Willard

Willard

[wil-erd]
Willard, Emma, 1787-1870, American educator, pioneer in woman's education, b. Emma Hart in Berlin, Conn. She attended and later taught in the local academy and in 1807 took charge of the Female Academy at Middlebury, Vt. Two years later she married Dr. John Willard. In 1814 she opened a school in her home, where she taught subjects not then available to women. In 1818 she addressed to the New York legislature an appeal for support of her plan for improving female education, and Governor Clinton invited her to move to New York state. Her school was opened (1819) at Waterford but promised financial support was not forthcoming, and in 1821 the Troy Female Seminary was founded under her leadership. Troy became famous, offering collegiate education to women and new opportunity to women teachers. She wrote a number of textbooks, a journal of her trip abroad in 1830, and a volume of poems, including "Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep." In 1838 Willard retired from active management of the school, which was later renamed in her honor. She devoted the remainder of her life to the improvement of common schools and to the cause of woman's education.

See A. Lutz, Emma Willard, Daughter of Democracy (1929) and Emma Willard, Pioneer Educator of American Women (1964).

Willard, Frances Elizabeth, 1839-98, American temperance leader and reformer, b. Churchville, N.Y., grad. Northwestern Female College, 1859. She was president of Evanston College for Ladies and dean of women at Northwestern Univ. After leaving the university, she helped organize (1874) the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and in 1879 became its president. She devoted most of her life to the organization of women for the prohibition of alcoholic beverages but was active in other causes, especially that of woman suffrage.

See her autobiography, Glimpses of Fifty Years (1889); biographies by M. Earhart (1944) and M. L. Gates (1964).

Willard, Solomon, 1783-1861, American architect and sculptor, b. Petersham, Mass. Arriving in Boston in 1804, he eventually became a leading architect; he both designed and supervised the erection of the Bunker Hill monument. He carved the architectural detail of many Boston buildings, as well as ships' figureheads, including the figure for the frigate Washington (U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.). He taught drawing and sculpture in Boston, where Horatio Greenough was one of his pupils.

(born Dec. 17, 1908, Grand Valley, Colo., U.S.—died Sept. 8, 1980, Los Angeles, Calif.) U.S. chemist. He studied at the University of California at Berkeley and later taught there and at the University of Chicago and UCLA. With the Manhattan Project, he helped develop a method for separating uranium isotopes and showed that tritium is a product of cosmic radiation. In 1947 he and his students developed carbon-14 dating, which proved to be an extremely valuable tool for archaeology, anthropology, and earth science and earned him a 1960 Nobel Prize.

Learn more about Libby, Willard (Frank) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Dec. 17, 1908, Grand Valley, Colo., U.S.—died Sept. 8, 1980, Los Angeles, Calif.) U.S. chemist. He studied at the University of California at Berkeley and later taught there and at the University of Chicago and UCLA. With the Manhattan Project, he helped develop a method for separating uranium isotopes and showed that tritium is a product of cosmic radiation. In 1947 he and his students developed carbon-14 dating, which proved to be an extremely valuable tool for archaeology, anthropology, and earth science and earned him a 1960 Nobel Prize.

Learn more about Libby, Willard (Frank) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born , Feb. 11, 1839, New Haven, Conn., U.S.—died April 28, 1903, New Haven) U.S. theoretical physicist and chemist. He became the first person to earn an engineering doctorate from Yale University, where he taught from 1871 until his death. He began his career in engineering but turned to theory, analyzing the equilibrium of James Watt's steam-engine governor. His major works were on fluid thermodynamics and the equilibrium of heterogeneous substances, and he developed statistical mechanics. Gibbs was the first to expound with mathematical rigour the “relation between chemical, electrical, and thermal energy and capacity for work.” Though little of his work was appreciated during his lifetime, his application of thermodynamic theory to chemical reactions converted much of physical chemistry from an empirical to a deductive science, and he is regarded as one of the greatest U.S. scientists of the 19th century.

Learn more about Gibbs, J(osiah) Willard with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Nov. 11, 1897, Montezuma, Ind., U.S.—died Oct. 9, 1967, Cambridge, Mass.) U.S. psychologist. He taught at Harvard University (1930–67), becoming noted for his theory of personality, which focused on the adult self rather than on childhood or infantile emotions and experiences, set forth in books such as Personality (1937). In The Nature of Prejudice (1954) he made important contributions to the analysis of prejudice.

Learn more about Allport, Gordon W(illard) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born , Feb. 11, 1839, New Haven, Conn., U.S.—died April 28, 1903, New Haven) U.S. theoretical physicist and chemist. He became the first person to earn an engineering doctorate from Yale University, where he taught from 1871 until his death. He began his career in engineering but turned to theory, analyzing the equilibrium of James Watt's steam-engine governor. His major works were on fluid thermodynamics and the equilibrium of heterogeneous substances, and he developed statistical mechanics. Gibbs was the first to expound with mathematical rigour the “relation between chemical, electrical, and thermal energy and capacity for work.” Though little of his work was appreciated during his lifetime, his application of thermodynamic theory to chemical reactions converted much of physical chemistry from an empirical to a deductive science, and he is regarded as one of the greatest U.S. scientists of the 19th century.

Learn more about Gibbs, J(osiah) Willard with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Willard is a city in Greene County, Missouri, United States. The population was 3,193 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Springfield, Missouri Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Willard's main east-west road, U.S. 160, is known as "Olympian Boulevard because two grduates of Willard High School have participated in the Olympics (See "Famous Residents" below.)

Geography

Willard is located at (37.294429, -93.423218).

According to Buster M. ,the city has a total area of 5.6 square miles (14.4 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 3,193 people, 1,154 households, and 909 families residing in the city. The population density was 575.2 people per square mile (222.1/km²). There were 1,226 housing units at an average density of 220.9/sq mi (85.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.75% White, 0.16% African American, 0.66% Native American, 0.09% Asian, 0.22% from other races, and 1.13% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.53% of the population.

There were 1,154 households out of which 45.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.8% were married couples living together, 11.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.2% were non-families. 18.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the city the population was spread out with 32.5% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 33.0% from 25 to 44, 17.0% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 89.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $39,565, and the median income for a family was $43,646. Males had a median income of $29,420 versus $20,370 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,253. About 9.3% of families and 9.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.6% of those under age 18 and 12.6% of those age 65 or over.

Famous Residents

The infamous Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow stayed briefly at the Willard Hotel during their crime-riddled run in which they kidnapped a Missouri police officer.

References

External links

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