tranquilizers

tranquilizers

[trang-kwuh-lahy-zer]

Tranquilizers are pharmaceuticals designed to treat anxiety, insomnia and some mental illnesses. These medications work by suppressing the central nervous system. Tranquilizers are commonly divided into two types: major tranquilizers, which are usually prescribed to people experiencing serious mental illness symptoms, like psychosis, and minor tranquilizers. These medications are also called anti-psychotics. Minor tranquilizers are prescribed to people with emotional issues, and are also known as anti-anxiety medication.

Patients taking tranquilizers must be monitored closely by a physician. Many of these drugs are addictive, especially if not taken as prescribed. Over time, people who abuse tranquilizers often need higher doses of the medication to achieve the same results, which can result in overdose. Patients should never abruptly stop taking tranquilizers. Because these medications slow down the central nervous system, sudden withdrawal can include seizures and other harmful effects.

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