Definitions

assembly person

Districts in California

There are several different types of districts in California. The U.S. state of California is geographically divided into various districts for political and administrative purposes.

Congressional Districts

California is divided into 53 Congressional districts.

Each district elects a representative to serve in the United States House of Representatives as part of the California's congressional delegation.

California's current districts have been in place since 2003.

State Senate Districts

California is divided into 40 State Senate Districts, each of which elects a member to the California State Legislature. Twice the size of an Assembly district, each State Senator represents about 840,000 people. | Maps of California Senatorial Districts. The members of the California Senate Republican caucus is given at" | California Senate Republicans. The combined Senate membership is given at | California Senate database.

Prior to 1968, state senate districts were restricted such that one county could only hold at most one seat. This led to the situation of Los Angeles County, with 6 million residents as of 1968, receiving 600 times less representation than residents of Alpine County and Calaveras County, some of California's least populous counties. The Reynolds v. Sims decision by the United States Supreme Court compelled all states to draw up districts that were apportioned by population rather than geography. As such, boundaries were changed such that equal representation was provided.

State Assembly Districts

California is divided into 80 Assembly districts with each Assembly person representing approximately 400,000 residents. California Assembly district maps As a result of agreements in apportionment most of these Assembly districts are "gerrymandered" to be either a safe Democrat or a safe Republican district with only very few (1-2) districts in "real" competition in each two year election cycle. There has been talk, but not much action, on changing the way that election districts are chosen by taking the choices away from the California Legislature. Each Assembly member is limited to three terms by a referendum passed by California voters. In 2008, Proposition 93 unsuccessfully attempted to change term limits to a maximum of twelve years or six terms instead of three.

The California Assembly Democratic Caucus members are given at: Democratic Caucus The California Assembly Republican Caucus members are given at: Republican Caucus

California Appellate Court Districts

The California Court of Appeal is divided into six appellate districts, based on geography. Some of the appellate districts are further divided into Divisions.

First District

The California Court of Appeal for the First District is located in San Francisco. Its jurisdiction is over the following counties: Alameda, Contra Costa, Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Solano, and Sonoma. It is divided into five non-geographical divisions with four justices each.

Second District

The California Court of Appeal for the Second District has its main courthouse in Los Angeles and the secondary courthouse, hosting Division Six, in Ventura. Division Six handles appeals from San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and Ventura Counties, while Divisions One through Five, Seven, and Eight handle appeals from Los Angeles County. Each division has four justices.

Third District

The California Court of Appeal for the Third District is located in Sacramento. Its jurisdiction is over the following counties: Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Lassen, Modoc, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Sutter, Tehama, Trinity, Yolo, and Yuba. It has 11 justices and is not divided into divisions.

Fourth District

The California Court of Appeal for the Fourth District is unique in that it is divided into three geographical divisions that are administratively separate, which even have different case number systems, and yet remain referred to as a single district.

Division One

The Division One courthouse is located in San Diego. It handles appeals from Imperial and San Diego Counties. It has 10 justices.

Division Two

The Division Two courthouse is located in Riverside. It handles appeals from Inyo, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties. It has seven justices. It is the only California appellate court that issues a tentative opinion before oral argument.

Division Three

The Division Three courthouse is located in Santa Ana. It handles appeals from Orange County. It has eight justices.

Fifth District

The California Court of Appeal for the Fifth District is located in Fresno. Its jurisdiction covers the following counties: Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Stanislaus, Tulare, and Tuolumne. It has nine justices.

Sixth District

The California Court of Appeal for the Sixth District is located in San José. Its jurisdiction covers San Benito, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties. It has seven justices.

Board of Equalization Districts

California's Board of Equalization is a public agency charged with tax administration and fee collection. For the purposes of tax administration, the Board of Equalization divides the state into four Equalization Districts, each with its own elected board member.

First District

The first Equalization District is made up of the following counties: Alameda, Colusa, Contra Costa, Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Monterey, Napa, San Benito, San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Sonoma, Trinity, Yolo, and a portion of Santa Barbara.

Second District

The second Equalization District is made up of the following counties: Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Lassen, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Modoc, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Tuolumne, Ventura, Yuba, a portion of Los Angeles, a portion of San Bernardino, and a portion of Santa Barbara.

Third District

The third Equalization District is made up of the following counties: Imperial, Orange, Riverside, San Diego, a portion of Los Angeles, and a portion of San Bernardino.

Fourth District

The fourth Equalization District is made up of 73 of the 88 cities in Los Angeles County: Agoura Hills, Alhambra, Arcadia, Artesia, Avalon, Baldwin Park, Bell, Bell Gardens, Bellflower, Beverly Hills, Burbank, Calabasas, Carson, Cerritos, City of Industry, Commerce, Compton, Covina, Cudahy, Culver City, Diamond Bar, Downey, El Monte, El Segundo, Gardena, Glendale, Glendora, Hawaiian Gardens, Hawthorne, Hermosa Beach, Hidden Hills, Huntington Park, Inglewood, La Cañada Flintridge, La Habra Heights, La Mirada, La Puente, Lakewood, Lawndale, Lomita, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Lynwood, Malibu, Manhattan Beach, Maywood, Monrovia, Montebello, Monterey Park, Norwalk, Paramount, Pasadena, Pico Rivera, Redondo Beach, Rosemead, San Fernando, San Gabriel, San Marino, Santa Fe Springs, Santa Monica, Sierra Madre, Signal Hill, South El Monte, South Gate, South Pasadena, Temple City, Torrance, Vernon, Walnut, West Covina, West Hollywood, Westlake Village, and Whittier.

References

See also

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