Waterloo

Waterloo

[waw-ter-loo, wot-er-, waw-ter-loo, wot-er-; for 1 also Flem. vah-tuhr-loh]
Waterloo, commune (1991 pop. 27,860), Walloon Brabant prov., central Belgium, near Brussels. The battle of Waterloo (see Waterloo campaign) was fought just south of there on June 18, 1815. The battle is commemorated by a large monument (built 1823-27).
Waterloo. 1 City (1991 pop. 71,181), SE Ont., Canada. It adjoins Kitchener. Several large insurance companies have their main offices there. Its industries include distilleries and plants making furniture, farm machinery, and metal products. The district was settled (1800-1805) by Mennonites from Pennsylvania. The Univ. of Waterloo and Wilfrid Laurier Univ. are there. 2 Town (1991 pop. 3,964), S Que., Canada, SE of Montreal. It is the center of a farming region known for its mushrooms. Manufactures include plastics, wire goods, and baby carriages.
Waterloo, city (1990 pop. 66,467), seat of Black Hawk co., NE Iowa, on the Cedar River; inc. 1868. Originally a center for sawmills and flour mills, Waterloo is a trade and industrial center in a farm and livestock area. The city's chief industries are meatpacking, soybean processing, and the manufacture of farm machinery, plastics, fabricated metal products, transportation equipment, and apparel. The National Dairy Cattle Congress is held there each September. A 10-acre (4-hectare) replica of the island where the protagonist of Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe was shipwrecked has been built in the Cedar River at Waterloo.
Waterloo, University of, at Waterloo, Ont., Canada; nondenominational; founded 1957. It has faculties of arts, science, engineering, environmental studies, applied health sciences, mathematics, and graduate studies as well as schools of architecture, optometry, recreation and leisure studies, and urban and regional planning.

(born Nov. 3, 1793, Austinville, Va., U.S.—died Dec. 27, 1836, Austin, Texas) U.S. founder of the first legal colony of English-speaking people in Texas when it was still part of Mexico. He was raised in the Missouri Territory and served in its legislature (1814–19). The economic panic in 1819 led his father to conceive a plan to colonize Texas on land obtained from the Mexican government. Austin continued the project after his father died (1821) and founded a colony of several hundred families on the Brazos River in 1822. He maintained good relations with the Mexican government. He tried to induce the Mexican government to make Texas a separate state in the Mexican confederation; when this attempt failed, he recommended in 1833 the organization of a state without waiting for the consent of the Mexican congress, and he was imprisoned. Released in 1835, he traveled to the U.S. to secure help when the Texas revolution broke out in October of that year. He is considered one of the state's founders. The city of Austin is named for him.

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(born March 28, 1911, Lancaster, Lancashire, Eng.—died Feb. 8, 1960, Oxford) British philosopher. He taught at Oxford from 1945 until his death. He was a leading member of the “ordinary language,” or “Oxford,” movement of analytic philosophy, which was characterized by its belief that philosophical problems frequently arise through inattention to or misunderstandings of ordinary uses of language; accordingly, such problems can be resolved through consideration of the ordinary uses of the terms by which the relevant philosophical concepts are expressed. Ordinary-language analyses by Austin and his followers frequently took the form of asking “what one would say” in various concrete situations. Austin was also the inventor of speech act theory, through which he attempted to account for the various “performative” aspects of conveyed linguistic meaning. Several of his essays and lectures were published posthumously in Philosophical Papers (1961), Sense and Sensibilia (1962), and How to Do Things with Words (1962). Seealso analytic philosophy.

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(born March 3, 1790, Creeting Mill, Suffolk, Eng.—died Dec. 1859, Weybridge, Surrey) British jurist. Although initially unsuccessful in his law practice (1818–25), his analytical mind and intellectual honesty impressed colleagues, and he was named the first professor of jurisprudence at University College, London (1826). Distinguished men attended his lectures, but he failed to attract students, and he resigned his chair in 1832. His writings, especially The Province of Jurisprudence Determined (1832), sought to distinguish law from morality. He also helped to define jurisprudence as the analysis of fundamental legal concepts, as distinct from the criticism of legal institutions, which he called the “science of legislation.” His work, largely unrecognized in his lifetime, influenced later jurists, including Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

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(born Nov. 27, 1874, near Knightstown, Ind., U.S.—died Sept. 1, 1948, New Haven, Conn.) U.S. historian. Beard taught at Columbia University (1904–17) and cofounded New York's New School for Social Research (1919). He is best known for iconoclastic studies of the development of U.S. political institutions, emphasizing the dynamics of socioeconomic conflict and change and analyzing motivational factors in the founding of institutions. His works include An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United States (1913), claiming that the Constitution was formulated to serve the economic interests of the founders; The Economic Origins of Jeffersonian Democracy (1915); and, with his wife, Mary R. Beard (1876–1958), The Rise of American Civilization (1927).

Learn more about Beard, Charles A(ustin) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Nov. 3, 1793, Austinville, Va., U.S.—died Dec. 27, 1836, Austin, Texas) U.S. founder of the first legal colony of English-speaking people in Texas when it was still part of Mexico. He was raised in the Missouri Territory and served in its legislature (1814–19). The economic panic in 1819 led his father to conceive a plan to colonize Texas on land obtained from the Mexican government. Austin continued the project after his father died (1821) and founded a colony of several hundred families on the Brazos River in 1822. He maintained good relations with the Mexican government. He tried to induce the Mexican government to make Texas a separate state in the Mexican confederation; when this attempt failed, he recommended in 1833 the organization of a state without waiting for the consent of the Mexican congress, and he was imprisoned. Released in 1835, he traveled to the U.S. to secure help when the Texas revolution broke out in October of that year. He is considered one of the state's founders. The city of Austin is named for him.

Learn more about Austin, Stephen (Fuller) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born March 3, 1790, Creeting Mill, Suffolk, Eng.—died Dec. 1859, Weybridge, Surrey) British jurist. Although initially unsuccessful in his law practice (1818–25), his analytical mind and intellectual honesty impressed colleagues, and he was named the first professor of jurisprudence at University College, London (1826). Distinguished men attended his lectures, but he failed to attract students, and he resigned his chair in 1832. His writings, especially The Province of Jurisprudence Determined (1832), sought to distinguish law from morality. He also helped to define jurisprudence as the analysis of fundamental legal concepts, as distinct from the criticism of legal institutions, which he called the “science of legislation.” His work, largely unrecognized in his lifetime, influenced later jurists, including Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

Learn more about Austin, John with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born March 28, 1911, Lancaster, Lancashire, Eng.—died Feb. 8, 1960, Oxford) British philosopher. He taught at Oxford from 1945 until his death. He was a leading member of the “ordinary language,” or “Oxford,” movement of analytic philosophy, which was characterized by its belief that philosophical problems frequently arise through inattention to or misunderstandings of ordinary uses of language; accordingly, such problems can be resolved through consideration of the ordinary uses of the terms by which the relevant philosophical concepts are expressed. Ordinary-language analyses by Austin and his followers frequently took the form of asking “what one would say” in various concrete situations. Austin was also the inventor of speech act theory, through which he attempted to account for the various “performative” aspects of conveyed linguistic meaning. Several of his essays and lectures were published posthumously in Philosophical Papers (1961), Sense and Sensibilia (1962), and How to Do Things with Words (1962). Seealso analytic philosophy.

Learn more about Austin, J(ohn) L(angshaw) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

City (pop., 2000: 656,600), capital of Texas, U.S. It was founded in 1835 as the village of Waterloo on the Colorado River in south-central Texas. In 1839 it was made capital of the Republic of Texas and renamed to honour Stephen Austin; when Texas became a state in 1845, Austin was its capital. As the home of the University of Texas, it has expanded as a research and development centre for defense, high-technology, and consumer industries. The Lyndon B. Johnson Library is on the university campus.

Learn more about Austin with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Many things bear the name Waterloo. They are almost all named directly or indirectly after the settlement of Waterloo, Belgium and the famous battle which was fought near there. Presently the largest cities with this name are Waterloo, Ontario, Canada and Waterloo, Iowa, U.S.

Battle

Places

In Australia

In Belgium

In Canada

In the UK

In Hong Kong

In the Netherlands

In New Zealand

In Scotland

In Sierra Leone

In the United States

Near Antarctica

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