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Braudel

Braudel

[broh-del]
Braudel, Fernand, 1902-85, French historian. He studied under Lucien Febvre and was a founder of the Annales school of historiography. As a German prisoner-of-war during World War II, he wrote his monumental The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean World in the Age of Philip II (1949). After the war, he was professor at the Collège de France in Paris, (1949-72), editor of the journal Annales, a founder (1963) of the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme, and president of the VIth Section of the École des Hautes Études (1952-56).

(born Aug. 24, 1902, Luméville, France—died Nov. 28, 1985, Haute-Savoie) French historian and educator. While a prisoner of the Germans during World War II, Braudel wrote from memory his thesis on the history of the Mediterranean region in the 16th century, later published as The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean World in the Age of Phillip II (1949). With Marc Bloch and Lucien Febvre, he became an influential leader of the Annales school, which emphasized the effects of factors such as climate, geography, and demographics on history. His second major work was Civilization and Capitalism, 15th–18th Century (1967, 1979).

Learn more about Braudel, (Paul Achille) Fernand with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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