Definitions

satin

satin

[sat-n]
satin, lustrous silk in which the filling is so arranged as to bind the warp as seldom as possible and so spaced that practically nothing shows but the warp. Satin was first woven by the ancient silk weavers of China and was greatly desired by early Greeks and Romans. In the Middle Ages satin, known as zatoni (from the name of a Chinese town) and samite, was rare and costly and was used for churchly and royal garments. As the secrets of silk making were carried westward, splendid satins were woven in Genoa and Florence, then at Lyons and in England in the 15th cent. Modern satins are made in a great variety of fibers, including synthetic ones.

Fabric constructed by the satin weaving method, one of the three basic textile weaves. Satin weave superficially resembles twill but does not have the regular step in each successive weft that characterizes twills. Thus, there is no strong diagonal line, and the fabric is smooth-faced, with an unbroken surface made up of long floating warp yarns. Because satins are susceptible to the wear caused by rubbing and snagging, they are considered luxury fabrics. Satin is made in different weights for various uses, including dresses (particularly evening wear), linings, bedspreads, and upholstery. Though originally of silk, it may be made of yarns of other fibres.

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Satin is a cloth that typically has a glossy surface and a dull back. It is a warp-dominated weaving technique that forms a minimum number of interlacings in a fabric. If a fabric is formed with a satin weave using filament fibers such as silk, nylon, or polyester, the corresponding fabric is termed a "satin". If the yarns used are short-staple yarns such as cotton, the fabric formed is considered a sateen.

A satin-woven fabric tends to have a high luster due to the high number of "floats" on the fabric. Floats are "missed" interlacings, where the warp yarn lies on top of the weft yarn, or vice versa. The floats tend to make the fabric look glossier as well as give it a smoother "hand" in most cases.

Many variations can be made of the basic satin weave including a Granite weave and a Check weave. Satin weaves, twill weaves, and plain weaves are the three basic types of weaving by which the majority of woven products are formed.

Satin is commonly used in apparel: satin baseball jackets, athletic shorts, women's lingerie, nightgowns, and evening gowns, but also in some men's boxer shorts, shirts and neckties, interior furnishing fabrics, upholstery, and bed sheets. It is also used in the production of pointe shoes for use in ballet.

Origins

Satin began in the Middle Ages as a term for the more lustrous types of the heavy and luxurious silk fabric samite.

See also

References

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