Randall

Randall

[ran-dl]
Jarrell, Randall, 1914-65, American poet and critic, b. Nashville, Tenn., grad. Vanderbilt Univ. (B.A., 1935; M.A., 1938). His poetry, reflecting an unusually sensitive and tragic view of life, includes Blood for a Stranger (1942), The Seven-League Crutches (1951), and The Woman at the Washington Zoo (1960). His best-known poem, "The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner," was a mediation on his experiences during World War II. In 1953 his critical essays were collected and published as Poetry and the Age. Jarrell's other works include several delightful children's books; Pictures from an Institution (1954), a satirical novel set in a progressive women's college; and A Sad Heart at the Supermarket (1962), a collection of essays and fables.

See his complete poems (1969); posthumous collections of his criticism and essays, The Third Book of Criticism (1969), Kipling, Auden & Co. (1980), and No Other Book (ed. by B. Leithauser, 1999); his letters (ed. by M. Jarrell, 1985); memoir by his wife, Mary Jarrell (1999); studies by R. Lowell et al., ed. (1967), C. Beck (1983), J. Bryant (1986), and S. Burt (2003); bibliography by S. Wright (1986).

Randall, James Garfield, 1881-1953, American historian, b. Indianapolis, Ind. He taught history and political science at various colleges before joining (1920) the faculty of the Univ. of Illinois. A leading authority on Lincoln, Randall was a leader of the Civil War revisionists (who maintained that the war was not inevitable and came about as a result of the failures of American statesmanship). Randall wrote Constitutional Problems under Lincoln (1926), The Civil War and Reconstruction (1937; rev. by David Donald, 1961), Lincoln the President: Springfield to Gettysburg (4 vol., 1945-55; Vol. IV completed by R. N. Current), Lincoln and the South (1946), and Lincoln the Liberal Statesman (1947).
Randall, Samuel Jackson, 1828-90, American politician, b. Philadelphia. A Democrat, he was a U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania from 1863 until his death. As speaker (1876-81), he presided over the sessions dealing with the disputed presidential election of 1876 and helped codify the House's rules of procedure. He was also chairman (1883-87) of the powerful appropriations committee. Because of Pennsylvania's industrial interests, Randall always opposed his party's traditional stand for a low tariff. He fell out (1887) with President Cleveland on this issue and thereafter lost most of his influence.

(born May 6, 1914, Nashville, Tenn., U.S.—died Oct. 14, 1965, Chapel Hill, N.C.) U.S. poet and critic. He taught at the University of North Carolina (Greensboro) from 1947 until his death. As a critic, he revitalized the reputations of Robert Frost, Walt Whitman, and William Carlos Williams in the 1950s; his criticism is collected in Poetry and the Age (1953), A Sad Heart at the Supermarket (1962), and the posthumous Third Book of Criticism (1969). His poems appeared in Little Friend, Little Friend (1945) and Losses (1948), both drawing on his wartime experiences, and such later collections as The Seven-League Crutches (1951) and The Woman at the Washington Zoo (1960). He was killed when he stepped in front of a moving car.

Learn more about Jarrell, Randall with a free trial on Britannica.com.

(born May 6, 1914, Nashville, Tenn., U.S.—died Oct. 14, 1965, Chapel Hill, N.C.) U.S. poet and critic. He taught at the University of North Carolina (Greensboro) from 1947 until his death. As a critic, he revitalized the reputations of Robert Frost, Walt Whitman, and William Carlos Williams in the 1950s; his criticism is collected in Poetry and the Age (1953), A Sad Heart at the Supermarket (1962), and the posthumous Third Book of Criticism (1969). His poems appeared in Little Friend, Little Friend (1945) and Losses (1948), both drawing on his wartime experiences, and such later collections as The Seven-League Crutches (1951) and The Woman at the Washington Zoo (1960). He was killed when he stepped in front of a moving car.

Learn more about Jarrell, Randall with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Randall is a city in Hamilton County, Iowa, United States. The population was 148 at the 2000 census.

Geography

Randall is located at (42.237408, -93.602532).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.5 square miles (1.2 km²), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 148 people, 68 households, and 45 families residing in the city. The population density was 321.8 people per square mile (124.2/km²). There were 75 housing units at an average density of 163.1/sq mi (63.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 100.00% White. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.35% of the population.

There were 68 households out of which 27.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.9% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.8% were non-families. 32.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.18 and the average family size was 2.76.

In the city the population was spread out with 24.3% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 29.7% from 25 to 44, 25.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 100.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,750, and the median income for a family was $40,875. Males had a median income of $27,500 versus $22,500 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,991. There were 4.4% of families and 6.4% of the population living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 16.7% of those over 64.

References

External links

Search another word or see Randallon Dictionary | Thesaurus |Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;