Definitions

Adrienne

Adrienne

[ey-dree-en, -uhn; Fr. a-dree-en]
Lecouvreur, Adrienne, 1692-1730, French actress. With Michel Baron she helped change the traditional acting techniques of the French stage to a simpler, more natural style. She was extremely popular from her debut at the Comédie Française in 1717. Her love for Maurice de Saxe ended in tragedy; her mysterious death was ascribed to poisoning by her rival, the duchesse de Bouillon. The Church's refusal to grant Lecouvreur a Christian burial resulted in a bitter poem by her friend Voltaire. She is the subject of a play by Scribe and Legouvé and of the opera Adriana Lecouvreur by Francesco Cilea.

See biography by J. Richtman (1971).

Rich, Adrienne, 1929-, American poet, b. Baltimore, grad. Radcliffe, 1951. Since the 1970s her volumes of exquisitely wrought verse have increasingly reflected feminist and lesbian themes. Among her volumes of poetry are A Change of World (1951), Diving into the Wreck (1973), The Dream of a Common Language (1978), A Wild Patience Has Taken Me This Far (1981), Your Native Land, Your Life (1986), Time's Power (1989), and Dark Fields of the Republic (1996). Her influential volumes of feminist theory and criticism include Of Women Born (1976), On Lies, Secrets, and Silence (1979), and Blood, Bread, and Poetry (1986). Her prose reflections on the function of poetry are contained in What Is Found There: Notebooks on Poetry and Politics (1993).

See her Collected Early Poems: 1950-1970 (1993); study by C. Keyes (1986).

(born May 16, 1929, Baltimore, Md., U.S.) U.S. poet, scholar, and critic. She was a student at Radcliffe College when her poems were chosen for publication in the Yale Younger Poets series; the resulting volume, A Change of World (1951), reflected her formal mastery. Her subsequent work traces a transformation from well-crafted but imitative poetry to a highly personal and powerful style. Her increasing commitment to the women's movement and a lesbian/feminist aesthetic influenced much of her work. Among her collections are Diving into the Wreck (1973, National Book Award) and The Dream of a Common Language (1978). She also wrote compelling books of nonfiction, including Of Woman Born (1976; National Book Award), On Lies, Secrets, and Silence (1979), and What Is Found There (1993).

Learn more about Rich, Adrienne (Cecile) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born May 16, 1929, Baltimore, Md., U.S.) U.S. poet, scholar, and critic. She was a student at Radcliffe College when her poems were chosen for publication in the Yale Younger Poets series; the resulting volume, A Change of World (1951), reflected her formal mastery. Her subsequent work traces a transformation from well-crafted but imitative poetry to a highly personal and powerful style. Her increasing commitment to the women's movement and a lesbian/feminist aesthetic influenced much of her work. Among her collections are Diving into the Wreck (1973, National Book Award) and The Dream of a Common Language (1978). She also wrote compelling books of nonfiction, including Of Woman Born (1976; National Book Award), On Lies, Secrets, and Silence (1979), and What Is Found There (1993).

Learn more about Rich, Adrienne (Cecile) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Adrienne is the French feminine form of the male name Adrien.

List of people named Adrienne

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