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Stevenson)

Stevenson, Robert Louis (Balfour)

Robert Louis Stevenson.

(born Nov. 13, 1850, Edinburgh, Scot.—died Dec. 3, 1894, Vailima, Samoa) Scottish essayist, novelist, and poet. He prepared for a law career but never practiced. He traveled frequently, partly in search of better climates for his tuberculosis, which would eventually cause his death at age 44. He became known for accounts such as Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes (1879) and essays in periodicals, first collected in Virginibus Puerisque (1881). His immensely popular novels Treasure Island (1883), Kidnapped (1886), and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), and The Master of Ballantrae (1889) were written over the course of a few years. A Child's Garden of Verses (1885) is one of the most influential children's works of the 19th century. In his last years he lived in Samoa and produced works moving toward a new maturity, including the story “The Beach of Falesá” (1892) and the novel Weir of Hermiston (1896), his unfinished masterpiece.

Learn more about Stevenson, Robert Louis (Balfour) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Feb. 5, 1900, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S.—died July 14, 1965, London, Eng.) U.S. politician and diplomat. The grandson of a vice president of the U.S., he practiced law in Chicago from 1926. During World War II he was assistant to the secretary of the navy (1941–44) and to the secretary of state (1945). He served as a U.S. delegate to the UN (1946–47). As governor of Illinois (1949–53), he introduced liberal reforms. Noted for his eloquence and wit, he was twice the Democratic candidate for president (1952, 1956) but lost both times to Dwight D. Eisenhower. He later served as chief U.S. representative to the UN (1961–65).

Learn more about Stevenson, Adlai E(wing) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Robert Louis Stevenson.

(born Nov. 13, 1850, Edinburgh, Scot.—died Dec. 3, 1894, Vailima, Samoa) Scottish essayist, novelist, and poet. He prepared for a law career but never practiced. He traveled frequently, partly in search of better climates for his tuberculosis, which would eventually cause his death at age 44. He became known for accounts such as Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes (1879) and essays in periodicals, first collected in Virginibus Puerisque (1881). His immensely popular novels Treasure Island (1883), Kidnapped (1886), and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), and The Master of Ballantrae (1889) were written over the course of a few years. A Child's Garden of Verses (1885) is one of the most influential children's works of the 19th century. In his last years he lived in Samoa and produced works moving toward a new maturity, including the story “The Beach of Falesá” (1892) and the novel Weir of Hermiston (1896), his unfinished masterpiece.

Learn more about Stevenson, Robert Louis (Balfour) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born Feb. 5, 1900, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S.—died July 14, 1965, London, Eng.) U.S. politician and diplomat. The grandson of a vice president of the U.S., he practiced law in Chicago from 1926. During World War II he was assistant to the secretary of the navy (1941–44) and to the secretary of state (1945). He served as a U.S. delegate to the UN (1946–47). As governor of Illinois (1949–53), he introduced liberal reforms. Noted for his eloquence and wit, he was twice the Democratic candidate for president (1952, 1956) but lost both times to Dwight D. Eisenhower. He later served as chief U.S. representative to the UN (1961–65).

Learn more about Stevenson, Adlai E(wing) with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Stevenson is a city in Jackson County, Alabama, United States, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. As of the 2000 census, the population of the city is 1,770.

Geography

Stevenson is located at (34.869442, -85.831829).

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.2 square miles (13.6 km²), of which, 4.9 square miles (12.8 km²) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.8 km²) of it (5.71%) is water.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,770 people, 795 households, and 508 families residing in the city. The population density was 357.8 people per square mile (138.1/km²). There were 948 housing units at an average density of 191.6/sq mi (73.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 72.88% White, 22.37% Black or African American, 0.90% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 1.30% from other races, and 2.43% from two or more races. 1.53% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 795 households out of which 24.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.4% were married couples living together, 14.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.1% were non-families. 34.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23 and the average family size was 2.83.

In the city the population was spread out with 21.3% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 27.8% from 25 to 44, 26.4% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 89.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $26,908, and the median income for a family was $34,125. Males had a median income of $27,188 versus $21,375 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,806. About 15.5% of families and 19.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.7% of those under age 18 and 22.1% of those age 65 or over.

Stevenson Depot

The Stevenson Railroad Depot Museum is located at the heart of downtown Stevenson, Alabama, situated between the tracks of two major railroads. Its mission is to preserve an important part of railroading history through the display of related artifacts. In addition, the museum, which also chronicles modern times, displays hundreds of artifacts from other parts of the area's past to teach young and old alike. These include artifacts recalling Native American culture, pioneer life and Civil War events. Of all these artifacts, the largest, and one of which Stevenson is most proud, is the historic depot building itself. The depot, which was built in 1872 and listed in the National Register of Historic Places, stands on the ruins of Stevenson's first railroad depot, which was built around 1852 for common use by the Nashville & Chattanooga and the Memphis & Charleston Railroads. That original depot was destroyed either during, or shortly after, the Civil War. Bricks salvaged may have been used in the building of the present structure.

Fort Harker

Constructed by the Union Army in the summer of 1862 and expanded in 1864, using soldiers and freed slaves, Fort Harker was built on a broad hill a quarter-mile east of the town of Stevenson. It overlooked Crow Creek and was well within firing range of Stevenson’s strategic railroad lines, supply depots and warehouses. Ft. Harker was an earthen redoubt, 150 feet square, with walls that were 14 feet high, surrounded by an 8-foot deep dry moat. It contained 7 cannon platforms, a bomb-proof powder magazine, a draw-bridge entrance and an 8-sided wooden blockhouse at its center. Fort Harker was critical to Union plans. No major fighting occurred here, but skirmishes and sniper attacks were common as territory traded hands between Union and Confederate forces. One other large fort, two smaller redoubts and at least seven blockhouses were constructed along the railroad lines at Stevenson during the Civil War. Stevenson was the major junction for the Memphis and Charleston Railroad and the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad . In addition to forts, the Union Army established a medical facility and a refugee camp at Stevenson. The remains of Gen. Rosecrans’ headquarters is on the National Register of Historic Places. Both may be seen near downtown Stevenson today.

Depot Days

Every June, the town of Stevenson holds the annual Depot Days celebration. This celebration includes many different aspects of the southern town's culture and celebrates the great things that Stevenson represents. The week-long celebration is concluded with a parade, a day full of activities, and a street dance in the middle of Downtown Stevenson.

North Jackson High School

Stevenson is the home of the North Jackson High School.

References

External links

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