Satchel

Satchel

[sach-uhl]
Paige, Satchel (Leroy Paige), 1906-82, American baseball player, b. Mobile, Ala. He began pitching in 1924, joined his first professional team two years later, and became a star in the Negro leagues during the 1930s. Celebrated for his extraordinary pitching ability and also known for his witty aphorisms, Paige became legendary while barnstorming in the segregated American baseball leagues to which African-American players were restricted prior to the integration of the major leagues beginning in 1947. He played in as many as 2,500 games and is credited with more than 50 no-hitters. In 1948, at the age of 42, he joined the Cleveland Indians of the American League. He pitched for six seasons in the majors and was the first star of the Negro leagues to be inducted (1971) into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

See biography by L. Tye (2009).

orig. Leroy Robert Paige

Satchel Paige, 1942.

(born July 7, 1906?, Mobile, Ala., U.S.—died June 8, 1982, Kansas City, Mo.) U.S. baseball pitcher. Paige earned legendary fame during his many years pitching in the Negro leagues for a myriad of teams that included the Birmingham Black Barons, the Pittsburgh Crawfords, the Kansas City Monarchs, and the New York Black Yankees. He also barnstormed in exhibition games and played in the Caribbean during the off season. He was about 42 years old when he was finally allowed to enter the major leagues in 1948, shortly after Jackie Robinson broke baseball's race barrier. Joining the Cleveland Indians—the oldest player to make his debut in the major leagues—he helped that team win the World Series in his first season. He retired after the 1953 season. A right-handed, loose-jointed “beanpole,” standing 6 ft 4 in. (1.93 m), Paige had considerable pitching speed and a comprehensive mastery of slow-breaking deliveries. He is reputed to have won 2,000 of a total of 2,500 games pitched during his nearly 30-year career. Among Paige's many oft-quoted comments is the admonition “Don't look back, something might be gaining on you.”

Learn more about Paige, Satchel with a free trial on Britannica.com.

orig. Leroy Robert Paige

Satchel Paige, 1942.

(born July 7, 1906?, Mobile, Ala., U.S.—died June 8, 1982, Kansas City, Mo.) U.S. baseball pitcher. Paige earned legendary fame during his many years pitching in the Negro leagues for a myriad of teams that included the Birmingham Black Barons, the Pittsburgh Crawfords, the Kansas City Monarchs, and the New York Black Yankees. He also barnstormed in exhibition games and played in the Caribbean during the off season. He was about 42 years old when he was finally allowed to enter the major leagues in 1948, shortly after Jackie Robinson broke baseball's race barrier. Joining the Cleveland Indians—the oldest player to make his debut in the major leagues—he helped that team win the World Series in his first season. He retired after the 1953 season. A right-handed, loose-jointed “beanpole,” standing 6 ft 4 in. (1.93 m), Paige had considerable pitching speed and a comprehensive mastery of slow-breaking deliveries. He is reputed to have won 2,000 of a total of 2,500 games pitched during his nearly 30-year career. Among Paige's many oft-quoted comments is the admonition “Don't look back, something might be gaining on you.”

Learn more about Paige, Satchel with a free trial on Britannica.com.

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