Definitions

Cabell

Cabell

[kab-uhl]
Cabell, Branch (James Branch Cabell), 1879-1958, American novelist, b. Richmond, Va., grad. William and Mary, 1898. After various experiences as a journalist and a coal miner he began writing fiction. His early works, which are sophisticated novels deriding conventional history, include Gallantry (1907), Chivalry (1909), and The Rivet in Grandfather's Neck (1915). Many of Cabell's most popular novels are set in the imaginary medieval kingdom of Poictesme; among these are The Cream of the Jest (1917), Jurgen (1919)—Cabell's most famous work because of its attempted suppression on charges of obscenity—and The Silver Stallion (1926). Cabell's novels are usually pointedly antirealistic, and many of them can be considered moral allegories. Although he was enormously popular in the 1920s, his highly artifical prose style and subject matter lost favor with critics and public alike by the 1930s. His nonfictional writing includes Beyond Life (1919), The St. Johns (with A. J. Hanna, 1943), and Here Let Me Lie (1947).

See studies by J. L. Davis (1962), D. Tarrant (1967), H. Walpole (1920, repr. 1973), and L. D. Rubin (1959, repr. 1973).

(born Jan. 21, 1821, near Lexington, Ky., U.S.—died May 17, 1875, Lexington) U.S. politician, vice president (1857–61), and Confederate army officer. He practiced law and later served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1851–55). In 1856 he was elected vice president under James Buchanan. In 1860 the Democratic Party split into factions over the slavery issue, and Breckinridge became the Southern wing's nominee for president. Defeated by Abraham Lincoln, he worked for compromise; but after the firing on Fort Sumter he urged Kentucky to secede. He became a general in the Confederate army and took part in the Vicksburg, Wilderness, and Shenandoah Valley campaigns. He served as Confederate secretary of war in 1865. After the war he fled to England for three years before returning to Kentucky to resume his law practice.

Learn more about Breckinridge, John C(abell) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Jan. 21, 1821, near Lexington, Ky., U.S.—died May 17, 1875, Lexington) U.S. politician, vice president (1857–61), and Confederate army officer. He practiced law and later served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1851–55). In 1856 he was elected vice president under James Buchanan. In 1860 the Democratic Party split into factions over the slavery issue, and Breckinridge became the Southern wing's nominee for president. Defeated by Abraham Lincoln, he worked for compromise; but after the firing on Fort Sumter he urged Kentucky to secede. He became a general in the Confederate army and took part in the Vicksburg, Wilderness, and Shenandoah Valley campaigns. He served as Confederate secretary of war in 1865. After the war he fled to England for three years before returning to Kentucky to resume his law practice.

Learn more about Breckinridge, John C(abell) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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