Rowing_at_the_1912_Summer_Olympics_-_Men's_eights

Rowing at the 1912 Summer Olympics - Men's eights

The men's eights was a rowing event held as part of the Rowing at the 1912 Summer Olympics programme. It was the fourth appearance of the event. The competition was held from Wednesday, July 17, 1912 to Friday, July 19, 1912.

Ninety-nine rowers from eight nations competed.

Medalists


Leander
Edgar Burgess
Sidney Swann
Leslie Wormwald
Ewart Horsfall
James Angus Gillan
Arthur Garton
Alister Kirby
Philip Fleming
Henry Wells

New College
William Fison
William Parker
Thomas Gillespie
Beaufort Burdekin
Frederick Pitman
Arthur Wiggins
Charles Littlejohn
Robert Bourne
John Walker

Berlin
Otto Liebing
Max Bröske
Max Vetter
Willi Bartholomae
Fritz Bartholomae
Werner Dehn
Rudolf Reichelt
Hans Matthiae
Kurt Runge

Starting List

The following boats and/or rowing clubs participated:

  • Sydney Rowing Club
  • Toronto Argonaut
  • Société Nautique de Bayonne
  • Berliner Ruderverein von 1876
  • Sport Borussia, Berlin
  • Leander
  • New College, Oxford
  • Hungária Evezős Egylet
  • Christiania Roklub
  • Göteborgs Roddklubb
  • Roddklubben af 1912

Results

Heats

The heats were held on Wednesday, July 17.

Heat 1: 12 noon The boats kept in company as far as to Stenudden, where the Germans began to show in front, their stroke spurting directly afterwards. The Frenchmen made no response and were soon a length behind. Half way up the course, however, they showed signs of attempting an answering spurt, but went to pieces - in parts. Their opponents rowed as if they meant to win, and as regards style, muscle and training, were quite superior to the Frenchmen, a fact they displayed still more during the last half of the race. The Germans rowed a stroke varying between 32-38 to the minute. The French, rowing from 40-28 per minute, never seriously threatened their opponents, who won by about four lengths.

Heat 1
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1 Carl Eichhorn Ludwig Weihnacht
Richard Friesicke
Andreas Wegener
Fritz Eggebrecht
Heinrich Landrock
Egbert Reinsfeld
Gottfried Gelfort Otto Charlet 6:45.1 QQ
2 Jean Arné Gabriel St. Laurent
Marius Lenjeune
Louis Lafitte
Jean Elichagaray
Joseph Campot
Etienne Lesbats
Pierre Alvarez François Elichagaray

Heat 2: 12.20 p.m. Australia started at 44 for the first half minute, the Swedish keeping to 40. The perfectly trained visitors, who rowed like one man, took the lead after 200 metres and never lost it again. When about half the distance was covered, the Swedish boat showed signs of creeping up the Australians, but the latter increased the pace and passed the boat-huse two clear lengths ahead of their opponents, who showed evident signs of fatigue and were beginning to go pieces. The Australians rowed the whole time at a great pace, with only a slight swing, while the style employed by the Swedes bore greater resemblance to English methods. The home-crew was beaten by more than three lengths.

Heat 2
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1 John Ryrie Simon Fraser
Hugh Ward
Thomas Parker
Henry Hauenstein
Sydney Middleton
Harry Ross-Boden
Roger Fitzhardinge Robert Waley 6:57.0 QQ
2 Einar Amundén Ragnar Bergstedt
Gustaf Broberg
Simon Ericsson
Ivar Rydberg
Anders Almqvist
Arvid Svendel
Leif Sörvik Gillis Ahlberg

Heat 3: 12.40 p.m. The German crew, which forced Germany's best eight, was in front all the time. The Hungarians rowed at a slower pace than their opponents during the whole of the race; they had a nice recovery but could get no good grip of the water and used the slide incorrectly, pushing it before the body. The Germans, on the other hand, rowed in clean English style, even if they had not the same extraordinarily rapid grip of the water and the swift, easy recovery possessed by their models. The Germans, too, were physically the superior of their opponents, and, before any long time had elapsed, their energetic efforts gave them such a lead that, at the boat-house, more than two lengths separated the boats. All the efforts of the Hungarians were in vain and the Germans won quite easily.

Heat 3
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1 Otto Liebing Max Bröske
Max Vetter
Willi Bartholomae
Fritz Bartholomae
Werner Dehn
Rudolf Reichelt
Hans Matthiae Kurt Runge 6:57.0 QQ
2 István Szebeny Artúr Baján
Miltiádész Manno
István Jeney
Lajos Gráf
Miklós Szebeny
Antal Szebeny
György Szebeny Kálmán Vaskó

Heat 4: 1 p.m. The Norwegian eight, who were considerably heavier and more powerfully built than their English rivals, got away first, and kept the lead for about 150 metres rowing as much as 40 while New College kept to 38 for the first minute. Both crews rowed excellently, with a long swing and a powerful grip of the water, but the recovery of the Norwegians was not so quiet as that of the Englishmen, neither was the finish all that could be desired. These two faults, or rather, the fact that the Norwegian crew had not reached the same degree of perfection as the English, probably had been covered, rowing a quiet effective stroke of about 32 per minute. New College won by two lengths.

Heat 4
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1 William Fison William Parker
Thomas Gillespie
Beaufort Burdekin
Frederick Pitman
Arthur Wiggins
Charles Littlejohn
Robert Bourne John Walker 6:42.5 QQ
2 Einar Sommerfelt Thomas Høie
Harald Herolfson
Olaf Solberg
Gustav Hæhre
Hannibal Fegth
Gunnar Grantz
Otto Krogh John Bjørnstad

Heat 5: 1.20 p.m. The Canadians started at 46, while Leander kept to 40, this falling after a minute first to 38 and then to 36, the representatives of the Maple rowing 40-42 during the whole of the race. The two boats kept side by side for a long time, and the pace, in consequence of the terrific time kept up by Canada, was a most amazing one. At the boat-house, Leander spurted and succeeded in creeping half a length in front, but Canada answered with an immensely long, desperate effort and the issue was doubtful until Djurgård Bridge was passed, when Philip Fleming gathered Leander for a final effort which gave the victory to Great Britain by about half a length. Leander rowed in orthodox English style, with a long swing, quiet, finished recovery, a powerful grip of the water and a stroke that was drawn out to the last inch. Canada relied more on muscle, and the tremendous rate at which they rowed prevented a proper recovery. The crew, although beaten, fought like heroes, and lost after the pluckiest struggle imaginable.

Heat 5
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1 Edgar Burgess Sidney Swann
Leslie Wormwald
Ewart Horsfall
James Angus Gillan
Arthur Garton
Alister Kirby
Philip Fleming Henry Wells 6:22.2 QQ
2 Charles Riddy Phil Boyd
Albert Kent
William Murphy
Alex Sinclair
Becher Gale
Richard Gregory
Geoffrey Taylor Winslow McCleary

Heat 6: 1.40 p.m. The Swedish boat raced without opponent.

Heat 6
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1 Gustaf Brunkman Per Mattson
Sebastian Tamm
Ted Wachtmeister
Conrad Brunkman
William Bruhn-Möller
Ture Rosvall
Herman Dahlbäck Wilhelm Wilkens 7:05.2 QQ

Quarterfinals

All quarterfinals were held on Thursday, July 18.

Quarterfinal 1: 3.40 p.m. Both boats got off beautifully and kept side by side for the first 400 metres, the Swedish crew rowing a quicker stroke than New College (35 to 32). By degrees, however, Robert Bourne pushed his boat half a length in front and had this lead on reaching the inner curve at the bath-house, where he spurted in order to make use of the advantage afforded by the position, and the Swedish stroke answered too late. The result was, that at Djurgård Bridge Great Britain led by a length and Herman Dahlbäck, when on reaching the inner curve of his side of the course, did begin a spurt, but could not get his men to respond to his efforts. In the finish the Swedes regained a little of their lost ground, but they could not prevent New College from winning by a length. It was chiefly Robert Bourne's cleverness that decided the race, the manner in which he gathered his crew for the final burst being simply masterly.

Quarterfinal 1
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1 William Fison William Parker
Thomas Gillespie
Beaufort Burdekin
Frederick Pitman
Arthur Wiggins
Charles Littlejohn
Robert Bourne John Walker 6:19.0 QS
2 Gustaf Brunkman Per Mattson
Sebastian Tamm
Ted Wachtmeister
Conrad Brunkman
William Bruhn-Möller
Ture Rosvall
Herman Dahlbäck Wilhelm Wilkens

Quarterfinal 2: 4 p.m. In the German quarterfinal Berlin rowed in brilliant style with a long stroke, a fine swing and powerful grip of the water, followed by a quiet recovery. The other crew showed the same good qualities but not to an equal degree, and Berlin, which was leading by a length at the halfway, won by nearly two and a half lengths.

Quarterfinal 2
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1 Otto Liebing Max Bröske
Max Vetter
Willi Bartholomae
Fritz Bartholomae
Werner Dehn
Rudolf Reichelt
Hans Matthiae Kurt Runge 6:22.2 QS
2 Carl Eichhorn Ludwig Weihnacht
Richard Friesicke
Andreas Wegener
Fritz Eggebrecht
Heinrich Landrock
Egbert Reinsfeld
Gottfried Gelfort Otto Charlet

Quarterfinal 3: 4.20 p.m. Both crews started very well, Australia retaining its speed of about 40 for the whole of the race, while Leander was content with 36-34, the figures sometimes falling to 32. Sydney put all its weight into its stroke and led by a half length at the 1,000 metres mark. The time for half distance was 3:02; these figures showing the speed at which the boats were moving. At the boat-house Australia led and took the inner curve a clear length ahead. At this point, however, Philip Fleming began a terrific spurt, which resulted in his opponents# lead being diminished at the bridge to only half a length. The Australian eight now began to row somewhat raggedly and showed other signs of fatigue; Leander, on the contrary, beginning another magnificent spurt which lasted until the winning post was passed. Roger Fitzhardinge was not sufficiently supported by his men, so that the half length by which Australia led at the bridge was snatched out of its hands. The two boats lay side by side 100 metres from the finish, but Leander stayed better, and the English style allowed of more being got of the spurt, so that the British boat won by about three metres.

Quarterfinal 3
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1 Edgar Burgess Sidney Swann
Leslie Wormwald
Ewart Horsfall
James Angus Gillan
Arthur Garton
Alister Kirby
Philip Fleming Henry Wells 6:10.2 QS
2 John Ryrie Simon Fraser
Hugh Ward
Thomas Parker
Henry Hauenstein
Sydney Middleton
Harry Ross-Boden
Roger Fitzhardinge Robert Waley

Semifinals

Both semifinals were held on Friday, July 19.

Semifinal 1: 11.30 p.m. The New College raced without opponent. But Robert Bourne took his men over the course giving the spectators a good opportunity of seeing the pure English style of rowing, with ist firm grip of the water and the quiet, almost stealthy recovery.

Semifinal 1
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1 William Fison William Parker
Thomas Gillespie
Beaufort Burdekin
Frederick Pitman
Arthur Wiggins
Charles Littlejohn
Robert Bourne John Walker 7:47.0 QF

Semifinal 2: 12 noon At the very start, Leander managed to get a couple of metres' lead, but the German crew soon recovered itself, and at the 500 metres mark was leading by about half a length. As seen from the shore, the English eight seemed to take the race very quietly, rowing scarcely more than 34 to their opponents' 38, and at the 1,000 metres mark the Germans were leading by nearly a length. Just before reaching the boat-house, Leander, which had the outside curve, spurted and managed to pick up about half a length, while the Germans, committed the fault of not making use of the advantage given by the possession of the inner curve, and making an extra exertion which have certainly increased the distance between them anf the English crew, or, in any case, would have kept them at their previous distance in the rear. Philip Fleming put his men to a severe test from the bath-house to the bridge, and the determination and speed by means of which Leander drew level with their opponents after one minute's rapid spurt, were simply unique. The German crew was not rowed out, however, and a desperate struggle took place all the way from the bridge to the finish, the result being that Leander won by about half a length. Once more a British boat won with excellent tactics.

Semifinal 2
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1 Edgar Burgess Sidney Swann
Leslie Wormwald
Ewart Horsfall
James Angus Gillan
Arthur Garton
Alister Kirby
Philip Fleming Henry Wells 6:16.2 QF
Otto Liebing Max Bröske
Max Vetter
Willi Bartholomae
Fritz Bartholomae
Werner Dehn
Rudolf Reichelt
Hans Matthiae Kurt Runge 6:18.6

Final

The final was held on Friday, July 19.

Final: 6 p.m. The two boats rowed side by side until the 1,000 metres mark was passed, when Leander spurted in order to neutralize Robert Bourne's efforts at the bath-house, where New College had the inner curve. Then Philip Fleming pressed his men from the bath-house to the brisge, so that Leander led by a clear length at the latter place, all Robert Bourne's efforts being unable to prevent New College from falling behind. Leander won by about a length.

Final
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time
Edgar Burgess Sidney Swann
Leslie Wormwald
Ewart Horsfall
James Angus Gillan
Arthur Garton
Alister Kirby
Philip Fleming Henry Wells 6:15.7
William Fison William Parker
Thomas Gillespie
Beaufort Burdekin
Frederick Pitman
Arthur Wiggins
Charles Littlejohn
Robert Bourne John Walker 6:19.2

References

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