929, Rivas province, Nic.) President of Nicaragua (1990–96). Born into a wealthy family, she married the publisher of La Prensa, a newspaper that opposed the Anastasio Somoza dictatorship (see Somoza family). After her husband was assassinated in 1978, she took his place as publisher. When the Sandinistas overthrew Somoza, she served briefly on a ruling civilian junta, but her newspaper soon became critical of Daniel Ortega and supportive of U.S. policies, which included extensive support for the anti-Sandinista contras. Advocating an end to military and economic conflicts with the U.S., she was elected president in 1990. Her presidency was troubled by continuing deep political divisions and the significant power still held by the Sandinistas.

Learn more about Chamorro, Violeta (Barrios de) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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