Definitions

Academy

Academy

[uh-kad-uh-mee]
Academy, school founded by Plato near Athens c.387 B.C. It took its name from the garden (named for the hero Academus) in which it was located. Plato's followers met there for nine centuries until, along with other pagan schools, it was closed by Emperor Justinian in A.D. 529. The Academy has come to mean the entire school of Platonic philosophy, covering the period from Plato through Neoplatonism under Proclus. During this period Platonic philosophy was modified in various ways. These have been frequently divided into three phases: the Old Academy (until c.250 B.C.) of Plato, Speusippus, and Xenocrates; the Middle Academy (until c.150 B.C.) of Arcesilaus and Carneades, who introduced and maintained skepticism as being more faithful to Plato and Socrates; and the New Academy (c.110 B.C.) of Philo of Larissa, who, with subsequent leaders, returned to the dogmatism of the Old Academy.

Society of learned individuals organized to advance art, science, literature, music, or some other cultural or intellectual area of endeavour. The word comes from the name of an olive grove outside ancient Athens, the site of Plato's famous school of philosophy in the 4th century BC. Academies appeared in Italy in the 15th century and reached their greatest influence in the 17th–18th centuries. Their purpose generally was to provide training and, when applicable, to create exhibiting or performance opportunities for their members or students. Most European countries now have at least one academy sponsored by or otherwise connected with the state. Seealso Académie Française.

Learn more about academy with a free trial on Britannica.com.

known as Annapolis

Institution for the training of commissioned officers for the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps. It was founded at Annapolis, Md., in 1845 and reorganized in 1850–51. Women were first admitted in 1976. Graduates are awarded the degree of bachelor of science and a commission as ensign in the Navy or as second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. Annapolis has produced many notable Americans, including George Dewey, Richard E. Byrd, Chester Nimitz, William F. Halsey, Jr., A.A. Michelson, Hyman Rickover, Jimmy Carter, Ross Perot, and several astronauts.

Learn more about United States Naval Academy with a free trial on Britannica.com.

known as West Point

Institution for the training of commissioned officers for the U.S. Army. Founded in 1802 at the fort at West Point, N.Y., it is one of the oldest service academies in the world. It was established as an apprentice school for military engineers and was, in effect, the first U.S. school of engineering. It was reorganized in 1812, and in 1866 its educational program was expanded considerably. Women were first admitted in 1976. The four-year course of college-level education and training leads to a bachelor of science degree and a commission as second lieutenant in the Army. West Point has trained such leaders as Ulysses S. Grant, William T. Sherman, Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, Jefferson Davis, John Pershing, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, Omar Bradley, and George Patton.

Learn more about United States Military Academy with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Institution for the training of commissioned officers for the U.S. Air Force, located in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Created by an act of Congress in 1954, it opened in 1955. Graduates receive a bachelor's degree and a second lieutenant's commission. Most physically qualified graduates go on to Air Force pilot-training schools. Candidates may come from the ranks of the U.S. Army or Air Force, may be children of deceased veterans of the armed forces, or may be nominated by U.S. senators or representatives or by the president or vice president. All applicants must take a competitive entrance examination.

Learn more about United States Air Force Academy with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Britain's national academy of art. It was founded in 1768 by George III. Its first president (1768–92) was Joshua Reynolds. The number of its members, who are selected by members and associates, is fixed at 40; members' names are frequently followed by the initials R.A. (“Royal Academician”). Its galleries contain works by such former members as Thomas Gainsborough and J.M.W. Turner. The academy opened a new wing, the Sackler Galleries, in 1991.

Learn more about Royal Academy of Arts with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Little River-Academy is a city in Bell County, Texas, United States. The population was 1,645 at the 2000 census. It is part of the KilleenTempleFort Hood Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography

Little River-Academy is located at (30.985136, -97.355089). It is situated on the Little River and it is at the intersection of State Highway 95 and Farm Road 436. It is ten miles south of Temple, TX.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.7 square miles (7.1 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,645 people, 584 households, and 439 families residing in the city. The population density was 599.3 people per square mile (231.8/km²). There were 618 housing units at an average density of 225.1/sq mi (87.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 88.75% White, 0.36% African American, 0.36% Native American, 0.55% Asian, 6.81% from other races, and 3.16% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.22% of the population.

There were 584 households out of which 43.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.9% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.7% were non-families. 20.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.29.

In the city the population was spread out with 32.2% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 17.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $39,063, and the median income for a family was $45,625. Males had a median income of $32,500 versus $21,081 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,236. About 6.2% of families and 9.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.5% of those under age 18 and 17.5% of those age 65 or over.

History

There was a fort here, built in 1836, named Fort Griffin. Because of fights with Native Americans, white people settled near the fort. The railroad came to town in 1880, and the post office in 1886. By 1914, there were 250 inhabitants. The towns of Little River and Academy merged in 1980 to form Little River-Academy.

Education

Little River-Academy is served by the Academy Independent School District.

AISD has three schools: Academy Elementary School, Academy Middle School, and Academy High School.

References

External links

Search another word or see academyon Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;