Agamede

Agamede

[ag-uh-mee-dee]
Agamede (Greek: Ἀγαμήδη) was a name attributed to two separate women in classical Greek mythology and history:

  • Agamede (c. 12th century BC) was, according to Homer, a Greek physician acquainted with the heal­ing powers of all the plants that grow upon the earth. She was born in Elis, the eldest daughter of Augeas, King of the Epeans, and was married to Mulius, the first man killed in battle by Nestor during a war between Elis and Pylos. Hyginus makes her the mother of Belus, Actor, and Dictys, by Poseidon. She was called Perimede by both Propertius and Theocritus. By the Hellenistic period (c. 4th to 1st centuries BC), Agamede had become a sorceress-figure, much like Circe or Medea.
  • Agamede was a daughter of Macaria, from whom Agamede, a place in Lesbos, was believed to have derived its name. The town had already disappeared in Pliny's day.

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