Bloomfield

Bloomfield

[bloom-feeld]
Bloomfield, Leonard, 1887-1949, American linguist, b. Chicago. Bloomfield was professor at Ohio State Univ. (1921-27), at the Univ. of Chicago (1927-40), and at Yale (from 1940). His specialty for years was Germanic languages, especially in their comparative aspects. He became interested, however, in languages from a scientific, descriptive viewpoint. His masterpiece Language (1933) is a standard text. It had a profound influence on linguistics, for it was a clear statement of principles that became axiomatic, notably that language study must always be centered in the spoken language, as against documents; that the definitions used in grammar should be based on the forms of the language, not on the meanings of the forms; and that a given language at a given time is a complete system of sounds and forms that exist independently of the past—so that the history of a form does not explain its actual meaning. His other works include Tagalog Texts with Grammatical Analysis (1917), Linguistic Aspects of Science (1939), Spoken Dutch (1945), and Spoken Russian (1945).

See R. A. Hall, Leonard Bloomfield: Essays on His Life and Work (1987).

Bloomfield. 1 Town (1990 pop. 19,483), Hartford co., N Conn., a suburb of Hartford, in a tobacco and dairy region; settled c.1642, inc. 1835. Helicopter parts are made there. 2 City (1990 pop. 45,061), Essex co., NE N.J., an industrial and residential suburb of Newark; settled as part of Newark c.1660, inc. as a town 1812, as a city 1900. Electrical equipment, adhesives, rubber products, and semiconductor gaskets are made in the city, which is also home to Bloomfield College. Named for the Revolutionary War general Joseph Bloomfield, who later became governor of New Jersey, it had been a supply point for both sides during the war. In the 19th cent. it was a trade and transportation hub.

(born April 1, 1887, Chicago, Ill., U.S.—died April 18, 1949, New Haven, Conn.) U.S. linguist. He began his career as a philologist trained in Indo-European, especially Germanic languages. He taught Germanic philology at the University of Chicago (1927–40) and linguistics at Yale (1940–49). In Language (1933), one of the clearest 20th-century presentations of linguistics, he advocated the study of linguistic phenomena in isolation from their nonlinguistic environment and emphasized the need for empirical description. His thinking was influenced by his work on non-Indo-European languages, particularly the Algonquian family; The Menomini Language (1962) is a paragon of linguistic description and American Indian linguistic scholarship.

Learn more about Bloomfield, Leonard with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born April 1, 1887, Chicago, Ill., U.S.—died April 18, 1949, New Haven, Conn.) U.S. linguist. He began his career as a philologist trained in Indo-European, especially Germanic languages. He taught Germanic philology at the University of Chicago (1927–40) and linguistics at Yale (1940–49). In Language (1933), one of the clearest 20th-century presentations of linguistics, he advocated the study of linguistic phenomena in isolation from their nonlinguistic environment and emphasized the need for empirical description. His thinking was influenced by his work on non-Indo-European languages, particularly the Algonquian family; The Menomini Language (1962) is a paragon of linguistic description and American Indian linguistic scholarship.

Learn more about Bloomfield, Leonard with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Bloomfield may refer to:

Places

Australia

People

See also

Search another word or see bloomfieldon Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature