Carrier

Carrier

[kar-ee-er]
Carrier, Jean Baptiste, 1756-94, French Revolutionary. An extreme Jacobin, he demanded the establishment of a revolutionary tribunal, and, as a revolutionary representative to Nantes in the Reign of Terror, he instituted noyades, or wholesale drownings, and committed other atrocities. Although he was denounced to the Convention, of which he was a member, and was recalled to Paris, he temporarily escaped punishment during the Thermidorian reaction (July, 1794; see Thermidor). In November, however, he was tried by the Convention and executed.
Carrier, Willis Haviland, 1876-1950, American engineer who played a key role in inventing air conditioning, b. Angola, N.Y., grad. Cornell (M.E. 1901). Working for the Buffalo Forge Co. (1901-14), he developed (1902) a dehumidifier and discovered that circulating air over cold pipes not only removed water from the air but cooled it. He soon refined his concept, and his company set up (1907) a subsidiary to exploit his ideas. In a 1911 paper Carrier outlined the scientific underpinnings of air conditioning and explained its main design features. In 1915 he and several fellow workers founded the Carrier Corp., and he served as its president (1915-30) and chairman (1930-48). Often called the father of air conditioner, Carrier eventually held more than 80 related patents, and his company became one of the industry's major manufacturers.

See biography by M. Ingels (1949, repr. 1972).

Naval vessel equipped with a platform that allows airplanes to take off and land. Takeoffs are facilitated by the use of catapults or by a ramp at the end of the flight deck. For landing, aircraft are fitted with retractable hooks that engage arresting wires on the deck, or they are built with vectored-thrust engines that allow them to be landed vertically. Britain's Royal Navy developed the first true aircraft carrier near the end of World War I, and carriers played leading roles in World War II naval engagements such as the Pearl Harbor attack and the Battles of Midway and the Coral Sea. The largest modern carriers are 1,000-ft (300-m) nuclear-powered vessels of the U.S. Navy, which can carry 100 jet aircraft. Other types include the light carrier, equipped for anti-submarine warfare and ground attack, and the helicopter carrier, intended for conducting amphibious assault.

Learn more about aircraft carrier with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Nov. 26, 1876, Angola, N.Y., U.S.—died Oct. 7, 1950, New York, N.Y.) U.S. inventor and industrialist. Carrier designed the first system to control temperature and humidity in 1902. His “Rational Psychrometric Formulae,” introduced in 1911, initiated scientific air-conditioning design. In 1915 he cofounded the Carrier Engineering Company, which became the world's largest manufacturer of air-conditioning equipment. Carrier was purchased by United Technologies Corporation in 1979.

Learn more about Carrier, Willis Haviland with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Nov. 26, 1876, Angola, N.Y., U.S.—died Oct. 7, 1950, New York, N.Y.) U.S. inventor and industrialist. Carrier designed the first system to control temperature and humidity in 1902. His “Rational Psychrometric Formulae,” introduced in 1911, initiated scientific air-conditioning design. In 1915 he cofounded the Carrier Engineering Company, which became the world's largest manufacturer of air-conditioning equipment. Carrier was purchased by United Technologies Corporation in 1979.

Learn more about Carrier, Willis Haviland with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Carrier has various meanings:

In Science (physics, electronics, biology, mathematics, chemistry and other sciences):

'''Technology:

Ethnography and geography:

Commerce:

  • Wireless carrier, an organization that operates a wireless network for mobile phones
  • Common carrier, an organization that transports a product or service using its facilities, or those of other carriers, and offers its services to the general public
  • Carrier Corporation, the air conditioning and commercial refrigeration manufacturing division of United Technologies, named after its founder, Willis Carrier
  • Carrier (telephony, networking), A term used to refer to various telephone companies that provide local, long distance or value added services. A system or systems whereby many channels of electrical information can be carried over a single transmission path
  • CARRIERS-interconnect, software company that offers products and solutions for worldwide telecommunication businesses
  • Mail carrier, a postal worker

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