Turin

Turin

[toor-in, tyoor-, too-rin, tyoo-]
Turin, Ital. Torino, city (1991 pop. 962,507), capital of Piedmont and of Turin prov., NW Italy, at the confluence of the Po and Dora Riparia rivers. It is a major transportation hub and Italy's most important industrial center. Manufactures include motor vehicles, tires, textiles, clothing, machinery, electronic equipment, leather goods, furniture, chemicals, and vermouth. It is an international fashion center.

Turin was founded by the pre-Roman Taurini. The most important Roman town of the W Po valley, Turin was later a Lombard duchy and then a Frankish county. In spite of the claims of the house of Savoy, it remained a free commune in the 12th and 13th cent. It passed c.1280 to the house of Savoy (see Savoy, house of). Occupied (1536-62) by the French, it was restored to the dukes of Savoy and became their capital. From 1720 to 1861 it was the capital of the kingdom of Sardinia. During the War of the Spanish Succession it suffered a long siege, which ended with the victory of Eugene of Savoy over the French. In 1798, Charles Emmanuel IV of Savoy was obliged by the French to abdicate and to abandon Turin, but Victor Emmanuel I returned in 1814, and the city became the center of Italian national aspirations. From 1861 to 1865 it was the capital of the new Italian kingdom.

Because of its industrial importance, Turin suffered heavy damage in World War II; most of the important buildings that remain date from the 17th-19th cent. Of note are the Palace of the Marquesses of Caraglio e Senantes (17th cent.); the Palazzo Madama (begun late 13th cent.); the baroque Venaria Reale, a restored (2008) 17th-century royal summer palace, which houses a fine collection of arms and armor; the Academy of Science, which contains the rich Egyptian Museum; and the Car Museum.

The Cathedral of San Giovanni (late 15th cent.) has a casket that contains the famous "Shroud of Turin," in which some believe Jesus was wrapped after death. Carbon-14 dating (1988) suggested that it is a medieval forgery, but the testing may have been done on a sample from a repaired area. Analysis of pollen grains and plant images on the shroud (1999) indicated a date prior to the 8th cent., and other tests have suggested the shroud is pre-Medieval. Research published in 2009, comparing a shroud known to date from Jerusalem in the early 1st cent. A.D., noted that the Turin shroud had a more complex weave and consisted of a single piece of cloth instead of separate pieces for the head and body.

On a hill overlooking the city is the basilica of Superga (1717-31), containing the tombs of many of the dukes of Savoy and kings of Sardinia. Turin has a university and a well-known polytechnic institute (1859).

Italian Torino

City (pop., 2001 prelim.: 857,433), Piedmont region, northwestern Italy. Located on the Po River, it was founded by the Taurini. It was partly destroyed by Hannibal in 218 BC. It was made a Roman military colony under Emperor Augustus. A part of the Lombard duchy in the 6th century AD, it became the seat of government under Charlemagne (742–814). It passed to the house of Savoy in 1046. The capital of the kingdom of Sardinia in 1720, Turin was occupied by the French during the Napoleonic Wars. The political and intellectual centre of the Risorgimento movement, it served as the first capital of united Italy (1861–65). During World War II Turin sustained heavy damage from Allied air raids but was rebuilt. It is the focus of Italy's automotive industry and an international fashion centre. The Shroud of Turin has been housed in the 15th-century cathedral there since the 16th century.

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Turin is a town in Coweta County, Georgia, United States. The population was 165 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Turin is located at (33.326798, -84.634064).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.2 square miles (3.2 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 165 people, 66 households, and 51 families residing in the town. The population density was 131.5 people per square mile (51.0/km²). There were 68 housing units at an average density of 54.2/sq mi (21.0/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 89.09% White and 10.91% African American. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.21% of the population.

There were 66 households out of which 24.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 22.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.7% were non-families. 21.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.86.

In the town the population was spread out with 18.8% under the age of 18, 13.3% from 18 to 24, 23.6% from 25 to 44, 23.6% from 45 to 64, and 20.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 85.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.1 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $50,000, and the median income for a family was $55,375. Males had a median income of $23,125 versus $21,771 for females. The per capita income for the town was $19,994. About 1.9% of families and 7.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.5% of those under the age of eighteen and 10.0% of those sixty five or over.

References

External links

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