Torres

Torres Strait

[tawr-iz, tor-]

Passage between the island of New Guinea and Australia's Cape York Peninsula. It connects the Coral Sea and the Arafura Sea. It was discovered in 1606 by Spanish navigator Luis Vaez de Torres. About 80 mi (130 km) wide, it has many reefs, shoals, and islands, including the Torres Strait Islands, and is treacherous to navigate.

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(born April 17, 1902, Mexico City, Mex.—died May 13, 1974, Mexico City) Mexican poet, novelist, educator, and statesman. He held various diplomatic and government posts, including minister of public education (1943–46) and foreign minister (1946–48). His verse, which early on revealed the influence of Modernismo, often returned to the themes of loneliness, a search for identity, and a longing for death. Cripta (1937) is considered to include his most important poems. His poetry was collected in Obra poética (1967). Of six novels published between 1927 and 1937, Sombras (1937) is considered his best. Afflicted by cancer, he took his own life.

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(born April 17, 1902, Mexico City, Mex.—died May 13, 1974, Mexico City) Mexican poet, novelist, educator, and statesman. He held various diplomatic and government posts, including minister of public education (1943–46) and foreign minister (1946–48). His verse, which early on revealed the influence of Modernismo, often returned to the themes of loneliness, a search for identity, and a longing for death. Cripta (1937) is considered to include his most important poems. His poetry was collected in Obra poética (1967). Of six novels published between 1927 and 1937, Sombras (1937) is considered his best. Afflicted by cancer, he took his own life.

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Felix Gonzalez-Torres (1957-1996) was a Cuban artist who grew up in Puerto Rico before moving to New York City. Gonzalez-Torres had his first one-man exhibition of his early text pieces in 1988 at the Rastovsky Gallery (560 Broadway) in Soho.

His work was the focus of several major museum solo exhibitions in his lifetime and after his death. Retrospectives of his work have been organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York (1995), the Sprengel Museum in Hannover, Germany (1997), and the Serpentine Gallery in London (2000).

Gonzalez-Torres was known for his quiet, minimal installations and sculptures. Using materials such as strings of lightbulbs, clocks, stacks of paper, or packaged hard candies, Felix Gonzalez-Torres's work is sometimes considered a reflection of his experience with AIDS. Many of Gonzalez-Torres's installations invite the viewer to take a piece of the work with them: a series of works allow viewers to take packaged candies from a pile in the corner of an exhibition space, while another series consists of stacks of ultrathin sheets of clear plastic or unlimited edition prints, also free for the viewer to take. These installations are replenished by the exhibitor as they diminish. The most pervasive reading of Gonzalez-Torres's work takes the processes his works undergo (lightbulbs expiring, piles of candies dispersing, etc.) as metaphor for the process of dying. One of his most recognizable works, Untitled(1992) is a billboard put up in New York City of a monochrome photograph of an unoccupied bed, made after the death of his lover, Ross, to AIDS.

In one interview, he said "When people ask me, 'Who is your public?' I say honestly, without skipping a beat, 'Ross.' The public was Ross. The rest of the people just come to the work."

Gonzalez-Torres died in 1996 due to AIDS related complications. In May 2002, the Felix Gonzalez-Torres Foundation was created. In addition to serving as the official Estate of Felix Gongalez-Torres, the Foundation hopes to "to foster an appreciation for the work of Felix Gonzalez-Torres among the general public, scholars, and art historians." The U.S. representative for the Felix Gonzalez-Torres Foundation is the Andrea Rosen Gallery, which heavily exhibited his work both before and after his death.

In 2007, he was selected as the United States' official representative at the Venice Biennale. (The only other posthumous representative from the United States was Robert Smithson in 1982.)

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