Bradley

Bradley

[brad-lee]
Bradley, Andrew Cecil, 1851-1935, English scholar and critic, b. Cheltenham; brother of Francis Herbert Bradley. He taught at Oxford for many years and was professor of poetry there (1901-6). Bradley is known for his Shakespearean Tragedy (1904), a classic work of criticism noted for its exposition of Hamlet, Othello, and Macbeth as psychological beings and of Shakespeare as a consummate interpreter of the human soul. Bradley's other works include Oxford Lectures on Poetry (1909) and Ideals of Religion (1940).
Bradley, Bill (William Warren Bradley), 1943-, American athlete and politician, b. Crystal City, Mo. He first gained wide attention as an All-America basketball player at Princeton. Graduating in 1965, he attended Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar and in 1967-77 starred for the New York Knicks of the National Basketball Association. In 1979 he became a U.S. senator from New Jersey. Before retiring from the Senate in 1997, he gained a reputation as a reform-minded Democrat, influential especially on environmental, labor, and income-tax issues. Often mentioned as a possible presidential candidate, Bradley became (1999) a candidate for the 2000 Democratic presidential nomination, but he was defeated in the primaries by Al Gore. Bradley wrote about his visions for America's future in The Journey from Here (2000) and The New American Story (2007).

See his account of his Knicks years, Life on the Run (1976), and his memoir, Time Present, Time Past (1996).

Bradley, Francis Herbert, 1846-1924, English philosopher. He was educated at Oxford, where he became a fellow of Merton College in 1876. His works include Ethical Studies (1876), Principles of Logic (1883), and Appearance and Reality (1893). In logic, Bradley attacked the psychological tendencies of empiricism by differentiating sharply between the mental act as a psychological event and its universal meaning; to him only the latter was the concern of logic. In metaphysics Bradley held that many phenomena considered real, such as space and time, are only appearances. Reality, or what Bradley called the Absolute, is an all-inclusive whole that transcends thought. Although greatly influenced by Hegel, Bradley's metaphysics is generally considered a highly original contribution to philosophical thought.

See his collection of essays (2 vol., 1935) and T. S. Eliot, Knowledge and Experience in the Philosophy of F. H. Bradley (1989).

Bradley, James, 1693-1762, English astronomer. His discovery of the aberration of light, announced in 1728, provided an important line of evidence for the motion of the earth around the sun. In 1742 Bradley became the third Astronomer Royal. Under his direction the observatory at Greenwich was supplied with new instruments; with some of these he cataloged the positions of more than 3,000 stars. His second important discovery, the nutation, or "nodding," of the earth's axis, was only made known in 1748, after it had stood the test of careful observations over a period of nearly 19 years.
Bradley, Omar Nelson, 1893-1981, U.S. general, b. Clark, Mo. A graduate of West Point, he served in World War I and filled various army administrative and academic posts before assuming (1943) command of the 2d Corps in World War II. Bradley was active (1943) in the N African and Sicilian campaigns and led (1944) the U.S. 1st Army in the invasion of Normandy. Later he commanded the U.S. 12th Army Group in the battle for Germany. Bradley acted (1945-47) as administrator of veterans' affairs, was appointed (1948) chief of staff of the U.S. army, and served (1949-53) as first permanent chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. Promoted to general of the army in 1950, he retired in 1953 to become a business executive.

See his Soldier's Story (1951) and Collected Writings (4 vol., 1967).

Bradley, Tom (Thomas Bradley), 1917-98, African-American politician, b. Calvert, Tex. A sharecropper's son who became (1940) a Los Angeles police officer, he earned (1956) a law degree from Southwestern Law School and entered (1961) private practice. A Los Angeles city councilman (1963-73), he was elected the city's first black mayor in 1973. A liberal Democrat, he was reelected four times and served until 1993, during a period of Los Angeles's expansion. He ran unsuccessfully for governor of California in 1982 and 1986.

(born Dec. 29, 1917, Calvert, Texas, U.S.—died Sept. 29, 1998, Los Angeles, Calif.) Mayor of Los Angeles (1973–93). The son of a sharecropper, he moved with his family to Los Angeles when he was seven and endured poverty after his father abandoned the family. In 1940 he began a 22-year tenure with the city's police department, during which he earned a law degree (1956) by attending night school. In 1963 he became the city's first African American council member, and in 1973 he was elected one of the country's first two African American mayors of a major city (with Coleman Young of Detroit). During five terms as mayor, he helped transform Los Angeles into a bustling business and trading centre, overseeing massive growth and hosting the 1984 Olympic Games. He retired in 1992 after the city was consumed by riots following the acquittal of police officers in the beating of African American motorist Rodney King.

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(born Dec. 29, 1917, Calvert, Texas, U.S.—died Sept. 29, 1998, Los Angeles, Calif.) Mayor of Los Angeles (1973–93). The son of a sharecropper, he moved with his family to Los Angeles when he was seven and endured poverty after his father abandoned the family. In 1940 he began a 22-year tenure with the city's police department, during which he earned a law degree (1956) by attending night school. In 1963 he became the city's first African American council member, and in 1973 he was elected one of the country's first two African American mayors of a major city (with Coleman Young of Detroit). During five terms as mayor, he helped transform Los Angeles into a bustling business and trading centre, overseeing massive growth and hosting the 1984 Olympic Games. He retired in 1992 after the city was consumed by riots following the acquittal of police officers in the beating of African American motorist Rodney King.

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(born Feb. 12, 1893, Clark, Mo., U.S.—died April 8, 1981, New York, N.Y.) U.S. army commander. After graduating from West Point, he directed the army's infantry school at the start of World War II. In 1943 he commanded U.S. forces in the North Africa Campaign and contributed directly to the fall of Tunisia to the Allies; he then led the successful invasion of Sicily. As commander of the 1st Army, he helped plan the invasion of France and took part in the Normandy Campaign and the liberation of Paris. As commander of the 12th Army, the largest U.S. force ever placed under one general, he oversaw European operations until the German surrender. After the war he was appointed head of veterans' affairs (1945–47) and chief of staff of the army (1948–49). Admired by both officers and men, he was chosen the first chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (1949–53) and promoted to General of the Army (1950).

Learn more about Bradley, Omar N(elson) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Jan. 30, 1846, Clapham, Surrey, Eng.—died Sept. 18, 1924, Oxford) British idealist philosopher. Influenced by G.W.F. Hegel, he considered mind to be more fundamental than matter. In Ethical Studies (1876), he sought to expose confusions in utilitarianism. In The Principles of Logic (1883), he denounced the psychology of the empiricists. His most ambitious work, Appearance and Reality (1893), maintained that, though reality is spiritual, the thesis cannot be demonstrated because of the fatally abstract nature of human thought. Instead of ideas, which could not properly contain reality, he recommended feeling, the immediacy of which could embrace the harmonious nature of reality. He was the first English philosopher to be awarded the Order of Merit. His brother was the eminent poetry critic A.C. Bradley (1851–1935).

Learn more about Bradley, F(rancis) H(erbert) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Feb. 12, 1893, Clark, Mo., U.S.—died April 8, 1981, New York, N.Y.) U.S. army commander. After graduating from West Point, he directed the army's infantry school at the start of World War II. In 1943 he commanded U.S. forces in the North Africa Campaign and contributed directly to the fall of Tunisia to the Allies; he then led the successful invasion of Sicily. As commander of the 1st Army, he helped plan the invasion of France and took part in the Normandy Campaign and the liberation of Paris. As commander of the 12th Army, the largest U.S. force ever placed under one general, he oversaw European operations until the German surrender. After the war he was appointed head of veterans' affairs (1945–47) and chief of staff of the army (1948–49). Admired by both officers and men, he was chosen the first chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (1949–53) and promoted to General of the Army (1950).

Learn more about Bradley, Omar N(elson) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Jan. 30, 1846, Clapham, Surrey, Eng.—died Sept. 18, 1924, Oxford) British idealist philosopher. Influenced by G.W.F. Hegel, he considered mind to be more fundamental than matter. In Ethical Studies (1876), he sought to expose confusions in utilitarianism. In The Principles of Logic (1883), he denounced the psychology of the empiricists. His most ambitious work, Appearance and Reality (1893), maintained that, though reality is spiritual, the thesis cannot be demonstrated because of the fatally abstract nature of human thought. Instead of ideas, which could not properly contain reality, he recommended feeling, the immediacy of which could embrace the harmonious nature of reality. He was the first English philosopher to be awarded the Order of Merit. His brother was the eminent poetry critic A.C. Bradley (1851–1935).

Learn more about Bradley, F(rancis) H(erbert) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

in full William Warren Bradley

(born July 28, 1943, Crystal City, Mo., U.S.) U.S. basketball player and politician. Bradley attended Princeton University (1961–65), where, as a playmaker and high-scoring forward 6 ft 5 in. (196 cm) tall, he was named College Player of the Year in 1964–65. In a semifinal game he scored 58 points, an NCAA tournament record. In 1964 he helped the U.S. team win the Olympic gold medal. He studied at the University of Oxford as a Rhodes scholar, then returned to play with the New York Knicks until 1977, helping them win two NBA championships (1970, 1973). As a prominent U.S. senator from New Jersey (1979–97), he sought to raise public awareness of race relations and poverty and was a critic of campaign-financing practices. In 1999–2000 he was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Learn more about Bradley, Bill with a free trial on Britannica.com.

in full William Warren Bradley

(born July 28, 1943, Crystal City, Mo., U.S.) U.S. basketball player and politician. Bradley attended Princeton University (1961–65), where, as a playmaker and high-scoring forward 6 ft 5 in. (196 cm) tall, he was named College Player of the Year in 1964–65. In a semifinal game he scored 58 points, an NCAA tournament record. In 1964 he helped the U.S. team win the Olympic gold medal. He studied at the University of Oxford as a Rhodes scholar, then returned to play with the New York Knicks until 1977, helping them win two NBA championships (1970, 1973). As a prominent U.S. senator from New Jersey (1979–97), he sought to raise public awareness of race relations and poverty and was a critic of campaign-financing practices. In 1999–2000 he was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Learn more about Bradley, Bill with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Bradley is a city in Lafayette County, Arkansas, United States. The population was 563 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Bradley is located at (33.098580, -93.657434).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.9 square miles (2.4 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 563 people, 223 households, and 134 families residing in the city. The population density was 614.8 people per square mile (236.3/km²). There were 285 housing units at an average density of 311.2/sq mi (119.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 46.36% White, 52.40% Black or African American, 0.36% Asian, and 0.89% from two or more races. 0.71% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 223 households out of which 30.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.7% were married couples living together, 22.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.9% were non-families. 37.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 20.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.38.

In the city the population was spread out with 33.6% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 23.1% from 25 to 44, 17.9% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 80.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 70.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $14,375, and the median income for a family was $19,306. Males had a median income of $21,719 versus $14,688 for females. The per capita income for the city was $2,455. About 43.9% of families and 49.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 66.5% of those under age 18 and 42.2% of those age 65 or over.

References

External links

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