Arlington

Arlington

[ahr-ling-tuhn]
Arlington, Henry Bennet, 1st earl of, 1618-85, English statesman. He fought for the royalists in the English civil war and, after going into exile, served as an envoy in Spain for the future Charles II. After the Restoration, Charles made him a secretary of state (1662), and he became one of the king's closest advisers, a member of the Cabal. He knew of the king's secret agreement with Louis XIV in the Treaty of Dover (1670) and seems to have encouraged Charles in promulgating the Declaration of Indulgence (1672) and in instigating the third Dutch War. He was made earl of Arlington in 1672. Impeached (1674) for corruption, betrayal of trust, and pro-Catholic activities, he was acquitted, resigned, and became lord chamberlain (1674).
Arlington, county (1990 pop. 170,936), N Va., across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. Arlington is a residential and commercial suburb of Washington. Within its boundaries are Arlington National Cemetery; Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial; the Pentagon; the U.S. Marine Corps and Air Force memorials; Marymount Univ.; a campus of George Mason Univ.; Ronald Reagan National Airport; and Crystal City, a large multiuse development near the Potamac. Arlington has many federal facilities and major office developments as well as some industry, including printing and publishing, shipbuilding, and light manufacturing; defense contractors, information technology firms, and government research offices are clustered there. Originally Alexandria Co., Arlington was ceded to the federal government by Virginia in 1789 and was part of the District of Columbia until 1846, when it was returned to Virginia. In 1920 its name was changed to Arlington, after Arlington House, Robert E. Lee's home.
Arlington. 1 Town (1990 pop. 44,630), Middlesex co., E Mass., a residential suburb of Boston; settled c.1630 as Menotomy, inc. as West Cambridge 1807, renamed Arlington 1867. The area was the scene of fierce fighting after the battles of Lexington and Concord in 1775. Some 17th-century buildings remain.

2 Industrial city (1990 pop. 261,721), Tarrant co., N Tex., largest of the "Mid-Cities" between Dallas and Fort Worth; inc. 1896. Arlington had a population increase of over 64% between 1980 and 1990 and remains a fast growing city. It produces motor vehicles and parts; transportation, medical, electronic, and oil-field equipment; and rubber and plastic products. Six Flags over Texas, a huge theme park, is there, and the city is home to the Texas Rangers baseball team and Dallas Cowboys football team. It is also the seat of the Univ. of Texas at Arlington.

3 City, N Va., coextensive with Arlington co.

(born Dec. 22, 1869, Head Tide, Maine, U.S.—died April 6, 1935, New York, N.Y.) U.S. poet. He attended Harvard briefly, then he endured years of poverty and obscurity before his poetry began to attract attention. He is best known for short dramatic lyrics about the lives (mostly tragic) of the people in a small New England village; these include “Richard Cory” and “Miniver Cheevy.” Among his collections are The Children of the Night (1897), The Man Against the Sky (1916), and Collected Poems (1921, Pulitzer Prize). He also wrote long narrative poems, including Merlin (1917), Lancelot (1920), The Man Who Died Twice (1924, Pulitzer Prize), Tristram (1927, Pulitzer Prize), and Amaranth (1934).

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(born Dec. 22, 1869, Head Tide, Maine, U.S.—died April 6, 1935, New York, N.Y.) U.S. poet. He attended Harvard briefly, then he endured years of poverty and obscurity before his poetry began to attract attention. He is best known for short dramatic lyrics about the lives (mostly tragic) of the people in a small New England village; these include “Richard Cory” and “Miniver Cheevy.” Among his collections are The Children of the Night (1897), The Man Against the Sky (1916), and Collected Poems (1921, Pulitzer Prize). He also wrote long narrative poems, including Merlin (1917), Lancelot (1920), The Man Who Died Twice (1924, Pulitzer Prize), Tristram (1927, Pulitzer Prize), and Amaranth (1934).

Learn more about Robinson, Edwin Arlington with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Unincorporated settlement (pop., 2000: 189,453), northern Virginia, U.S. Lying across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C., it is the capital of Arlington county, which was part of Washington, D.C., from 1801 to 1847, when it was returned to Virginia. It is the site of Arlington National Cemetery (located on the former estate of Robert E. Lee), Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, and numerous federal buildings, including the Pentagon.

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